2000 XR250R - updating/adjusting/tuning the suspension

I'm wanting to adjust/tune the suspension on my 2000 XR250R a bit as at the moment I'm finding it a tad soft (particularly in the front) and after 13 years it can probably do with it.

 

According to RaceTech < http://racetech.com/ > the standard suspension specifications are:

 

Front:

 

KYB 41C   41mm conventional

Stock Fork Spring Rate  0.398 kg/mm (stock)  

Recommended Preload  4mm

 

Rear:

 

KYB   44 mm 

Stock Shock Spring Rate 11.3 kg/mm  

http://racetech.com/ProductSearch/1/Honda/XR250R/2000 >

 

 

Using their calculator the recommended setup for me would be:

 

Recommended Fork Spring Rate: 0.454 - 0.466 kg/mm

Recommended Shock Spring Rate: 11.476 - 11.592 kg/mm

 

 

I'm thinking therefore a 11.5kg/mm rear spring would be best. Either:

Racetech SESP 886115 SK SPRING 55.5 x 190 11.5kg, or:

Eibach Shock Spring EI886.0115.1 - 11.5kg Rate < http://www.xrsonly.com/eibach-shock-spring-honda-xr250r-96-up-11-5kg-rate >

 

 

But I don't seem to be able to find any replacement front springs to suit? Racetech state that they are FESP 990   Spring Series, but I cannot find any listings of this type? Any recommendations on where to look for a supplier of front springs to suit?

 

When doing the front forks, is there anything else to consider such as fitting Racetech FMGV 2040  Type 1 Gold Valve Kit (Standard Type 1 Compression Kit) < http://racetech.com/ItemInfo/1 >?

 

What about tuning the rear setup? It looks as though the shock absorber has a setting on it (marked: H <-> S)? What is the effect of this adjustment?

 

IMG_2433_zps4cdb00fe.jpg

IMG_2435_zps371f26b9.jpg

 

 

And the top of the rear spring is adjustable? Is this to alter the height of the back of the bike or is it to adjust preload on the rear spring?

 

IMG_2439_zps74b2883b.jpg

IMG_2437_zps39542cef.jpg

You adjust the large nuts above the spring to preload the spring when setting rear sag. Setting sag for your weight is the first thing you need to do. Do a search here for an explanation on how to do that if you don't know. You're looking for a rider sag of between 3.5"-4", depending on how plush you want it and the type terrain you ride. After getting that set, measure how much free sag you have( how much the rear end sags under just the bikes own weight). You want around an inch.

Personally, I would take that shock off and clean those preload adjuster threads before doing anything.

The adjuster on the shock reservoir is the compression clicker. Turning it towards the H makes shock compression stiffer, towards the S makes it softer. There should also be a similar adjuster on the clevis end of the shock which is the rebound adjuster. H on it means slower rebound, S means quicker rebound.

If I recall, the 250 has compression adjusters on the forks but not rebound. They will be at the bottom of the forks, usually under a rubber plug that you pry out, if they haven't been removed and discarded already.

Edited by Trailryder42

Difference from 11.3 to 11.5 would not be noticable to any degree at all.  I'm really surprised the stocker is that stiff, that's the recommendation for a 225-ish lb rider, and no way does that seem possible given how soft XR's are sprung.  ???
 

Difference from 11.3 to 11.5 would not be noticable to any degree at all.  I'm really surprised the stocker is that stiff, that's the recommendation for a 225-ish lb rider, and no way does that seem possible given how soft XR's are sprung.  ???

 

Not, sure, that's just the specifications provided on the  RaceTech < http://racetech.com/  website.

For the front springs, copy and paste this into the search bar

Aftermarket Springs for 2002 XR250R

Make sure you search within the 250/400 forum.  These are the springs I just got about 3 weeks ago for my bike.  They were the stiffest that I could find that fit the 250R and fairly cheap ($125) .  I don't know if they even make any aftermarket springs from Racetech specifically for the 250.  I have heard that WER and LT Racing does some work on XR's suspension so if you'd be willing to spend the money they would be a good one to get in contact with. 

The only place I was able to find/get stiffer front springs for my 04 XR250 was from http://www.cannonracecraft.com.  If I remember correctly, they ran me about $180 two years ago. 

