To Balance or Not ? Tires

So  I had My tires swapped out and new tubes and went to rim locks  front and rear

 

I had discussed My riding with the shop  and they new it was a new to me  street able dual sport  xr 650L

 

the old tires were  originally balanced but When I went to mount these I noticed the old weights were off ( residual tape )  and no new tape or spoke weights on the rims ?(I doubt they didn't require any weights)

 

 

I paid 280.00 +  for the tires ,tubes,locks and that was 40 bucks labor  to swap and  mount

 

I didn't cheap out at all and I paid My respect to the shop  by paying full price for the parts from them and not the internet

 

 

did I get screwed ?   this is a well known shop

 

I have not even put them back on yet   to ride  so maybe I will just see how they feel 

 

and if it's chit I will have to pull them back off and drive the hour each way to have them balanced ( probably get charged more? )

 

thx

 

 

balance,  especially the front, and especially if you ever ride 50mph plus.  If you don't want to mess with it now maybe just go ride it and see if you can notice any hop thump on smooth pavement. 

 

You can do a "good enough" balance by just putting the bike on a stand and loosing the axle and prying the brake pads away from the disc.  On the rear also derail the chain by pushing the axle forward, lay it on the swing arm.

 

spin the wheel and mark the tire or spoke at bottom center, repeat and see if goes to the same place,  your then add weight opposite   ( can use fishing lead wrapped around spokes, comes on a roll like solder).  

 

ideally you'd do it on a balance stand which would eliminate seal drag,  but it works

great idea I am  just putting them on and have the chain off to replace for a new one  so it's a perfect chance

 

thanks

Edited by Zimman

I have no experience with this however I know some that love it. While not completely balanced it should be a quick fix.

 

http://www.ride-on.com/motorcycle-formula-mot.html

Edited by weantright

I have no experience with this however I know some that love it. While not completely balanced it should be a quick fix.

 

http://www.ride-on.com/motorcycle-formula-mot.html

This stuff is amazing! I have been using it the last season. My bagged up beast is steady as a rock at 80+ mph highway speeds. It works great in both my tide and Tubliss wheel sets. 

 

It will seal a leak as well. One thing to remember is that you will experience some headshake at the 1st few miles of your ride after the bike has set overnight or longer.

There is no way that stuff or even DynaBeads can properly balance wheels that run single rim locks or Tubliss.  We are talking about wheels that are 3 - 5 ozs out of balance here.  Note that both front and rear wheels must be balanced, not just the front.

While not completely balanced it should be a quick fix.

 

 

This is why I stated this

As a distance rider for a lot of years ( 2- 100,000 mile pins ) on street bikes and who knows how many on dirt bikes I have always changed my own tires and never balanced a one.

As a distance rider for a lot of years ( 2- 100,000 mile pins ) on street bikes and who knows how many on dirt bikes I have always changed my own tires and never balanced a one.

THE WHOLE WHEEL AND TIRE BALANCING INDUSTRY IS A SCAM!!!!BEWARE!!!

I have a balance stand and do my my own,  it's not a scam.  Though street tires generally take a whole lot less weight to balance, maybe why you have gotten away with it.  They more carefully over lap the plys positioned around the diameter of the tire. and usually tubeless.  Dirt and many ds tires aren't made with any concern for being true or balance.

Edited by highmarker

Ya you could easily balance them yourself. But from what you paid I wouldn't have thought twice that it wasn't something they took care of. In calgary at bow cycle. I sourced my own rims and tires and brought them in for install. They were out of weights so came back a week later and they balanced mine for free when I randomly came in w/o a appointment.

Call those guys back and tell them to balance em

There is no way that stuff or even DynaBeads can properly balance wheels that run single rim locks or Tubliss. We are talking about wheels that are 3 - 5 ozs out of balance here. Note that both front and rear wheels must be balanced, not just the front.

No need to balance a dirt bike wheel anyway. But yes the Ride On does work quite well. Personal choice I guess. I would like to know why you balance a MC wheel?

No need to balance a dirt bike wheel anyway. But yes the Ride On does work quite well. Personal choice I guess. I would like to know why you balance a MC wheel?

