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some of these bikes are a little cheaper, is their quality hindered by this??? who's rode a husky!!???

 

interesting price on a "cr125" idk how they can call it that now... but yea 2013 husky "cr125" $3,999 on FTR, its a listing for a dealership selling them at that price.

 

if its anything like a jap 2-stroke 125 cant be a bad deal.... I know nothing about huskys trying to do some research now! thanks
 

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Sex drips from those bikes. Add a big bore kit and Lectron carb and you have Gods gift to the dirtbiker. Though after the 2014 model year the game changes for the worse.

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For one, they are pretty good bikes, their 2 strokes dont get updated as much as other brands. But the CR125 is a good bike and a steal at that price. They come with a big bore kit which is pretty awesome. Also Husky came out with the "CR" name long before Honda so I dont know why its surprising to you its called that. My buddies dad has Many Husky CR models from the late 60's and early 70's. Also Sabortooth why do you think it changes for the worse after 2014? they will be designed by KTM. I dont own a KTM but my buddies KTM200XC is an awesome bike, so much easier to work on and better engineered then my YZ250. I see this as a huge plus for Husky, i might even consider buying one.

Edited by CDBiker220
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I just bought one, sold an 08 YZ 125 for it.

 

Do not be discouraged by the 'cheap' price - the reason why they're cheap is KTM gave huge incentives to Husky dealers to clear the inventory because KTM bought Husky, and they want to implement their design in 2015 (i believe).

 

They're just as good as any japanese bike, and they're actually MORE reliable. The engine/transmission/clutch is much more 'robust' than the japanese bikes or KTM bikes. You can install a 144 kit, or there's even a mod to a 165 kit which everyone seems to LOVE when they install it - the engine has no issues running this big bore kit. I love the versatility.

 

Here are my 1st impressions of the bike after coming off of an 08 YZ 125. The biggest thing you'll need to do to this bike is a revalve. And install that 144 kit. Those 2 things will solve any issues I've found with the bike... read up:

 

I don't regret buying this bike at all - I think it'll be perfect once I get it set up for me. Read up on Cafe Husky forums.

 

 

First ride on my 2012 CR125. Trail riding in wet conditions in Pennsylvania 80% humid 70 degrees elev 2000. My last bike was an 08 YZ 125. I'm 5'-10" 160 lbs with 12 years riding experience. Use maxima 927, 32:1 with 93 octane pump gas.

Day 1

Impressions - The Good: great ergonomics, feels light in the woods, great brakes - way stronger than the YZ. Engine is strong, but narrower than the yz.

The bad: forks/shock are way stiff for trails. I felt every root and bump. The rear felt unsettled and couldn't get consistent traction coming out of turns and going over roots. Front end tends to push on exit of turns too. I tried tweaking the fork damping, it's a work in progress. I'm hoping to work out the problems by tuning and without a revalve (no $ for it at the moment). --- jetting is off - bog at wide open and stutter at 1/4 to 1/2 throttle.

Great bike so far, I look forward to learning it and tuning. Any suggestions for suspension and jetting?


Day 2

Forks
Backed the fork compression out 6 clicks and the rebound 2 clicks from their stock position. It helped with going over roots on turns and seemed to have much better traction around turns and through berms. The rear end still feels a little loose going around flat turns, I think changing the geometry by lowering the forks will help, along with tuning the shock (which I haven't touched yet). The conditions I was riding in also weren't great for rear end traction. It's still a work in progress, but it's improved dramatically - I don't feel like the front end is going to wash out at any given second like on Day 1. I think I can tune to something that's 'good' for my application (woods 95% of the time, MX track 5%), not as good as what it'd be with a revalve however. I still haven't touched the shock, didn't have time, and I want to do one thing at a time (I realize shock/fork tuning are dependent on eachother, but they have to be in the ballpark first and the shock doesn't seem awful, it does need to be softer though too).

