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Soon to be a former owner

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So there is a new members thread pinned, but what about us who won't be member anymore? :cry:

 

I will have one last ride this Sunday, and then I have to sell my bike. I bought it for around 4000$ over here with about 600km and some add ons like handle bar, hand guards and rear rack. Now, the my local dealer is offering me around 3000$, which I think is pretty fair, because you can find this bike, about same age same miles, for around 3200$ listed from other dealers, and he has to do all the paperwork and I assume also doesn't want to loose money. He can probably sell it for a tad more than 3200$ because I also added a skid plate and slip-on, but as we all know, when selling you don't really get much back for the add-ons you put on.

 

The interesting bit is, I think I'm going to miss my CRF a lot more than my CBR! The CBR was a lot of fun on the track, but the CRF was fun everywhere, anywhere, and took me to places that would have been impossible to go to with my CBR. Even sitting in a traffic jam is less exhausting on a CRF than on a CBR, trust me! :rolleyes:

 

My biggest regret is that I didn't buy the CRF, or any 250 Dual Sport for that matter, a lot earlier!

 

I might be back next year though, because I think I'll buy another 250 once I am in the US, and if I find a good deal, it could be another CRF :ride:

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You do not have to own a CRF250L to be welcomed around here ....    :cheers:

 

just cuz you sold your CRF don't mean you have to sell us out as well ....  :p  ...  :lol:

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Whats the reason for the sell? :mellow:

 

Moving continents, not worth it to bring it with me. Also, I already have a bike where I move to next, it's waiting for me. And then I am moving continents again in six months. Moving the CRF twice is really not worth the money.

 

 

You do not have to own a CRF250L to be welcomed around here ....    :cheers:

 

just cuz you sold your CRF don't mean you have to sell us out as well ....  :p  ...  :lol:

 

You mean, I won't get banned after I sold my CRF? :bonk:

 

Enjoy you trip :thumbsup:  is it permanent?? :ride: Bikes come and go :cry:

 

As long as I keep doing my job and stay in my company, I doubt anything will be permanent. Three weeks after I started, I was sent to the US for three months. Well, it was only meant to be two weeks, but they were quite happy with my performance, so they asked to have me for another two weeks...and another...and another..., so it worked out to be three months in the end. Came back for about a month, then was asked if I could go to the US again for three months, which I did. My neighbours in Germany were pleased because "I was so quiet all the time" :D After a while I moved to a different factory in Germany, another year later off to Japan, now moving back to Germany for six months, then next year to the US for a couple of years. Last two guys who were sent to the US decided to stay and got green cards, though I have some qualifications that no one else in our division has, so who knows, I might be asked to go to just another country. They already asked me to go to China, which I had expected, but I declined. Don't want to go there.

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My posting activities in the Yamaha  4 stroke and 2 stroke forums ceased almost immediately after I sold my YZ250 and 450F  and replaced them with a pair of CRF450x's  -----

 

--you likely wont be around long either except maybe in GD , once the bike leaves your hands -- but again, that's a personal decision.   I know I have better things to do than read and conversate about bikes I don't own anymore

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I'm also selling my CRFL and already regret doing it.


I have a few buyers lined up, but everybody is strapped for cash around here. 


 


For the past month the bike has been sitting in the garage all polished and with around 1000€ in accessories. 


I'm probably going to regret it because it's a great all-round bike. 


I got into my head that I want/need a tougher and stronger enduro bike.


 


 


Lemon,


What work do you do?


I wouldn't mind that kind of engagement at this point in life. 

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It doesn't matter where they send you, you are welcome here.  :thumbsup:

Thanks!  :cheers:

 

Lemon,

What work do you do?

I wouldn't mind that kind of engagement at this point in life. 

 

I`m a process engineer by education, mix of mechanical and chemical engineer, and sort of do-it-all at my company. Started with lean manufacturing and management and then moved to one of our factories. Worked in different departments, because one of my main tasks is to support international exchange, which means I have to know about everything, but also need to have a feeling for the cultural differences. People from different cultures see the world through different eyes, and even using the same word, one might mean something else than the other. Logic can be totally different too, depending on where you are.

 

I work for a parts supplier and we have factories all over the world. Our customers want the same quality, same processes same standards where ever we produce. Which is harder to achieve than it might sound like. Oh and it is very likely that everyone of you is using parts of my company in either your bike or car, or both  :D

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Interesting.  i hope they pay you well, i hope they appreciate.
Give us a clue so we can guess what it is.

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You should make the company pay to ship the bike all over.

Say its transportation expenses.

