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I feel like I'm stuck in a rut, for a few years, my speed on the track got noticeably better each time I went. Now I barely get any faster, if at all each time. How can I get myself back on the right track, I know nothing can replace good old practice, but what are things I can do while practicing to get the most out of it?

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Stand up everywhere except the corners. Have someone watch you and give you advice about 1 specific thing to work on, isolate it, then drill it until you get noticeably (to you) better at that one thing. Don't focus on anything else to "improve" until you are satisfied that you made progress in your chosen area of focus. These are things that worked for us, and I look forward to hearing from others and you if you find answers.

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I feel like I'm stuck in a rut, for a few years, my speed on the track got noticeably better each time I went. Now I barely get any faster, if at all each time. How can I get myself back on the right track, I know nothing can replace good old practice, but what are things I can do while practicing to get the most out of it?

honestly. try and take some time off. i doubt your an A rider where your speed cant improve much due to the fact you are posting on here. no offence.... but im serious. take a week off and try again. or try a new track. you need to make yourself excited to ride again

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Try being 55 YO.

 

"the older I am, the faster I was"

 

Seriously, above advice is good.

 

Mike

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Thanks for the replies and yeah I'm no where near an A rider all the tracks around me are closed except for one due to red sticker season (I hate California) once the other tracks open up and I get some variety hopefully ill start progressing again my main problem is I feel alright when I'm riding but when I get home I think about all the things I should have worked on or could've done better on then by the time I get back on the bike those things are completely gone from my head

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Different riding conditions and tracks will help.

You get either bored or fear sections of the same track, if riding the same place.

I found by running different tracks will build confidence and help prevent some bad track habits.

Most of all have fun. Loosen up.

If you need a reminder to stand up, ride with no seat. Couple laps will do it.

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The plateau is a very common subject and its a very serious subjects because its what separates the quick guys from the fast guys. What does it take to become a better rider, someone who can break through that plateau? In my opinion, it takes having defined goals and working towards those goals.

Motocross is a really fun sport, you can ride at pretty much any pace and still have a good time. This is part of the reason why becoming a quicker rider is so difficult. It takes so much more then swinging your leg over the bike and putting in seat time. People say seat time is everything, but they forget to put in the caveat; quality seat time is the most important thing. Quality is the key aspect and that means, showing up to the track with a game plan, goals you wish to achieve and then being able to achieve them.

So the question is... how do you build new goals? Some goals are easy; I wanna be able to clear that big jump, I wanna work on my ruts, blowing out berms, throwing whips, etc. These are the goals most people have, they are what I consider worthless goals because they don't have any reason behind them. If blowing out the berm doesn't make you faster, then what's the point? The fastest line, the quickest lap, these are the goals people should be focusing on. The problem is, in the world of amateur motocross, most people just ride and don't pay much attention to collecting data.

The key is data collection and using that data as a reference and guide to becoming a better rider. So how do you collect data? There are multiple methods and the two I prefer are a GPS laptimer which can be downloaded into your laptop and a simple gopro helmet mount video camera. These two very simple pieces of electronics, will give you the data necessary to cataloging your abilities as a rider.

The first step is to find a track which doesn't change much. Down here in So Cal, I'm very fortunate to have one of those tracks, but it may take you a while and it may be a long drive, but you've gotta do it. Then you need to collect data from that track. Sometimes that data collection is simply going to youtube and finding a video of a faster rider. It may require you to put the GPS laptimer on a very fast A class racer and have their data handy for the future.

Then, you need to collect data of yourself riding, both with the GPS system and on helmet cam video. When you come home and download the data, the issues will be clear as day. You can overlap data and see where you're stronger and where you're weaker. The next step is to focus on building a simple goal structure and every time you go to the track, you focus on one single goal. Wether its going through a single corner a few tenths quicker, hitting a jump that is loosing you a lot of time not hitting, or perhaps something simple like a rhythm section, you aren't doing right. You can also follow faster riders, videoing what they do in the sections your weak in. The key is, when you collect data like gopro video, its very easy to see where you're going wrong and where your going right, its a trial and error process. It will also give you data to hand over to an instructor so they can help you fine-tune your riding skills based on simple, logical, hard data.

Once you get one track nailed, then go to another and do the whole process over again.

Yes, this technique may not work for everyone. Some people can't afford the tools, others can't afford the time. But if you wish to break through your plateau, if you wish to break through the barriers, you need to work hard. Some people just race, they feel that simply lining up on a gate will make them quicker, but in reality you could be stagnant racing as well. Motivation and goals are the key and without those two things, there just isn't anyway of being more successful then you are today.

Sorry for the rant and remember, this is just the opinion of one not fast rider. I will never be fast, but I work hard at being better then I was the day before. ;)

Edited by tye1138

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do you ride with anyone?

 

best thing for me, is finding people of higher or equal skill level as me and then just flat out race them every single time you hit the track. even though its practice, sticking your neck out on the line to where youre kind of pushing it a little bit to make passes or stay in front when they're on your ass, has helped me push far longer and harder than ive ever been able to by myself. i notice my speed and skill increasing at a fairly regular rate. no A rider here, but im happy with how im progressing.

 

i did not know there are mx tracks here in cali that follow the red sticker rules...i thought that was public land only. every track i go to in socal is open all year long barring weird weather, holidays or other rare circumstances.

