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Shinko 705 Commuting Tire Pressure

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Tried doing the research on google and TT, couldn't find what I was looking for.

2003 (KLX) DRZ400S

Shinko 705 front + rear

 

-Rear tire lists 41psi cold @  585lbs max (tubed tire)

-Front tire: no psi listing, (tubeless tire)

 

Some people are saying lower psi (high 20s - low 30s) eat up/destroy life of tire; as early as 3k miles.

Some people are saying running higher psi (35+psi - 41psi) prolong life of tire; but may be dangerous?

 

Most of my rides are 5-7 miles stints (<10 min), with the occasional 30min rides.

I'm looking for safety, best MPG, whilst not too concerned about comfort.

 

Any input?

Thanks TT!

Edited by mxLr8

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Low PSI is great for traction, but horrible for tire life. I had a Pilot Power be gone in under 3k miles because I never checked the tire pressure and ran it at 18 PSI the entire time I had it on the bike. 41 PSI is the standard recommended pressure for most normal tires. Depending on what you're looking to get out of the tire (grip, longevity, ect) it will vary. I've run my tires at 50 PSI when I'm using it for a long trip, then when I went to tail of the dragon I let then down to 25.

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Low PSI is great for traction, but horrible for tire life. I had a Pilot Power be gone in under 3k miles because I never checked the tire pressure and ran it at 18 PSI the entire time I had it on the bike. 41 PSI is the standard recommended pressure for most normal tires. Depending on what you're looking to get out of the tire (grip, longevity, ect) it will vary. I've run my tires at 50 PSI when I'm using it for a long trip, then when I went to tail of the dragon I let then down to 25.

 

Low PSI = great traction, low tire life

High PSI = longer life, less traction. So 41 PSI should be ok...

 

Thanks for the input brother. I think I'm starting to understand the theory behind it!

Edited by mxLr8

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41 psi !  Not saying you can't run tires that high, but sh*t I don't think I've seen any MC running pressures that high.  I'd say for the street anywhere from twenty — mid-thirties is normal.

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41 psi !  Not saying you can't run tires that high, but sh*t I don't think I've seen any MC running pressures that high.  I'd say for the street anywhere from twenty — mid-thirties is normal.

 

 

Low PSI is great for traction, but horrible for tire life. I had a Pilot Power be gone in under 3k miles because I never checked the tire pressure and ran it at 18 PSI the entire time I had it on the bike. 41 PSI is the standard recommended pressure for most normal tires. Depending on what you're looking to get out of the tire (grip, longevity, ect) it will vary. I've run my tires at 50 PSI when I'm using it for a long trip, then when I went to tail of the dragon I let then down to 25.

 

The vast differences between these opinions is exactly why I brought up this thread. Thank you both for your input. Anyone else want to chime in? Just trying to make the best decision!...  :ride:

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Every MC tire I've ever mounted has the recommended PSI to be anywhere from 40-43 PSI. If the tire says it's rated for that PSI there's no reason you can't run the tire at that pressure.

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Every MC tire I've ever mounted has the recommended PSI to be anywhere from 40-43 PSI. If the tire says it's rated for that PSI there's no reason you can't run the tire at that pressure.

 

You mean the pressure listed on the tire?  That pressure usually is in reference to the tire's load index, i.e., the maximum allowed load that the tire can carry safely with the tire inflated to that pressure.  I look at it as the maximum pressure/load allowed for the tire.  Each vehicle is different and places a different load on its tires.  I would stick with the manufacturer's recommended tire pressures (based on load) and make changes a few psi +/- till I'm satisfied with the handling.

 

Suzuki's recommendation is:

 

S: 18 psi (F) & 22-25 psi (R')

SM: 25 psi (F) & 29-33 psi (R')

Edited by bmwpowere36m3

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the psi on the sidewall is in relation to the load range specified on the tire.  That same tire could be mounted on a lightweight DS or a heavy two up cruiser.  If the tire is rated for 950lbs at 40 psi?  does your klx weigh that much?  40 would be over inflated.