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Sadly, company won't pay for vehicle transportation. Do they pay me well? Hard to tell. Of course I think it should be more, but I doubt there will ever be a time where I'll say "yeah, that's enough, don't need a pay raise" :D

 

I don't think my company is paying great salaries, but I do think they are paying reasonable salaries. It's a family owned business, more than 100 years old, and they actually like to employ the "down to earth" type of people. It's a nice atmosphere.

 

I do think though they should pay a bit more to expatriates. Compared to some other suppliers, let alone the car manufacturers, I think they are being a bit cheap. If I hadn't had other, personal reasons to go to Japan, I would not have gone. I did get a bonus, but that alone wouldn't be enough. And forget about the "but it's a lifetime opportunity, a great experience" stuff. The interesting thing is, they can't find a replacement for me, even though they are looking for over a year already. But as they need me more in the US than in Japan, I'm leaving Japan now and head to the US next year.

 

At least that's the plan.

 

By the way, the bike I have waiting in Germany is not being sold in the US, so even if they would pay transportation, it would be near impossible to get it registered I heard. From what I heard and read, the US is very restrictive when it comes to that. The CRF might be easier though, but I'd have to ship it twice, and that would make it more expensive than just selling and getting a new one.

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There's really no need to ship the bike from that far away when there are plenty of CRFLs and any other bikes where you're heading. 

 

Which bike do you have in Germany?

I know US military personal can buy vehicles in Germany without taxes (about 20% discount) and bring it back to the US on the company dime.

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Yeah you can save the 19% tax, bus still, the vehicle must comply to all the safety and emission standards. And if the manufacturer won't certify that, you have to pay for all the testing, and if it does fail the certification process, you have spent a lot of money and a vehicle that you have to export again.

 

For example, it has to fulfil the EPA standards. It either needs a sticker on the engine or a letter from the manufacturer that the engine does fulfil the standards. If not, have to pay for the testing, which is according to a few pages I found about 5000$. And that's just EPA emissions.

 

 

In order to import vehicles manufactured for sale outside the United States, you must satisfy the requirements of no less than three government agencies: US Customs, the Department of Transportation (DOT), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

 

I guess I will call the manufacturer if the bike fulfil the standards, but if it would, why wouldn't they sell it in the states to begin with? I heard the strict requirements and testing that needs to be done is a reason why the US doesn't get a lot of the motorcycles that the rest of the world gets.

 

Oh and my bike is a CBF600S, nothing special, but I like it. Easy to ride, comfy and decent fuel economy.

img2360e.jpg

 

Adjustable seat and shield are standard on this bike. And looking back, I wish I would have paid the money to bring it to Japan.

 

 

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:cry:

So I dropped the bike off at my dealer earlier. A bit sad, the bike really grew on me, and I had a lot of fun this morning again. I also had the chance to ride on a KTM 250 Six Days today. Well, even though I only rode it just for a little bit, the suspension immediately felt a lot nicer. A lot smoother, less harsh...hard to tell. I'm no expert in suspensions and the CRF was my first Enduro, so what can I say. :rolleyes:

 

The KTM also felt lighter, the clutch felt lighter, which was nice, but the throttle felt somewhat jerky. I didn't like that, but maybe that's something to get used to. Or maybe because I'm a beginner and it's actually a good thing for me that the CRF doesn't have a lot of power.

 

He also rode my CRF, and he said that the bike feels very friendly, with a good and gentle heart. Not sure if that's just a nice way of saying it's weak, but that's what he said :D

 

Now I have to get back and pack my stuff for the move tomorrow :thumbsdn:

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Good luck with your travels and don't be a stranger "round here"   :thumbsup:

 

It might be a good idea to check in when you get there just so we know you made it okay and don't worry about ya !!! ...............  :lol:

 

 

cheers mate ...     :cheers:

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Alright, I finally got internet! Took over a month, ridiculous.

 

I miss my CRF, though there aren't any trails to ride over here, and it's cold. Back on my CBF, but as I said it's cold, and these days it is very foggy in the mountains (below 50m visibility at some point today), so I'm not out that often. Though I try to ride whenever it's dry to not get out of training, so to say.

 

Some pictures from today.

 

IMG_5945.jpg?revision=1125&size=256  IMG_5954.jpg?revision=1121&size=256

 

IMG_5963.jpg?revision=1123&size=256   IMG_5965.jpg?revision=1124&size=256

 

Good thing though, I can legally ride faster than 60kph over here :ride:

 

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awesome pictures ...  :thumbsup:  and beautiful country too. 

Thanks for stopping by and updating us with such great pic's. It sounds like your doing well and keep up with the posts ...  :cheers:

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