Transmission
The gear ratios are unusual. I got a chance to open it up on long straight (dirt road). When speed shifting I originally thought the bike was bogging or couldn't stay on the pipe for some reason. I realized though that the drop in RPM I was feeling was due to the gears being too far apart. I had to feather the clutch at each shift to keep it on the pipe. It was weird. This could be why I perceived the engine to have a narrower power band in comparison to the YZ. As a correction to that, I think it has good low end and mid, maybe even more than the YZ, but the gear ratios are way too broad which is why it falls off the pipe easily. I'm hoping a 144 is enough to bridge the gap between the wide ratios. I'm optimistic. I've never felt a bike that was geared like this before, it's just too broad for the 125. I'm running stock sprockets, which I believe is 13/50.

Misc.

What a weird fuel valve. My brother in law couldn't figure out why the bike stalled after riding it for 5 minutes (ran out of gas in the float bowl, and the fuel was turned off). Once he realized, he couldn't figure out how to turn the gas on - it was pretty funny as I walked 100 yards to turn the gas on for him.

I love the brakes, and the clutch - very smooth.

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 Sabortooth why do you think it changes for the worse after 2014? they will be designed by KTM. I dont own a KTM but my buddies KTM200XC is an awesome bike, so much easier to work on and better engineered then my YZ250. I see this as a huge plus for Husky, i might even consider buying one.

 KTM will drop these these little motors from their line up and rebadge Husabergs into Huskys. I will venture to say that my 2011 model WR made in Italy, will live longer than a 2015 KTM/Husaberg/Husqvarna creation.

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I just bought one, sold an 08 YZ 125 for it.

 

Do not be discouraged by the 'cheap' price - the reason why they're cheap is KTM gave huge incentives to Husky dealers to clear the inventory because KTM bought Husky, and they want to implement their design in 2015 (i believe).

 

They're just as good as any japanese bike, and they're actually MORE reliable. The engine/transmission/clutch is much more 'robust' than the japanese bikes or KTM bikes. You can install a 144 kit, or there's even a mod to a 165 kit which everyone seems to LOVE when they install it - the engine has no issues running this big bore kit. I love the versatility.

 

Here are my 1st impressions of the bike after coming off of an 08 YZ 125. The biggest thing you'll need to do to this bike is a revalve. And install that 144 kit. Those 2 things will solve any issues I've found with the bike... read up:

 

I don't regret buying this bike at all - I think it'll be perfect once I get it set up for me. Read up on Cafe Husky forums.

 

 

First ride on my 2012 CR125. Trail riding in wet conditions in Pennsylvania 80% humid 70 degrees elev 2000. My last bike was an 08 YZ 125. I'm 5'-10" 160 lbs with 12 years riding experience. Use maxima 927, 32:1 with 93 octane pump gas.

Day 1

Impressions - The Good: great ergonomics, feels light in the woods, great brakes - way stronger than the YZ. Engine is strong, but narrower than the yz.

The bad: forks/shock are way stiff for trails. I felt every root and bump. The rear felt unsettled and couldn't get consistent traction coming out of turns and going over roots. Front end tends to push on exit of turns too. I tried tweaking the fork damping, it's a work in progress. I'm hoping to work out the problems by tuning and without a revalve (no $ for it at the moment). --- jetting is off - bog at wide open and stutter at 1/4 to 1/2 throttle.

Great bike so far, I look forward to learning it and tuning. Any suggestions for suspension and jetting?

Day 2

Forks

Backed the fork compression out 6 clicks and the rebound 2 clicks from their stock position. It helped with going over roots on turns and seemed to have much better traction around turns and through berms. The rear end still feels a little loose going around flat turns, I think changing the geometry by lowering the forks will help, along with tuning the shock (which I haven't touched yet). The conditions I was riding in also weren't great for rear end traction. It's still a work in progress, but it's improved dramatically - I don't feel like the front end is going to wash out at any given second like on Day 1. I think I can tune to something that's 'good' for my application (woods 95% of the time, MX track 5%), not as good as what it'd be with a revalve however. I still haven't touched the shock, didn't have time, and I want to do one thing at a time (I realize shock/fork tuning are dependent on eachother, but they have to be in the ballpark first and the shock doesn't seem awful, it does need to be softer though too).