Edited by mynewcr250
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Faster?

 

Go race! Nothing beats gate time period.

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Indeed...and race in practice. Also...and I know I am a broken record here...try to find some of those riding areas that are not designated tracks. Places that have become good practice spots for MX that aren't groomed because they are just pieces of land that have been ridden on. For me there is the tracks that are legit spots where you pound out laps and it generally stays the same...therefore you can break it down to collect that data and you can measure your progress. Then there are the other spots where you almost don't want to ride them at speed because they are to gnarly from lack of grooming and mother nature.

But regardless of where. The key is that you have to push. You have to get comfortable on a bike that may be doing freaky shit underneath you that doesn't seem sustainable. In other words when you really watch Villopoto navigate through the rough stuff it is unreal what his bike is doing and how he is compensating for it...or just the way he applies his body English. But he has practiced it. I will go out there and do a section at speed and my bike may skip funny and I will get through the section and realize "WOW..that was scary but man it was fast. I am ok. The bike ate it up like nothing." So I trust the bike and I do the same thing. Finally there comes a time where that funny kick isn't so scary and you don't hesitate. This is what riding fast is all about.

Its constantly learning how to break through the mental barrier of doing things on the bike that don't seem natural or comfy. If you do not taste these situations you won't get any faster. It has to become normal to jump that massive breaking bump and land into the turn seated and already accelerating....man you don't want to do it because its a blind turn but you have to because there is no other way and its all sand and you have to be on it...see what I mean.

This is why suspension is not set it and forget it. You must learn about tuning the suspension. As you get faster there is always a better setting. As you get faster if you aren't stiffening things up and getting the rebound adjusted properly you will not be safe. Rebound is everything if you want to cook.

Edited by mikerides33
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Thanks for the replies and yeah I'm no where near an A rider all the tracks around me are closed except for one due to red sticker season (I hate California) once the other tracks open up and I get some variety hopefully ill start progressing again my main problem is I feel alright when I'm riding but when I get home I think about all the things I should have worked on or could've done better on then by the time I get back on the bike those things are completely gone from my head

&%$#@!????  Red sticker season! You serious? But jet planes still fly over your head and dump more pollution in one jet stream than any track can put out in a day. Time to vote more wackos out of office. effing ridiculous.

 

I tend to think riding with faster riders always helps as well as different tracks.

Edited by dogfish

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Me...yes. Guess my post sounded like I do not? Just trying to explain my practice mentality...taking the racing and trying to get those uncomfortable heat of battle moments in practice

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Me...yes. Guess my post sounded like I do not? Just trying to explain my practice mentality...taking the racing and trying to get those uncomfortable heat of battle moments in practice

 

Sorry MIke, yes I know you race....I was asking the OP. If he has stayed stale, racing is a good way challenge yourself and forces you to step it up......

 

How's the RMZ doing over the KTM?

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I haven't raced in a while, if my dad isn't working this weekend, I'll

Be racing for the first time in a few years, I can't drive yet so my practices are limited to once a weekend if I'm lucky but once I get my license in November I plan on going twice a weekend and once or twice a week, lastly I do have a Gopro and I have compared my lap times, on my track I was down to a 1:36 but I crashed hard and was out of it for a few weeks and once I started riding again they changed a straightaway to a woop section and now my fastest lap time is 1:42

So I don't really know if I'm on pace or not compared to before my crash

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Sorry MIke, yes I know you race....I was asking the OP. If he has stayed stale, racing is a good way challenge yourself and forces you to step it up......

How's the RMZ doing over the KTM?

I really like it....like I said it brought the love back.

Transitioning was easy as the ergos were not worlds apart. I have kept the stock bars and basically just dialed the suspension and put in a Core EXP. No motor work just the 4.1 exhaust. I am all done playing musical bike. I have 3 kids and the whole deal now and I am poor so I feel like its just a solid ride.

I wish I could have kept the katoom for a woods weapon though. It shined in the woods. The Suzuki is more start left for me and I feel like I can kind of push the bike into the ground more if that makes sense.

Thanks for asking haha!:rolleyes:

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Find faster riders to practice with or get an &%$#@! mechanic with a stopwatch "and a pitboard" to tell you how slow you are!!! :rant:

 

Whatever it takes to get you fired up and ride beyond the comfort zone. The more you do then the more used to it you become, then that &%$#@! mechanic has to push you harder!

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I haven't raced in a while, if my dad isn't working this weekend, I'll

Be racing for the first time in a few years, I can't drive yet so my practices are limited to once a weekend if I'm lucky but once I get my license in November I plan on going twice a weekend and once or twice a week, lastly I do have a Gopro and I have compared my lap times, on my track I was down to a 1:36 but I crashed hard and was out of it for a few weeks and once I started riding again they changed a straightaway to a woop section and now my fastest lap time is 1:42. So I don't really know if I'm on pace or not compared to before my crash

Good stuff! Yea, when you get your license and have a way to travel further distances, you'll find a better place to ride for sure.

Looks like you understand the whole laptime game, now your goal should be to match your old laptime with the whoop section in the track. ;)

Ya know, racing is great if you're in the mood to push, if you are embroiled in a battle. But if you're out there riding your own race, doing your own thing, there is nothing different then practice besides the simple fact, you're most likely not going to pull off if you get tired. I'm all for racing if you're good enough to actually race and not be a roving chicane.

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