Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Will paint thinner ruin my air filters?

Recommended Posts

I'm tired of researching and being undecided about what to put in my parts washer.

I think I'll just go cheap with paint thinner.

Main concern is, will it eat up my Twin Air filters?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I mostly use my parts washer followed by Dawn dish washing liquid.

 

But I have used gasoline and paint thinner both.  Although neither one "melted" my filters at that moment, there was never long term continued used of either one. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I mostly use my parts washer followed by Dawn dish washing liquid.

 

But I have used gasoline and paint thinner both.  Although neither one "melted" my filters at that moment, there was never long term continued used of either one.

What's in your parts washer?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just read your post again.  Do you have a parts washer vat, or just a bucket to clean filters with?

 

You can by parts washer fluid at just about any auto supply store. Years ago you could buy Varsol.  Now all you can find is Mineral Spirits.  I reckon the EPA took care of that.

 

Here in town at Autozone, a 5 gallon bucket of parts washer fluid (mineral spirits) is about 85.00

If you can find a checmical company that sells it out of there big tanks, it about half that price.


What's in your parts washer?

 

Mineral Spirits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Think paint thinner or mineral spirits considered safest, followed by diesel or kerosene.

I use kerosene because I have it, no issues 3 bikes, many filters.

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The cleaner is used to disolve the tacky filter spray, but does nothing for the dirt.  Then I head straight to the water hose (sink if wife is not home) and a thorough Dawn bath to remove parts cleaner and dirt.  Then I squeeze (do not ring) filter and place it on the back of my shop fans until it's dryer than a hounds tooth sitting on the front porch in the summertime.  lol

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep reading so much about thinner and gasoline drying out or loosening the glue that holds together filter elements that it scared me off.  I gave up after the 50/50 pro-con split on the net on that stuff and just decided to go with Oxiclean and it seems to be working well so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep reading so much about thinner and gasoline drying out or loosening the glue that holds together filter elements that it scared me off.  I gave up after the 50/50 pro-con split on the net on that stuff and just decided to go with Oxiclean and it seems to be working well so far.

 

 

I would imagine if your filter is aged or there was continued use, it would begin to have an effect on them.  I replace my filters fairly regular so I've never noticed any problems. 

 

I think key would be not to soak them.  The cleaner cuts the tacky spray immediately, so the bath doesn't last long.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First off I would expect an air filter for a gas engine to be resistant to gasoline. If using gasoline to clean a filter damages the filter then it was made from the wrong materials. 

Have said that I've had several filters deteriorate with age and require replacement.

 

Mineral spirits are derived from petroleum so also should be safe to use for initial cleaning of a filter.

 

Google "mineral spirits wiki" for more info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last time I used pajnt thinner, my filter split

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use diesel in my parts washers. It's relatively cheap...solvent is somewhere in the $50+/gal. It just takes a bit more effort to do the same job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First off I would expect an air filter for a gas engine to be resistant to gasoline. If using gasoline to clean a filter damages the filter then it was made from the wrong materials. 

Air filters are for filtering dirt, not gasoline. There's no gasoline passing through them in normal operating conditions.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Air filters are for filtering dirt, not gasoline. There's no gasoline passing through them in normal operating conditions.

 

I agree with ya not only with the theory here, but in the practical application of using gasoline for air filter cleaning.  It does not practically work because I've ruined many air filters by using gasoline. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×