Transmission

The gear ratios are unusual. I got a chance to open it up on long straight (dirt road). When speed shifting I originally thought the bike was bogging or couldn't stay on the pipe for some reason. I realized though that the drop in RPM I was feeling was due to the gears being too far apart. I had to feather the clutch at each shift to keep it on the pipe. It was weird. This could be why I perceived the engine to have a narrower power band in comparison to the YZ. As a correction to that, I think it has good low end and mid, maybe even more than the YZ, but the gear ratios are way too broad which is why it falls off the pipe easily. I'm hoping a 144 is enough to bridge the gap between the wide ratios. I'm optimistic. I've never felt a bike that was geared like this before, it's just too broad for the 125. I'm running stock sprockets, which I believe is 13/50.

Misc.

What a weird fuel valve. My brother in law couldn't figure out why the bike stalled after riding it for 5 minutes (ran out of gas in the float bowl, and the fuel was turned off). Once he realized, he couldn't figure out how to turn the gas on - it was pretty funny as I walked 100 yards to turn the gas on for him.

I love the brakes, and the clutch - very smooth.

 

 Good write up.

The CR forks will need to be resprung and valved to work in the woods, but when completed you will be amazed of how smooth the the whole package becomes. I ride rocks and hills and could not imagine a better tool for the job. When you can, bump up to the 165 kit and Hold On. The power is explosive and the weight doesn't change. This will also clean up the feel of the gearbox ratio and allow you to ride a gear or two higher.

Edited by sabortooth

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KTM will drop these these little motors from their line up and rebadge Husabergs into Huskys. I will venture to say that my 2011 model WR made in Italy, will live longer than a 2015 KTM/Husaberg/Husqvarna creation.

I haven't read anything like that. I read that Husky will get their own design, unique from Anything in KTMs lineup (http://twostrokemotocross.com/forum/general-two-stroke-talk/ktm-reveals-some-plans-for-husqvarna/)

I bet in 2015-16 you'll see white/red KTMs with husky badges on it, but in the future Id expect husky to be different. That seems to be supported by the interviews I've read.

As far as reliability that you mentioned, I agree. It's going to be tough to match Husky reliability in these new models of huskys.

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Good write up.

The CR forks will need to be resprung and valved to work in the woods, but when completed you will be amazed of how smooth the the whole package becomes. I ride rocks and hills and could not imagine a better tool for the job. When you can, bump up to the 165 kit and Hold On. The power is explosive and the weight doesn't change. This will also clean up the feel of the gearbox ratio and allow you to ride a gear or two higher.

I plan on reshimming the stock stack and going from there. I think race tech is the next step after that. I like having the ability to DIY if I want a change. I hate spending nearly $1000 to ship my suspension out to do something I can do on my own for less than half the price with a little research and trial/error.

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this might be a stupid question but has anyone rode the WR (cross country) and the CR and compared/contrast? im in a debate on which model and would really be best, interested in opinions on how each one performs and differs???

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this might be a stupid question but has anyone rode the WR (cross country) and the CR and compared/contrast? im in a debate on which model and would really be best, interested in opinions on how each one performs and differs???

 

they are - and have been for years..-  mechanically identical,  

 same motor same gearbox, same frame,

 only real difference is the WR has a flywheel for lighting, and an 18" rear wheel along with softer ( sometimes lower spec) suspension,

 exhaust is more restricitive / quieter too,

 

 CR tends to discount more heavily as  husky brand has poor MX presence in recent years.,

 

Charlie

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this might be a stupid question but has anyone rode the WR (cross country) and the CR and compared/contrast? im in a debate on which model and would really be best, interested in opinions on how each one performs and differs???

 

I own the CR, and I can tell you that if you ride woods, you need to do some suspension work. MX probably isn't bad though I haven't tried it.