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The vast differences between these opinions is exactly why I brought up this thread. Thank you both for your input. Anyone else want to chime in? Just trying to make the best decision!...  :ride:

 

Obviously running higher pressures will increase tire life, but to what point?  At some point the tire will be over-inflated, probably wear like crazy down the middle and generally suck for traction and cornering... same with under-inflating it.  Personally I rather run the "right" pressure where the bike handles well and I get decent mileage out of the tire.  Mileage will also be highly dependent on tire choice (knobbies, sport, touring).  Are you planning on riding lots of miles in a straight line (highway miles)?

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Some good input/output going on here.

 

the psi on the sidewall is in relation to the load range specified on the tire.  That same tire could be mounted on a lightweight DS or a heavy two up cruiser.  If the tire is rated for 950lbs at 40 psi?  does your klx weigh that much?  40 would be over inflated.

 

-Rear tire lists 41psi cold @  585lbs max (tubed tire)

(WIKI) DRZ400 weight = 319 wet

 

 

Obviously running higher pressures will increase tire life, but to what point?  At some point the tire will be over-inflated, probably wear like crazy down the middle and generally suck for traction and cornering... same with under-inflating it.  Personally I rather run the "right" pressure where the bike handles well and I get decent mileage out of the tire.  Mileage will also be highly dependent on tire choice (knobbies, sport, touring).  Are you planning on riding lots of miles in a straight line (highway miles)?

 

Shinko 705 are supposed to be 80/20 street/dirt.

Will be used for commuting.

Surface streets (traffic lights), ranging from 0-45mph @ 10-15min. Occasional 75mph for the interstate, which only lasts around 15min.

So yes, mostly in straight lines, with the exception of left/right hand turns. AKA, no "twisties".

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41 psi !  Not saying you can't run tires that high, but sh*t I don't think I've seen any MC running pressures that high.  I'd say for the street anywhere from twenty — mid-thirties is normal.

 

 

check more bike's tire pressure. you'll find the guys that know what tires need (and weight more than 110 lbs with gear) will run proper pressures, from 34-40ish lbs. and enjoy long running tires. 

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check more bike's tire pressure. you'll find the guys that know what tires need (and weight more than 110 lbs with gear) will run proper pressures, from 34-40ish lbs. and enjoy long running tires. 

 

Thanks og. I weigh about 155 with my "commuting" gear on. So I suppose I'll run it at 38psi; see how that goes.

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I'm running 705s on my bike right now. I commute 18 miles round trip every day in the city. I'm running 25 rear and 18 front like it sez on the little tag on my rear fender. Can't tell you how many miles are on this set, but I've had them well over a year, and have had very little wear. They have been MUCH better than any other tire I've ever run on the street. But they suck off road. I have a spare wheel set I run Shinko 700s on. But only in the winter when it dips below 105 degrees around here.

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Too low pressures will eat up a tire fast and can cup the tread in a day - that said, too high and you're giving up traction and comfort for no good reason.

 

Coming up 40 years of riding here. I run 40 pounds front and back on my street bike - it weighs almost 900 pounds on it's own! That's the pressure it's happy at and I don't get cupping at all. Have been running mid twenties rear and low twenties front on the drzS (for commuting purposes) - it seems happy there and the wear is looking normal. You basically need to play with more and less pressure on your own bike and get the feel of it while watching for anything wearing un-normally.

 

Just my .02 - your mileage may vary

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The best thing you can do is look in your owners manual for tire pressures.  I run mine at that setting - 22 R and 18 F - and they work just fine.  I also have an FZ1, and the manual AND the dealer say to run them 42 rear and 38 front.  I have done that religiously and have only replaced the tires 3 times in 26,000 miles and have never left the road due to lost traction on either bike.

 

jim

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