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Think about re-Valveing the suspension and possibly doing new springs

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Some one told me this is the best money spent on bike. Is that true? What exactly does it do that is so great? It's a brand new KTM

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Setting your suspension up for 'you' is the best thing you can do to any bike. Its simply about making sure the bike handles and reacts in a way that is both safe and works across a range of scenarios which you will encounter. Of course every tuner will have their own suggestions, and ever rider has their own preferences, not to mention we all ride a variety of different areas with massive variances in personal style. Basically the factory comes out with a generic stack which works OK for MOST people, which means there is room for improvement for YOU.

 

Personally, I'd do a few hours on the stock suspension, let it bed in and get a feel for it. If you are well and truly out of scope of the stock springs (really light/really heavy) then I'd get them done first, but follow with a revalve at your first service. This way you'll have some information and data to pass on to the tuner about how the bike handles, what you like, and what you dislike, which will help them dial it in.

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Setting your suspension up for 'you' is the best thing you can do to any bike. Its simply about making sure the bike handles and reacts in a way that is both safe and works across a range of scenarios which you will encounter. Of course every tuner will have their own suggestions, and ever rider has their own preferences, not to mention we all ride a variety of different areas with massive variances in personal style. Basically the factory comes out with a generic stack which works OK for MOST people, which means there is room for improvement for YOU.

 

Personally, I'd do a few hours on the stock suspension, let it bed in and get a feel for it. If you are well and truly out of scope of the stock springs (really light/really heavy) then I'd get them done first, but follow with a revalve at your first service. This way you'll have some information and data to pass on to the tuner about how the bike handles, what you like, and what you dislike, which will help them dial it in.

Great post. If you do need to change the springs and it is still not quite right, spend a lot of time with clicker adjustments and oil level. Exhaust every option and you may save a lot of money. Many whine but stock stuff is very good these days for most of us.

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