Front wheel losing traction.

Front wheel was sliding out and put this down to the old Dunlop 208 front tyre.
Replaced the tyre and have about 700kms on the new one now. (Dunlop Q2).
 
When taking hard left or right handers the wheel seems to lose traction and slide while in the apex of the corner.
 
Is this just the characteristics of the tyre not being suited to this bike or is it a suspension related issue?
 
This video is just an example of a small loss of traction when taking a corner.

There have been much closer calls then this.
 

Any other people have similar problems or know what I could do to stop this happening before i come off on a corner.
 
Cheers.

Edited by harry9395

please list the pressure of front tire and all suspension settings including rear sag and the size of your rear tire

 

bike geometry, suspension setup or rider could cause this problem, it' s not easy  to tell without infos.

Edited by 30x26

Front wheel pressure is 27.

Suspension is as it came stock. I weigh 80kgs with gear.

Isn't 27 pretty high for front pressure?

I run Bridgestone Battlax S20's with about 25-26psi with no issues....., yet.

 

With that said, I have re-valved suspension from RG3 from the previous owner. It also has an Ohlins rear shock. I have no idea what it was setup for, but it seems to be setup up pretty well for my weight(225lbs).

 

Back to the tire pressure, I would lower the front pressure to 25psi and work from there. I was given 25psi as a starting point from a few amateur supermoto riders. They had also indicated that they run a bit less pressure in the front when compared to the rear. They had also said that on the track they run pressures as low as 18psi.

 

In general when you lower tire pressures, you increase grip... to a point. Lower pressure also helps generate heat in the tire more quickly.

 

Oh and make sure your up on the tank, not literally, but in an aggressive riding posture to get weight up on the front tire. You may also want to verify the rear sag and make sure it isn't too low. That could cause the lightness in the front end, making the front tire wash out.

 

Please, someone correct me if I'm  wrong.... I don't want to spread misinformation.

 

This is just things I have found in my experiences, I am in no way an expert.

Edited by MThompsonjr115

Tire compounds make a huge difference on the tarmac along with air pressure and rider position. Anyone else think to much SPEED in the corners could be the problem??? ;) JK

Along with what was said, you can also try to increase (slower, turn adjuster clockwise) the rebound a few clicks on the forks. Rebound on the forks, to a great extent, controls cornering. Too little rebound and the bike tends to go wide and too much the bike cuts corners (oversteer). Also rear sag and the fork's height in the triple clamps will affect this.

Edited by bmwpowere36m3

Make sure your steering head bearings are in good cond and adjusted correctly

Front wheel was sliding out and put this down to the old Dunlop 208 front tyre.

Replaced the tyre and have about 700kms on the new one now. (Dunlop Q2).

 

When taking hard left or right handers the wheel seems to lose traction and slide while in the apex of the corner.

 

Is this just the characteristics of the tyre not being suited to this bike or is it a suspension related issue?

 

This video is just an example of a small loss of traction when taking a corner.

There have been much closer calls then this.

 

Any other people have similar problems or know what I could do to stop this happening before i come off on a corner.

 

Cheers.

 

 

that road looks wet, or greasy, or both. go back and look at it again, it looks slick as heck ! 

 

 

also, why are you pushing the bike into the road ? YOU are supposed to be leaning with the bike, or hanging off, not sitting upright and pushing the bike down into the turn. i'm really not surprised the tire lost traction with the bike leaned that far over. sounds (video shake too) like you caught the slide with your foot, instead of keeping it on the pegs. are you normally dragging your feet around turns like this one ? that's a bad idea ! 

 

take pictures of your tire's edges, i think you'll find at least a mark from that day from sliding if it hasn't been too long. it will be right on the edge.

Edited by ohgood

Pushing down is how you ride a supermoto.

I would start with tire pressure. Lowest I've gone on a dot was 22 cold. Slicks are different. I'd say not enough heat in the tire too. My drz would stick great at the track but on the street same exact tire I've had the push issue. A true supermoto tire will be setup for the lighter bike also. You need to check bearings suspension etc also but first guess is no heat in the tire. Road does look slick too.

FYI the drz has more weight on the rear so you do need to slide up.

that road looks wet, or greasy, or both. go back and look at it again, it looks slick as heck !

also, why are you pushing the bike into the road ? YOU are supposed to be leaning with the bike, or hanging off, not sitting upright and pushing the bike down into the turn. i'm really not surprised the tire lost traction with the bike leaned that far over. sounds (video shake too) like you caught the slide with your foot, instead of keeping it on the pegs. are you normally dragging your feet around turns like this one ? that's a bad idea !

take pictures of your tire's edges, i think you'll find at least a mark from that day from sliding if it hasn't been too long. it will be right on the edge.

hey, before this turns into a 'but supermoto is different/better' or 'i always drag my foot to feel the track' or some other sillyness...