 

You might need some jetting changes too - the main seems a little lean to me. and the pilot I think is a bit rich. Either that, or the needle taper needs to change. I've heard of people putting RM needles in these carbs and getting good results.

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this might be a stupid question but has anyone rode the WR (cross country) and the CR and compared/contrast? im in a debate on which model and would really be best, interested in opinions on how each one performs and differs???

 

I own the CR, and I can tell you that if you ride woods, you need to do some suspension work. MX probably isn't bad though I haven't tried it.

 

You might need some jetting changes too - the main seems a little lean to me. and the pilot I think is a bit rich. Either that, or the needle taper needs to change. I've heard of people putting RM needles in these carbs and getting good results.

One advantage the WR has over CR.Aerial 003.JPG

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thanks for the replies! keep em coming! so an 18" wheel and flywheel are on the WR and sometimes lower spec suspension.... and sorry sabortooth if im wrong but the WR has a diff fender I guess and that's why you drilled it? or did it come like that?

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thanks for the replies! keep em coming! so an 18" wheel and flywheel are on the WR and sometimes lower spec suspension.... and sorry sabortooth if im wrong but the WR has a diff fender I guess and that's why you drilled it? or did it come like that?

 

i think that's the rear fender? He's saying an advantage of the WR is that you can get it plated for road use. Or am I missing something?

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OOO im spacey, tho I don't see why you couldn't on the cr im not worried about it the street legal part tho that would be nice, im leaning towards the WR

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OOO im spacey, tho I don't see why you couldn't on the cr im not worried about it the street legal part tho that would be nice, im leaning towards the WR

 

I kind of like the idea of a 18" rear wheel - I wish I had one to be honest. But I have no issues with the 19". Probably easier to change tires on the 19" anyway.

 

The CR can be made street legal - it's just more work, as the WR is already set up that way and includes all the parts you need.

 

Does the dealer have a 2013 WR available? See if you can find one that includes the 144 kit. Sometimes the cheap deals on these bikes don't include the 144.

Edited by JRod4928

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im looking at getting a 2012 wr125 or cr 125, there are some non current new models around

 

go for whichever can be had for less$$'s,

 as stated the WR has the option of a street tile most places , the CR is NOT designated as road legal,

 

some years have Sachs suspension,  some ohlins, etc

 

 the SACHS is actually pretty good,

 BUT not really an MX unit, fine for woods / offroad

 

the flywheel effect of the WR CAN be useful in tight terrain, you can always sell all the extra lights , stand etc if not needed,

 

Charlie

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I picked up a 2013 WR300 on clearence. I've only taken it out a few rides, but I'm super stoked. It's everything I was looking for & didn't know it. I hadn't been on a bike in 20 years. I bought my son an XR70 & all the gear, took him out a few times on my MTB & he seemed to take to it like a duck to water. I started shopping for a used 450 thumper in the $4k range. When I saw the ad on CL, I started to research it & couldn't find anything that was a deal breaker. I bought it from Tasky's in Everett, Jeff was super to deal with. The bike had a couple scratches from a demo day, no big deal.

 

I couldn't ride it, other than around the block a couple times, for almost two weeks because I had no gear. That gave me plenty of time to read up on it. I was expecting jetting issues, clutch slippage, & tough starting out in the woods. The only problem I've had was my own doing. I should have removed the kick stand before I broke it off my first ride. Starts first kick if I follow the sequence, bike runs great, & I rarely stall, even lugging around behind my son.

 

I last rode an XR250, great in the tight stuff, but not much else. I really liked the power of my buddies XR600, but it would soon wear me out in the tight stuff. I rode my buddy's RM250 with the full MX set up, & the power was to abrupt, tough to lug through tight stuff, impossible in wet clay or roots.

 

My Husky is a joy to ride, it's light, balanced, has plenty of managable power, tunable suspension, great grip, best brakes, easy maintainence, sounds & smells awesome.

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