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Taking your wheel to a shop to get the tire changed

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How do you guys prepare the wheel to do this?

 

So far I have removed the axle and the spacers on both sides.

 

Do you guys remove the rotor and sprocket as well? Not sure if they are in danger of being damaged while the tire is changed.

 

 

Thanks!

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How do you guys prepare the wheel to do this?

 

So far I have removed the axle and the spacers on both sides.

 

Do you guys remove the rotor and sprocket as well? Not sure if they are in danger of being damaged while the tire is changed.

 

 

Thanks!

nope. the shop should be able to work around them...

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do not take them off they need them on in order to balance the wheel

Should they balance the wheel for free if I pay 25 bucks to have the tire changed?

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Should they balance the wheel for free if I pay 25 bucks to have the tire changed?

me local shop charges 25 to change a tire if the wheels are still ON the bike,  if you take just the wheel its 10 bucks,   so yeah,  they should balance it for that much.

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If they want $25 to change a tire I would do this instead...

Buy yourself one of these tire irons: http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/43/-/171/726/-/20307/Tusk-17%22-Mega-Tire-Iron?term=tire%20irons

Buy two of these tire irons: http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/43/-/171/726/-/17141/Motion-Pro-Spoon-Type-Tire-Iron?term=tire%20irons

Buy this bead buddy: http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/44/-/256/1511/-/3044/Tusk-Motorcycle-Tire-Bead-Tool?term=bead%20buddy

And watch this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qw0B2gIwbBg

I followed this guys method and it went sooooo much smoother than any other tire change I've done before.

 

Like with just about anything, the first time you try it the process is slow.  Change one set though, and it goes remarkably faster after that.  I'd rank the difficulty level of changing a tire as moderate.  For me, it's not worth it to pay the shop and the cost of gas to get there and back.  One trip to the shop with their expenses would pay for the tools I listed above.  I also make extra money on the side changing tires for my friends.

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If they want $25 to change a tire I would do this instead...

Buy yourself one of these tire irons: http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/43/-/171/726/-/20307/Tusk-17%22-Mega-Tire-Iron?term=tire%20irons

Buy two of these tire irons: http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/43/-/171/726/-/17141/Motion-Pro-Spoon-Type-Tire-Iron?term=tire%20irons

Buy this bead buddy: http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/44/-/256/1511/-/3044/Tusk-Motorcycle-Tire-Bead-Tool?term=bead%20buddy

And watch this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qw0B2gIwbBg

I followed this guys method and it went sooooo much smoother than any other tire change I've done before.

 

Like with just about anything, the first time you try it the process is slow.  Change one set though, and it goes remarkably faster after that.  I'd rank the difficulty level of changing a tire as moderate.  For me, it's not worth it to pay the shop and the cost of gas to get there and back.  One trip to the shop with their expenses would pay for the tools I listed above.  I also make extra money on the side changing tires for my friends.

how hard are 17s? I just worry about pinching a tube...

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how hard are 17s? I just worry about pinching a tube...

I change the stock 18" and 21" on my S the most, but they're all about the same. I use heavy duty tubes and I hardly put any air in them when changing tires. I am very careful to make sure the tube is all the way in the tire and that it's not twisted. The best advice I can give you is to make sure the bead is properly seated when you first start installing the tire. If it isn't, you're NOT going to get the tire on. If it's off, you'd be surprised how impossible it is to stretch a tire that last 1/2" over the wheel. Also, always leave at least one spoon in so that it's easier to get the next spoon in as you work your way around the tire. Go nice and slow, taking small bites, and you'd be surprised how much easier it is than everyone says...

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Whooo. Where do you get a tire changed for $10.00.  Really not happening.  Even I don't work that cheap.  If you can get a tire changed for $25 as a carry in that is a pretty sweet deal and no it may not include balance.  Price usually depends on if the tire was purchased at the shop doing the instal.

 

17's are easy to change by hand.  A lot easier than stiff off-road 18 and 21's.  With the right tools, some practice and patience pinching a tube is easy to avoid.  Just a matter of practice and experience.  balancing at home is easy too.  All you need is 2 jack stands and the axle.  Parts stores sell weights.

