Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Opinions on free wheeling vs engine braking

Recommended Posts

What do you guys think is better for mx? I have a Rekluse exp2.0 and was thinking about setting it up to free wheel into corners without the engine braking but I don't want to get used to something that would end up hurting my technique in the end. Would this be the same effect a slipper has?

Edited by Kyle13

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you guys think is better for mx? I have a Rekluse exp2.0 and was thinking about setting it up to free wheel into corners without the engine braking but I don't want to get used to something that would end up hurting my technique in the end. Would this be the same effect a slipper has?

I know a girl who had a rekluse in her supermoto bike but didnt like it in her dirt bike.  I would guess its a feeling that you have to get use to.  I do like the idea of going as hard as you can into a corner and not worry about stalling and the lack of engine braking is a plus.  Thats one reason I like the 2 strokes is because they are a lot harder to stall and i hate the feeling of the drag on the back tire with 4 strokes.  I could see this going away and it would be awesome.  It would take some getting use to but i could see some benefits.  I dont think it would mess with your technique, i would actually think it would help as its one less fear you have if you dont have to worry about stalling the bike.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Rekluse will always drag a bit, its not like engine breaking, its more smooth and consistent. It feels more like clutch slipping then nothing at all.

Engine breaking isn't good on any bike, because it upsets the chassis geometry. So yea, setting the rekluse up to slip, would be the optimal condition.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Without engine braking or even trail braking the rear shock will unload coming in over braking bumps. I wouldn't consider that a good situation to be in, especially when you blow right by that rut you were wanting to get in.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Rekluse will always drag a bit, its not like engine breaking, its more smooth and consistent. It feels more like clutch slipping then nothing at all.

Engine breaking isn't good on any bike, because it upsets the chassis geometry. So yea, setting the rekluse up to slip, would be the optimal condition.

Where are you coming up with this nonsense?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Without engine braking or even trail braking the rear shock will unload coming in over braking bumps. I wouldn't consider that a good situation to be in, especially when you blow right by that rut you were wanting to get in.

Well a lot of people brake with the clutch.  Aint that the same thing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, I mistyped. My point was, engine braking is a side effect that isn't necessary. We the rider's should be able to control the tucking of the rear end using our rear brake.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a trainer out there will have you pull in the clutch and then use the brakes, there is no consistency in that. Only the older vet guys (I see) pull the clutch in to keep from stalling the motor. Momentum and engine braking is what should be used IMHO, maybe Gary will get on here and give us his opinion. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There should be a mandatory disclaimer after Tye's posts so newbs don't actually take anything he says seriously.

Mods should insert it in his signature line.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I might be the only one but i actually like engine braking. Entering a fast corner i just downshift instead of grabbing the brakes and if it is a muddy day i use it with the brakes because alone they lock up and dont stop very good.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mods should insert it in his signature line.

Can we start a TT poll to enforce this?  Or a petition (what 5,00 signatures) to make this mandatory.  I'm sure we can easily find support to get this approved.  Tye needs to be banned or at least have a disclaimer in his signature.  The dude is a joke, a real life poser.   

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about everybody quit acting like idiots?

The mods can help if you wish. :devil:

I have a feeling I know what you're referring to by this!

:D

Can we start a TT poll to enforce this? Or a petition (what 5,00 signatures) to make this mandatory. I'm sure we can easily find support to get this approved. Tye needs to be banned or at least have a disclaimer in his signature. The dude is a joke, a real life poser.

I'm not that strongly opinionated, I just like messing with him!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Engine braking (not breaking) won't lock the wheel, whereas the foundation brake will.  If the wheel bounces clear of the ground, or just gets light for a second, the brake will stop it, and it may or may not release the wheel to turn again when it touches down.  Engine braking works because the wheel is connected to something that wants to turn slower that the wheel, but doesn't want to stop turning. So, the most that will happen is that the wheel will turn slower than the actual bike speed, not lock up.  Ask anyone who has ridden a lot of flat track or speedway which he prefers

 

As far as a Rekluse goes, it is an auto-engaging centrifugally operated clutch that depends only on the speed of the clutch basket to engage it.  The clutch itself "knows" only whether it's going fast enough to engage, or slow enough to disengage, and nothing else.  Because of that, it has no way of determining whether the power is on or off, whether you are accelerating or decelerating, and holds just as hard when you let off the gas at 5000 RPM as when you are on it.  Engine braking with a Rekluse is precisely the same as with a manual clutch all the way down to the release point. 

 

The only clutch that will modify the effect of engine braking is the kind referred to as a "slipper" clutch.  That name is cross-applied to a couple of different types in other motorsports, but in motorcycles (other than pure drag bikes), it refers to what is properly known as a "back torque limiting" clutch.  These have a one way clutch built into them on which all or part of the clutch plates ride.  The one-way clutch holds under drive loads, but either slips under heavy deceleration to prevent a sudden loss of traction on throttle release, or they freewheel altogether, depending on the layout.  Most of them are otherwise manually operated, and are very seldom used in dirt bikes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although I don't ride competitive mx I prefer to engine brake over freewheeling. That said I freewheel more now because I'm afraid excessive engine braking will damage my 2t because high rpm and not the fuel/oil required for that rpm.

Someone tell me if I'm worried for nothing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought I read something about coming into a corner with less rpms makes the bike turn easier... wouldnt this be the same as freewheeling into a corner?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Somewhat, yes, but that notion is based on the very highly questionable assertion that there is a significant gyroscopic stabilizing effect on the chassis from the rotating mass of the engine.  But think about it: If that were true. you should be able to come to a stop and not put your feet down as long as the engine was spinning at say, 5000 RPM, no?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×