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Wind down the damping for rough ground?

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I did some heavy duty terrain at the weekend, we all got shaken to bits, arm pump central lol

 

I was wondering what to do to increase comfort next time I ride this area.

 

It's hard rock base with stones and small boulders over it etc.

 

I had Maxxis IT's front and rear running 12.5psi rear 14psi front.

I don't want to run lower pressure as I fear pinch punctures and damaged rims.

 

Should I have just softened the damping?

 

It mainly felt like it was the forks that were harsh. I suppose I could have bleed the forks to see if there was pressure in there...

 

If I decided to soften the damping should I just do compression or move both by the same number of clicks?

 

It's all standard at the moment apart from the rear, I increased the rebound damping a couple of clicks as the back end was kicking up allot.

 

Cheers, Rich.

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Have you set the sag ?

 

+1

 

I rode mine with the stock suspension for a bit (w/proper springs & sag) and we have some rocky trails around here to... Dr.D can attest.  At first I thought the bike handled okay (didn't have much dirt experience to know any better).  However I was noticing that the front end felt somewhat soft as compared to the rear, but it generally did well in the rocky stuff.  It wasn't till the speeds increased that I began to feel like I was going to get thrown over the bars.  A combination of the rear-end kicking up and the front being soft (very soft when compared to almost any modern trail bike).

 

Following some guidance from the board and a few key members, I progressively began revalving my forks.  With each successive revalve I made them generally stiffer and most recently I did my shock (stiffer too).  The suspension feels much better now than it did before and its still plush on the rocky stuff (I haven't tested my shock revalve yet).

 

However each rider has different preferences... play with the clickers (after setting sag and do one adjustment at a time.  If you find you're running on the extreme end, either full IN or OUT then a revalve is in order.  If you have the resources ($$ or DIY) then just take my advice and revalve the suspension.

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Have you set the sag ?

Yep, I set the sag whenever I switch between touring (with panniers) and laning (E subframe back on).

 

I recently lowered the bike slightly on the suspension too. I raised the forks 20mm in the yokes, which lowered the whole front end by 10mm, so I then adjusted my race sag down by 10mm to re-level the bike while riding.

My current race sag is 104mm without full gear on (think of it as 94mm) - I've yet to check it when I've got full my kit & full drinks bladder on.

My static sag is something like 56mm - that should be less I know, I was told on here that my spring is too hard for me - I still don't really understand that but I'm not questioning it. :rolleyes:

 

Either way..., I think the bike is sitting level whilst I'm riding. I will check this next time I go out in full gear.

Also I have changed the fork oil, did it a few years ago.

Generally speaking the bike/suspension works fine for the terrain I normally ride but I think I might try softening up the forks and see what effect that has on things.

 

Cheers, Rich. :thumbsup:

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I did some heavy duty terrain at the weekend, we all got shaken to bits, arm pump central lol

 

I was wondering what to do to increase comfort next time I ride this area.

 

It's hard rock base with stones and small boulders over it etc.

 

I had Maxxis IT's front and rear running 12.5psi rear 14psi front.

I don't want to run lower pressure as I fear pinch punctures and damaged rims.

 

Should I have just softened the damping?

 

It mainly felt like it was the forks that were harsh. I suppose I could have bleed the forks to see if there was pressure in there...

 

If I decided to soften the damping should I just do compression or move both by the same number of clicks?

 

It's all standard at the moment apart from the rear, I increased the rebound damping a couple of clicks as the back end was kicking up allot.

 

Cheers, Rich.

Sounds like you spent the day in Connecticut. Sorry I dont have much to offer I would start with whats said above. Ive played with my adjusters and found the best quick resolve was a Scotts damper. I will be sending my suspension out at some point but only after I recoup from the hit on my wallet from damper and Rekluse cluch.

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