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2013 DRZ400s Sprocket change--Very Difficult!

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I went to change my rear sprocket on my 2013 DRZ tonight to a 48 tooth, and found out that Suzuki is now using the Amelock nut, instead of a top lock flange or nylock nut.  The axle nut is also a Amelock nut as well (instead of a castle nut w/cotter pin), and makes removal UNNECESSARILY difficult! I was not able to remove the sprocket because I rounded off the hex key I was using, and the 12mm wrench was rounding off the amelock nuts.  Anyone have a tip on how to remove the nuts easier?  If you are unware of what a Amelock nut is...here is a link.

 

http://www.amecoil.com/products/9-25/miscellaneous-fastenings/amelock-self-locking-nut.html

 

I hate having unfinished projects in the garage, so hopefully someone can help me out.  I'm very close to taking the tire and wheel to the dealer and asking them to try and get the nuts off.

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that is strange but hopefully you havnet stripped the teeth on the bolts. 

 

you can try heating the bolts a little and then loosen them again. or hit them with wd40 and get a new hex key obviously.

as for the rounded off 12mm they make sockets that will dig into the nut and grab it and loosen it (youre gonna need a new 12mm nut). theyre called turbo sockets. i picked a kit up at my local ace hardware so theyre easy to find.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ZP05y32aJw

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never had a problem, and impact wrench and penetrating oil are your friend. there have been cases of stripped hex nuts here and there but nothing a torch and a impact couldn't handle

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I found it more difficult then it should be but did not round any nuts or Allan keys. Use oversized wrenches that give you more leverage so it is easier to keep all angles square. No stripping then.

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I went to change my rear sprocket on my 2013 DRZ tonight to a 48 tooth, and found out that Suzuki is now using the Amelock nut, instead of a top lock flange or nylock nut.  The axle nut is also a Amelock nut as well (instead of a castle nut w/cotter pin), and makes removal UNNECESSARILY difficult! I was not able to remove the sprocket because I rounded off the hex key I was using, and the 12mm wrench was rounding off the amelock nuts.  Anyone have a tip on how to remove the nuts easier?  If you are unware of what a Amelock nut is...here is a link.

 

 

I went to change my rear sprocket on my 2013 DRZ tonight to a 48 tooth, and found out that Suzuki is now using the Amelock nut, instead of a top lock flange or nylock nut.  The axle nut is also a Amelock nut as well (instead of a castle nut w/cotter pin), and makes removal UNNECESSARILY difficult! I was not able to remove the sprocket because I rounded off the hex key I was using, and the 12mm wrench was rounding off the amelock nuts.  Anyone have a tip on how to remove the nuts easier?  If you are unware of what a Amelock nut is...here is a link.

 

http://www.amecoil.com/products/9-25/miscellaneous-fastenings/amelock-self-locking-nut.html

 

I hate having unfinished projects in the garage, so hopefully someone can help me out.  I'm very close to taking the tire and wheel to the dealer and asking them to try and get the nuts off.

 

 

I hate having unfinished projects in the garage, so hopefully someone can help me out.  I'm very close to taking the tire and wheel to the dealer and asking them to try and get the nuts off.

The hex key is used ONLY to hold the fastener, the nut is what is loosened.. it's that way no matter if Fuji loc nuts are used, nlylocks  or any other style.

 

Nut is loosened best with a 6 point box end wrench, of quality design (Harbor Freight tools need not apply). 

 

Shocking the nut loose by fitting a properly fitted 6 point box end wrench, holding the fastener with the hex key and striking the wrench end with a soft faced dead blow hammer is effective as well... but will irritate your snap on dealer if he sees you do it. 

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The above suggestions are all good and like signit98 says use nuts and bolts that that can be tightened and un-tightened.

 

I know I'm always out there when it comes to this sort of thing but Suzuki like all other mfg wants to make sure that everything holds together during the warranty period. If you have a problem taking something apart.. thats your problem not theirs.

 

I'm old and generally I keep things for a long time. I have some sport cars that I've had for over 50 years and some motorcycles for over 25 years. So, every time I take something  apart, I always use anti-sieze grease when I put it back together and that goes for sprockets and rotors as well. Sometimes the first time I take something apart it may be a problem. I always do the suggestions  as above. I find the right tools and take my time taking it apart  because once you start messing it up... it only gets worse.

 

Tony

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On flat head countersunk bolts you turn the nut not the bolt or you'll round off the slot/hex like you just did. It doesn't help that the hex nuts are made of play-doh, I used a set of small vise-grips when I rounded off the first two bolts and nuts (I'm a quick learner :goofy: ).