 

It depends on the riding conditions, where you ride, and how fast you ride.  My average riding speed is probably 21-22 mph over many thousands of miles of trail and desert riding.  At lower speeds there is no problem with wheel balance, however at higher speeds (over 50 mph) there certainly is a problem.  At high speeds (over 70 mph) riding with wheels that are 5 ozs out of balance it is not only a problem but is very dangerous.  A few years ago, I had a dual sported '96 Husaberg FE600e.  While riding on pavement at 80+ mph with unbalanced single rim lock wheels, the rear end would shake, wobble and shimmy from side to side so much that it was difficult to stay on the road.  It was so dramatic that riders behind me observed the rear end of the bike actually hopping back and forth.  It is so easy to get the balance close enough with a few balance weights and a pair of jack stands when the wheel is off the bike during a tire change.  I now routinely use an inexpensive static tire balancer from Harbor Freight.

 

Edited by Chas_M

 

It depends on the riding conditions, where you ride, and how fast you ride.  My average riding speed is probably 21-22 mph over many thousands of miles of trail and desert riding.  At lower speeds there is no problem with wheel balance, however at higher speeds (over 50 mph) there certainly is a problem.  At high speeds (over 70 mph) riding with wheels that are 5 ozs out of balance it is not only a problem but is very dangerous.  A few years ago, I had a dual sported '96 Husaberg FE600e.  While riding on pavement at 80+ mph with unbalanced single rim lock wheels, the rear end would shake, wobble and shimmy from side to side so much that it was difficult to stay on the road.  It was so dramatic that riders behind me observed the rear end of the bike actually hopping back and forth.  It is so easy to get the balance close enough with a few balance weights and a pair of jack stands when the wheel is off the bike during a tire change.  I now routinely use an inexpensive static tire balancer from Harbor Freight.

 

:thumbsup: WELL SAID! THANKS

thanks

 

i did get it up to 50 and didn't notice any issues but with fresh knobbies  it's hard to feel whats going on LOL

 

I didn't try to balance them at home since I didn't have any weights  but I will grab some and do a static balance for piece of mind

 

It depends on the riding conditions, where you ride, and how fast you ride.  My average riding speed is probably 21-22 mph over many thousands of miles of trail and desert riding.  At lower speeds there is no problem with wheel balance, however at higher speeds (over 50 mph) there certainly is a problem.  At high speeds (over 70 mph) riding with wheels that are 5 ozs out of balance it is not only a problem but is very dangerous.  A few years ago, I had a dual sported '96 Husaberg FE600e.  While riding on pavement at 80+ mph with unbalanced single rim lock wheels, the rear end would shake, wobble and shimmy from side to side so much that it was difficult to stay on the road.  It was so dramatic that riders behind me observed the rear end of the bike actually hopping back and forth.  It is so easy to get the balance close enough with a few balance weights and a pair of jack stands when the wheel is off the bike during a tire change.  I now routinely use an inexpensive static tire balancer from Harbor Freight.

 

I have never ran into that issue. Not to say it couldn't happen. My bike is steady as a rock and runs perfectly true at 80+ mph. The Ride On Formula was highly recommended to me by someone who actually uses the stuff.  I have no doubt it's every bit as good as weights for my application. Of course it's a very personal choice. I Know guys that feel a lot safer with the wheel weights. In that case go for it. Whether I'm running full blown knobbies or a more street oriented tire, wheel weights are a waste of effort for me. 

 

I'm much more concerned with keeping my wheels true and spokes tight.

Keep in mind the first time you take your dual sport bike off road and start slamming into rocks and such, it will get knocked out of balance anyway.

 

Another trick that is not mentioned here is to use 2 rim locks across from each other. It's another option for you to get a good balance.

Install a rim lock opposite the other one. The rim lock is what unbalances the wheel.

I run dirt tires on my dual sport/ dirt bike and absolutely have to balance the front tire if running at speed. No problem if only in the singletrack and slower type stuff but once out in the desert or fire roads my wrists will ache if the front at least is not balanced. It is easy to balance them yourself. We once balanced my front with three quarters duct taped to the rim. Huge difference.

I use these on the spokes. I tried sticky weights but they didn't stick for long.

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