 

 

this is a street bike, on the street, with a brick wall at the apex of the turn, not soft cushy grass or pea gravel. 

 

pushing the bike down in these conditions is -wrong-. 

I agree there are different body positions and styles for each turn. I could just as easily say the same for leaning below the bike. Would I push down in that turn? Probably not. Do I push down on the street? Yes in some turns. Can we say that one style is right? Nope. While pushing down does use more of the tire side wall, if the pressure is right and there is heat in the tire there shouldn't be an issue. To me at higher speeds on the street I wouldn't push down, but I'm not telling him its wrong cause everyone is different. Most turns require constant adjustment of body position. The one thing we can say is weight needs to be up front. Everything else is opinion.

hey, before this turns into a 'but supermoto is different/better' or 'i always drag my foot to feel the track' or some other sillyness...

this is a street bike, on the street, with a brick wall at the apex of the turn, not soft cushy grass or pea gravel.

pushing the bike down in these conditions is -wrong-.

Thanks for all the comments.

This turn was just an example of what happens in a corner rather then the actual problem itself.

From what it sounds like I just need more weight towards the front of the bike, further up the seat and to gradually wear in the edges of my tyre.

I would say that it is likely your suspension setup.  I was recently having similar issues with a sportbike of mine and had to play with both the front and rear settings to get it to turn properly.  It is a lot of trial and error but it will get there.  My front end was pushing hard- ended up having to increase the compression slightly on the front and the dampning in the back.  Just take it slowly- make a change, mark down what you did, go for a ride and mark down the results, then repeat until you hit the setup that suits you best.

Thanks for all the comments.

This turn was just an example of what happens in a corner rather then the actual problem itself.

From what it sounds like I just need more weight towards the front of the bike, further up the seat and to gradually wear in the edges of my tyre.

 

100% lower your tire pressure though.  25psi is a good base point as long as its not cold out, like above 40-50f you will be in the 24-26psi range.  And remember if the tires were not SM specific then they are made for heavier bikes, so you will have a harder time getting heat into them.  For what its worth on one of my track bikes, suspension setup perfectly by a pro, i still had this issue and had to play around with tire pressure(tire choice) and riding style to get rid of the slide/chatter.  I found that some tires just didnt work well on my bike because of the geometry(not the drz). 

Thanks for all the comments.

This turn was just an example of what happens in a corner rather then the actual problem itself.

From what it sounds like I just need more weight towards the front of the bike, further up the seat and to gradually wear in the edges of my tyre.

 

you need to set your sag at 85mm adding some preload. probably at the moment you are running 95-100mm, 10-15mm make  a difference.

you can go lower on pressure, try 24-25.

 

i hate tires with such a stiff carcass, q2 work really well in ideal conditions (track or street) but imho are junk when you are riding on bumpy everyday roads. they are not able to damp bumps and loose traction soon. using that tire (or bridgestone s-20) i think that you can noticeably increase your street grip removing about 1 turn from compression damping on the fork. probably 5 clicks from fully open work fine, giving more confidence and planted feeling. 

q2 warm up slowly (s-20 are much faster), take your time before turning hard.

Edited by 30x26

attend an msf course and/or watch the dvd "twist of the wrist". every aspect of supermoto/sportbike/motorcycle riding is a science.

Edited by mxLr8

Front wheel pressure is 27.

Suspension is as it came stock. I weigh 80kgs with gear.

What is rear pressure?

Front and rear pressures together are important to know.

 

I run no higher than 22psi in the front and around 25psi in the rear. You need to experiment but I always run the front at least 2 psi lower than the rear.

Edited by Positron007

you need to set your sag at 85mm adding some preload. probably at the moment you are running 95-100mm, 10-15mm make  a difference.

you can go lower on pressure, try 24-25.

 

i hate tires with such a stiff carcass, q2 work really well in ideal conditions (track or street) but imho are junk when you are riding on bumpy everyday roads. they are not able to damp bumps and loose traction soon. using that tire (or bridgestone s-20) i think that you can noticeably increase your street grip removing about 1 turn from compression damping on the fork. probably 5 clicks from fully open work fine, giving more confidence and planted feeling. 

q2 warm up slowly (s-20 are much faster), take your time before turning hard.

This^  I actually run my rear sag even tighter (75mm)...gets more weight on the front end.

Practice......

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