Video: How To Change Rear Brake Drum Shoes - CRF150F

Not my best work, but I hope it at least helps others!

I have a ratchet that looks a lot like your axle hammer....lol.

 

FYI on a few things here. You will never have to fight with axle removal or installation if you only lift the bike enough to take the weight off the wheel. If you jack it up as you remove the axle you will find the sweet spot where the axle just pulls out as easy as can be....and the wheel will not fall down. No need to beat on it with a ratchet, hammer, boulder, or the neighbors dog. Having the wheel all the way off the ground is the hard way because all the wheels weight is on the axle you are trying to extract.

 

It's always best to do a complete brake service...if it's worth doing it worth doing right....no? You neglected to clean the backing plate of brake dust and you didn't remove the brake cam to clean it and apply new grease to it, you missed the opportunity to grease the brake shoe pivot post and apply high temperature brake grease or anti seize compound to the backing plate pads where the brake shoes contact the backing plate. You should always use emery cloth to deglaze the brake drum and go over the new shoes too, to remove the grease from your hands before reinstalling the brake assembly into the hub. You should have also cleaned the axle and applied a light coat of grease to the axle and wheel spacers too. If you do this the next time it will come apart like a hot knife through butter. Did you rotate the axle bearings by hand while you had the wheel off to check for roughness or excess play? How about a torque wrench so you don't smash the life out of the axle bearings over tightening the axle nut? Hard to tell from the video but I'm not so sure the brake shoe springs are attached properly.

 

Tech25

Edited by Tech25

I have a ratchet that looks a lot like your axle hammer....lol.

FYI on a few things here. You will never have to fight with axle removal or installation if you only lift the bike enough to take the weight off the wheel. If you jack it up as you remove the axle you will find the sweet spot where the axle just pulls out as easy as can be....and the wheel will not fall down. No need to beat on it with a ratchet, hammer, boulder, or the neighbors dog. Having the wheel all the way off the ground is the hard way because all the wheels weight is on the axle you are trying to extract.

It's always best to do a complete brake service...if it's worth doing it worth doing right....no? You neglected to clean the backing plate of brake dust and you didn't remove the brake cam to clean it and apply new grease to it, you missed the opportunity to grease the brake shoe pivot post and apply high temperature brake grease or anti seize compound to the backing plate pads where the brake shoes contact the backing plate. You should always use emery cloth to deglaze the brake drum and go over the new shoes too, to remove the grease from your hands before reinstalling the brake assembly into the hub. You should have also cleaned the axle and applied a light coat of grease to the axle and wheel spacers too. If you do this the next time it will come apart like a hot knife through butter. Did you rotate the axle bearings by hand while you had the wheel off to check for roughness or excess play? How about a torque wrench so you don't smash the life out of the axle bearings over tightening the axle nut? Hard to tell from the video but I'm not so sure the brake shoe springs are attached properly.

Tech25

Thank you very much for the tips! After reading your comment, I regret not re greasing everything. But Im not going to the track anytime soon, but I will be sure to go over everything before I go.

-Matt

You did good, as with anything in life there's a learning curve. If you need help all you need to do is ask.

Tech25

Easy way to remove or install brake shoes:

 

On one shoe, half way from its ends pry the shoe away from the  backing plate, if you can't do this by hand use a screw driver to pry it away from the backing plate.  When the shoe is lifted it releases tension on the springs and both shoes are easily removed. 

 

Clean the anchor pin and the operating cam, and then put a dab of water proof grease on each.

 

Assemble the new shoes and springs. Bend the two shoes to almost 90 degrees, like when you removed the old shoes. Then place the shoes over the anchor and cam,  push the shoes flat against the backing plate.  This is reverse of how you removed the old shoes.  Sometimes the shoes won't snap behind the flanges on the ends of the anchor and cam, a gentle push with a tool and the shoes will pop home.

Actually, you should use a "thing that looks like a screwdriver" rather than a real screwdriver to pry the shoes away from the backing plate. Using a good screwdriver as a pry tool ruins the blade. Paint can openers are cheap, or you can use a tire iron.

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