 

Brake discs and sprockets stay on.  Up to the shop (or you) to be careful of them.  But they are not needed for balance.  Too small and too light.

 

My opinion is everybody should know how to change a tire even it they choose to have a shop do it.

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Whooo. Where do you get a tire changed for $10.00.  Really not happening.  Even I don't work that cheap.  If you can get a tire changed for $25 as a carry in that is a pretty sweet deal and no it may not include balance.  Price usually depends on if the tire was purchased at the shop doing the instal.

 

17's are easy to change by hand.  A lot easier than stiff off-road 18 and 21's.  With the right tools, some practice and patience pinching a tube is easy to avoid.  Just a matter of practice and experience.  balancing at home is easy too.  All you need is 2 jack stands and the axle.  Parts stores sell weights.

 

Brake discs and sprockets stay on.  Up to the shop (or you) to be careful of them.  But they are not needed for balance.  Too small and too light.

 

My opinion is everybody should know how to change a tire even it they choose to have a shop do it.

Hi Noble, if I bring my tire and rim in, purchase a new tire, they will mount for $10. If I bring in my bike, they charge $20.

 

So there's no confusion,....this is Per Tire.

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Wow, you guys have it CHEAP!

Locally (in a city of a million people), I found one shop that would swap a tire for $35 each.

The rest of the shops in town wanted anywhere from $75 to $125 PER WHEEL, loose wheels at that.

If they were on the bike, it would be a minimum of 2.5 hours at $95-$110/hour!

Hah!

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Wow, you guys have it CHEAP!

Locally (in a city of a million people), I found one shop that would swap a tire for $35 each.

The rest of the shops in town wanted anywhere from $75 to $125 PER WHEEL, loose wheels at that.

If they were on the bike, it would be a minimum of 2.5 hours at $95-$110/hour!

Hah!

 

i think you know what you need to do as a side job :)

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A local shop swaps tubes / tires on a wheel you bring in for about $15 per. They do a fine job too. Balancing is included.

thats not bad

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I love 'em! They're very gruff, and you have to double-check the quality to be sure, but if something is less than 100% they fix it immediately and without complaint. Certainly fine by me.

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The local shop charges $30 a tire mounted and balanced. Tubeless tires. I have access to a touch less machine but it's only available 9-5 weekdays plus how far away it is.

I used to do all mine at home but space and time are a premium.

I only do knobbies myself now.

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It definitely pays to know how to change tires yourself as Noble says.Especially if you live in rural areas.Even in my locale reasonable and customary charges for changing motorcycle tires is $60-80 for carry-ins.For a little more I have a Harbor Freight manual changer, a tire spreader,balancing stand,4 spoons, 3 bead buddies and stick-on wheel weights to quickly handle any tire task as I usually go through 3 tires per season of riding so it's worth it for me.The old Shopinsky videos give you a good foundation for dirt bike tires.SM tires have a much stiffer side wall and bead breaking takes much more force but otherwise the techniques are very similar.

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The closest shop to me that changes motorcycle tires happens to be a Kawasaki dealership. They wanted something like $35 a wheel if I brought them in. $45 if I drove the bike in and and it was a week wait till they could do it! Other shops in town wanted about the same rates unless I bought the tires from them at a inflated rate of $20-$30 cheaper than online, then they'd install for a little less.

 

I ordered a couple of the 11" motion pro tire irons along with the rim shields and did it myself. The shields were useless and always in the way by taking up space for the tire to maneuver on. I ended up not using them but I did scratch my wheels a little. I was pissed at first but you can't see the scratches unless you bend down and look at the rims. I popped 2 tubes learning. Some video I watched on youtube recommended putting air in the tube then installing the tire. Both attempts at this popped 2 tubes in a row. I then tried it with no air in the tire and got 2 tires on with no problem with no pops. Did my uncle's DR 650 with the same michelin t63s the next day with no pinches.

 

It's doable and once you realize what you're doing wrong you'll probably never do it again. I had to go to the Kawasaki dealership to purchase the replacement tubes and the parts guy said his mechanic pops them all the time. He also said they've scratched wheels up too, especially the colored or black anodized wheels on the new Kawasakis. After I heard all this I didn't feel so bad, but I know there are people who can install them and not pop and scratch wheels!

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