Edited by xrsingletrack

For the front springs, copy and paste this into the search bar

Aftermarket Springs for 2002 XR250R

Make sure you search within the 250/400 forum.  These are the springs I just got about 3 weeks ago for my bike.  They were the stiffest that I could find that fit the 250R and fairly cheap ($125) .  I don't know if they even make any aftermarket springs from Racetech specifically for the 250.  I have heard that WER and LT Racing does some work on XR's suspension so if you'd be willing to spend the money they would be a good one to get in contact with. 

 

Found it, < http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/1050126-aftermarket-springs-for-2002-xr250r/ >, thanks.

You adjust the large nuts above the spring to preload the spring when setting rear sag. Setting sag for your weight is the first thing you need to do. Do a search here for an explanation on how to do that if you don't know. You're looking for a rider sag of between 3.5"-4", depending on how plush you want it and the type terrain you ride. After getting that set, measure how much free sag you have( how much the rear end sags under just the bikes own weight). You want around an inch.

 

I just measured and the bike has almost 100mm of race sag and 35mm of free sag. So not too bad setup as is.

Nobody in the aftermarket is making XR250 fork springs anymore. I ended up getting a custom set wound for me last year. Cost a fair bit more than what they normally, but I got what I wanted.

I know we did Eibach springs in the front on my 250 but that was 12 or 13 years ago. If you install stiffer springs you will need to revalve as your forks have no rebound adjustment. With out a revalve it will come back way to quick and handle like crap.

A rebuild and correctly adjusting your rear shock will make a huge difference.

I'm finally going to actually sort this out as I have been finding the bottom of the front suspensions travel lately.


 


Can anyone confirm the parts required for the rebuild of the front forks:


 


2L oil - 5w - any particular brands recommended?


New fork springs - looking at the Cannon RaceCraft Inc CN34444 < http://www.xrsonly.com/cannon-fork-spring-honda-xr250r-36kg-through-52kg > in 46kg


2 x fork seals - K&L Supply < http://www.xrsonly.com/k-l-supply-fork-seals-honda-xr250r-86-up > or Race Tech  FKOS 41 P   < http://racetech.com/ProductSearch/1/Honda/XR250R/2000 >


 


Anything else required such as: Pair of inner/outter fork bushings? Pair of dust seals? Pair of dampening rod bolt copper washer?


Anyone wants the easier route I've got an extra pair of 400 legs off my 03 in EX condition. bikes had very little use. I got another set of forks with a motard setup I bought and those forks had already been resprung and revalved so I put them on my 400 and these have been sitting 4 years now. No gouges or scratches, really clean. PM if interested. ($150)

So had my first ride with the new suspension on the weekend - wow what a difference! The front is no longer bottoming out which is a great start, but it is so so so smooth, just takes the knocks.

A mate of mine who until recently rode an XR400 of similar year and now just bought a Yamaha YZF450 which is only a few years old was super impressed with how it performed to when he took it for a test ride.

Did you clean that poor thing? Grease ALL the pivot bearings including the swingarm?  That makes a big difference in suspension action. I have a feeling that bike needs some grease.

Edited by YHGEORGE

Did you have them re-valved as well? I'm about to pick up a 250R in a trade and going to try it in some hare scrambles till I can afford a 450X or something.

One thing that is often neglected is the nitrogen in the rear shock.  Even if you aren't rebuilding it (which at that age you should), and it isn't leaking, your nitrogen is still most likely low.  I had mine checked a couple months ago, it was around 110, should be 140 I believe.  I'm going to dissasemble it this winter, but just adding the proper amount of nitrogen made a world of difference in the function of the rear shock.  And its a cheap thing to do, a local shop topped mine off for $15.  And it doesn't need to be removed to do it.

Edited by cjjeepercreeper

Did you have them re-valved as well? I'm about to pick up a 250R in a trade and going to try it in some hare scrambles till I can afford a 450X or something.

 

The XR250R front forks, like mentioned above, don't have rebound damping, just compression.  You may want to get used to the behavior of the front end before you try to compete on it, you will find a fair amount of deflection, and if you aren't used to it it can be disconcerting, or even disastrous.  I've been riding my 03 for years so I've learned to compensate for the deflection in the stock fork setup, but there is a learning curve.

Thanks, I will take it out and wring it out first. I really don't have much to compare it too, but the stock XR650L front suspension was disconcerting until I did the CRF conversion. I can do one on the 250R if needed but I thought maybe I can just get them re-sprung and re-valved?

I rode about 40 miles of woods this time and boy did I have fun! The stock suspension is not all that bad for my weight and riding style. I'm thinking I will just get the stockers re-valved professionally and run with it. The little XRR is pretty amazing in the woods.

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