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One thing I might add to Marquez's and Rinoracer's points is that with sprockets that are hard to come apart for the first time it's always good to start with a bolt that will come apart. Take it off. Find a hex bolt with nut and a couple of washers. anti-sieze the bolt and stick it back in the hole that's now empty. Thighten it back down again and go on the bolt right next to it. If that doesn't seem to want to come off go to the next one. If that comes off.... grease it up put it back on.... and go back to the one in the middle. A good practice with hard to remove sprockets and rotors is to grease up and reinstall the ones that do come off until theyr'e all off.

 

Sometimes it just takes time and patience.

 

Tony 

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if you bikes on the ground just put it in gear, and break loose the NUT side, it should pretty easily break loose..

i also stripped out a few sprockets bolts on mine and a friends sm trying to loosen the HEX side..

 

incase you did strip the sprocket bolts and want to replace heres a link $11 for a set
http://www.ebay.com/itm/MSR-IRONMAN-REAR-SPROCKET-BOLT-KIT-6-BOLTS-BK-1-/380694140250?pt=Motorcycles_Parts_Accessories&fits=Model%3ADRZ400SM&hash=item58a323955a&vxp=mtr

Edited by 707LAKE

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E.Marquez Is right on, but I'd also like to throw out that you should be using a decent set of allen head sockets, I bought this set from lowes, it's got every size you'll need on the drz and the quality of this set blows any allen key key out of the water.  (Not that you should be using the allen head to break the nut loose!)

 

http://www.lowes.com/pd_338622-22328-85225_0__?productId=3387788&Ntt=kobalt+allen+head+socket+set&pl=1&currentURL=%3FNtt%3Dkobalt%2Ballen%2Bhead%2Bsocket%2Bset&facetInfo=

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6 point?.....nope use a 12 point, I rounded two of mine with a 6 point. Someone here suggested a 12 point and with that I got the rest off with zero problems. For the two that were rounded I cut the nuts off with a dremel & cutting wheel.

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Might have been something wrong with your six point. Any hex nut  that takes an effort to loosten should always be done with a 6 point.

 

That's why impact sockets are always 6 point and not 12 point.

 

Tony

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6 point?.....nope use a 12 point, I rounded two of mine with a 6 point. Someone here suggested a 12 point and with that I got the rest off with zero problems. For the two that were rounded I cut the nuts off with a dremel & cutting wheel.

Cheap ill fitting tools get erratic results.

 

The proper tool is a quality properly fit 6 point box end wrench and a quality properly fit hex key. 

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The above suggestions are all good and like signit98 says use nuts and bolts that that can be tightened and un-tightened.

 

I know I'm always out there when it comes to this sort of thing but Suzuki like all other mfg wants to make sure that everything holds together during the warranty period. If you have a problem taking something apart.. thats your problem not theirs.

 

I'm old and generally I keep things for a long time. I have some sport cars that I've had for over 50 years and some motorcycles for over 25 years. So, every time I take something  apart, I always use anti-sieze grease when I put it back together and that goes for sprockets and rotors as well. Sometimes the first time I take something apart it may be a problem. I always do the suggestions  as above. I find the right tools and take my time taking it apart  because once you start messing it up... it only gets worse.

 

Tony

 

 

anti-seize has it's place, i'm a fan. for things you don't want coming apart, use loctite. it also prevents corrosion, as a very nice side benefit. 

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Well...they are all craftsman and yes I know the quality over the last decade has gone down some, but I wouldn't call them cheap. I agree a 6 point should have been the right one, but the 12 worked much better...maybe the nuts were outsourced &  forged in Iraq? ;)

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anti-seize has it's place, i'm a fan. for things you don't want coming apart, use loctite. it also prevents corrosion, as a very nice side benefit. 

You use what you want and I'll use what I want. For most things I use anti sieze.and Nylock nuts. Every time I change my tires I check my rotors and sprockets. Haven't had a problem yet with them loostening over time or taking them apart. I'm always changing wheels on my DRZs The SMs need a different front rotor and rear rotor some I'm always taking them apart anyway. 

 

Locktite has a very good place for things that need it. There is a thread on page one right now about a rider that stripped his output shaft.

 

He should have been using locktite. Red on the output shaft to fill in all the voids between the CS sprocket and the shaft. Blue[my method] on the CS nut. (I don't see why the nut would need red].

 

I think with the non vibrating DRZ motor Locktite is usually over prescribed.

 

Good example..

 

The Gold valve people..[RT]

 

Got the Gold valves. Spec sheet [and maybe even the movie] said use blue Locktite when replacing the valve body nut.

 

So what do they send me?.. a small vial of RED.. Even after they go thru a bit of time in the video explaining the VB shaft is hollow and care must be taken when installing or removing the nut.

 

Go to their web site and what does one of the pictures show... The standard nuts replaced with Nylocks.

 

Even their engineers can't make up there minds on what to use.

 

So, like I said......You use what you want and I'll use what I want. There really doesn't seem to be a clear consensus.

 

Tony

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