Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

body positioning in air

Recommended Posts

Finding through video and photos of myself as well as a note from a friend  that my body positioning in the air is AWFUL. I am so far forward , almost as far as I am when I am cornering sometimes.  Part of me thinks this is because I am shorter (5'7)  but theres gotta be a way to force me farther backwards. I am good about it in straight aways and sand sections getting off the rear fender, but in the air its a trainwreck.   Could it be as simple as foot placement on the pegs?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finding through video and photos of myself as well as a note from a friend  that my body positioning in the air is AWFUL. I am so far forward , almost as far as I am when I am cornering sometimes.  Part of me thinks this is because I am shorter (5'7)  but theres gotta be a way to force me farther backwards. I am good about it in straight aways and sand sections getting off the rear fender, but in the air its a trainwreck.   Could it be as simple as foot placement on the pegs?

 can you post up said pictures? what you do in the air is a result of what you do on the jump face. If your too far back going up the face, or accelerating to hard with improper body position, your going to have to get forward when air borne. Rider input to create a desired suspension rebound from the face can have a large impact.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks like neutral body position to me, nothing wrong with that.  A lot of guys don't realize where neutral, even balanced position is on a bike.  They lean too far back and as a consequence also suffer from arm pump.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That doesnt look too far forward to me.

 

However, you are standing very upright. Try bending more at the hips, your head will be just over the bars and your butt will be further back, while keeping your back straight with elbows out (typical attack position).  Just focus on keeping your head above the handlebars and bending at the hips and I bet you'll see a difference in the pics taken.

 

I had terrrrrible posture in the air when I first started, stood very upright like you and my elbows would go inwards (this is terrible for trying to give the bike any body english if you get crossed up). The attack position allowed you to shift your weight and move that bike around easier.

 

 

This was me when I first started:

facebook_1920296124_zpse7eee31e.jpg

 

And now after a few years:

facebook_-1776082009_zpsfdc97802.jpg

Edited by Eric_mx
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so.... i've been wanting to make a thread on here discussing style for a while.

 

You look comfortable and efficient on the bike. Obviously minimal rider input in the air is going to use the least amount of energy.

 

If you look at the ranges of ways in which you can hit a jump, there are pretty large ranges of speed, throttle and body position (all dependent on each other) in which you can hit the same jump. Jumping so that you are neutral in the air makes up a small portion, fairly central within the speed/throttle/BP ranges. It's the pretty natural progression of jumping, as your learning, jumping neutrally is the first thing you perfect, from there you start learning to jump more technically.

 

Again, it's all about what your doing on the face of the jump and prior. If your coming into a jump fast and have to let off on the face, your going to use body position the air keep the bike from endoing. If your hitting a difficult jump right out of a corner and have the bike pinned, it's going to take BP to prevent you from looping out. Change the jump faces, throw in some bumps on the lip, make it a hip jump, and you really see the fluidity which jumping requires with balancing multiple things at the same time.

 

As you get more comfortable, even your neutral jumping will probably change to something a bit more stylish.

Edited by Die_trying
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well I feel a bit better reading this. Thanks for the help guys,  going to try and pin some of this stuff in the back of my head for the next ride day...I should point out that I have been racing for some time but htis year is my first year back after a pretty nasty crash that kept me away from the sport for a few years. It just so happens the crash came on a jump, so the first time I jumped again I had the frog in my stomach the entire time.  I'm over that fear of getting hurt while jumping but I have noticed I am far more cautious now and I was concerned that my body positioning was a reflection of that caution

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Style comes from making mistakes.  Huh?  This is very much in line with what DT is saying....

 

It was explained to my very well once in an area that had nothing to do with jumping a bike.  I was getting wakeboarding lessons from Kyle Schmidt, the instructional editor for wakeboarding magazine.  Kyle explained that beginners try to get the perfect take off...with the assumption that once you leave the wake (jump) perfectly...the rest will be easy.  That is dead wrong.  The key is understanding that NO take off is perfect.  They are always a little screwed up.  What is important is learning to compensate for the inevitable imperfection with body movements and manipulation as you leave the face and you are in the air (within limits of course...you can not completely bone your take off).  What we call style is really the way that various riders compensate for imperfections in take off.  The only way to learn this...is to make a lot of mistakes...and the way you do that...is by doing a lot of jumps....

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×