Second wheelset, not from DRZ

Well, I finally got my second wheel set finished up. 

 

I bought a 2007 KTM 300 EXC rear wheel and a 2004 Suzuki RMZ front wheel (Excel).  The brake rotors are the correct size from both of these bikes, the RMZ is a fair bit thinner but it's a floating rotor.  The KTM spacers work for the rear, I had to figure out custom spacers for the front.  I bought (2) of the inner wheel spacers from the front hub assembly and my dad shortened them up on the lathe at work.  

 

I then took both wheels apart and blasted them to prep for powdercoat.  The rear wheel had a crack in it so I bought a new black Moose rim to replace it.  The spokes on both wheels had some rust, so I bought new stainless spoke sets for both wheels. 

 

While they were apart, my dad and I built a wheel truing stand. 

 

I laced and trued both wheels myself, it wasn't nearly as hard as I expected.  I watched a couple YouTube videos and set off about it.  I tightened the spokes according the the recommended sequence and then just snugged them up equally tight.  I used an inch pound torque wrench, an Allen socket, and a spoke wrench to get a feel for the proper amount of torque.  I don't have a spoke torque wrench.  I also had to add some offset to the rear wheel.  I used a makeshift plumb bob hanging from the subframe to center the wheel.

 

I bought button head cap screws for the rear rotor for clearance reasons.  With the factory bolts there was contact with the caliper bracket.

 

When my dad saw them come back from powder coat, he decided they looked to nice to put my old death wings on and bought me as set of Avon Distanzias.  They look really nice, I haven't had a chance to ride it yet though.  I got them mounted up at a local motorcycle shop so I didn't have to worry about scratching my fresh powder coat. 

 

I'm really pleased with how they came out.  :ride:

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looks great!

 

what size are the tires?

looks great!

 

what size are the tires?

Thanks,

 

120 80 18 and 90 90 21. 

 

I have to renew my permit before I can take my motorcycle license test, so hopefully I'll get to ride her soon.  Then I'll let everyone know what I think about the tires.

Great work

Very good.  If you want to go a step further you can put 6204 bearings in the KTM hub for more durability and make/modify wheel spacers and center spacer to fit.

Nice Job, looks great...   

 

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Edited by Radtech

Well, I finally got my second wheel set finished up. 

 

I bought a 2007 KTM 300 EXC rear wheel and a 2004 Suzuki RMZ front wheel (Excel).  The brake rotors are the correct size from both of these bikes, the RMZ is a fair bit thinner but it's a floating rotor.  The KTM spacers work for the rear, I had to figure out custom spacers for the front.  I bought (2) of the inner wheel spacers from the front hub assembly and my dad shortened them up on the lathe at work.  

 

I then took both wheels apart and blasted them to prep for powdercoat.  The rear wheel had a crack in it so I bought a new black Moose rim to replace it.  The spokes on both wheels had some rust, so I bought new stainless spoke sets for both wheels. 

 

While they were apart, my dad and I built a wheel truing stand. 

 

I laced and trued both wheels myself, it wasn't nearly as hard as I expected.  I watched a couple YouTube videos and set off about it.  I tightened the spokes according the the recommended sequence and then just snugged them up equally tight.  I used an inch pound torque wrench, an Allen socket, and a spoke wrench to get a feel for the proper amount of torque.  I don't have a spoke torque wrench.  I also had to add some offset to the rear wheel.  I used a makeshift plumb bob hanging from the subframe to center the wheel.

 

I bought button head cap screws for the rear rotor for clearance reasons.  With the factory bolts there was contact with the caliper bracket.

 

When my dad saw them come back from powder coat, he decided they looked to nice to put my old death wings on and bought me as set of Avon Distanzias.  They look really nice, I haven't had a chance to ride it yet though.  I got them mounted up at a local motorcycle shop so I didn't have to worry about scratching my fresh powder coat. 

 

I'm really pleased with how they came out.  :ride:

 

 

good on both you and dad for a really well executed project. i've grown very tired of the "i bought a 'billet' widget for my bike, someone tell me how to install it ! now !" mentality. you two have done a very nice job, thoroughly, and on your own. commendable !

 

if you want to spread the knowledge about the little tricks you learned while truing the wheel/wheels, by all means do so. there are -VERY- few people with the balls to attempt, let alone complete a safe wheel lacing. 

 

don't forget to give your riding impressions of the distanzias, wheelsets, and if you ever decide to go tubeless, write that up too, ok ? 

 

also - dad, you done good sir ~ 

Gorgeous bike, nice job!

Very good.  If you want to go a step further you can put 6204 bearings in the KTM hub for more durability and make/modify wheel spacers and center spacer to fit.

 

I figure if the original bearings lasted through the torture that the PO put on them, my new replacements should be fine for street duty.  Good to know the options are out there though, thanks.

 

good on both you and dad for a really well executed project. i've grown very tired of the "i bought a 'billet' widget for my bike, someone tell me how to install it ! now !" mentality. you two have done a very nice job, thoroughly, and on your own. commendable !

 

if you want to spread the knowledge about the little tricks you learned while truing the wheel/wheels, by all means do so. there are -VERY- few people with the balls to attempt, let alone complete a safe wheel lacing. 

 

don't forget to give your riding impressions of the distanzias, wheelsets, and if you ever decide to go tubeless, write that up too, ok ? 

 

also - dad, you done good sir ~ 

 

I know what you mean, people will buy stuff with directions and still expect someone else to all but do it for them.  I really started this project as an "I'm to broke to buy a set of Warp 9's" thing.  It kinda snowballed a bit, but I'm pretty pleased with the outcome.  Dad also bought the back rotor, took one look at the old one and was like "you can't run that."  I figured it would work for a while, until I could buy another.  He really helped out a bunch.

 

I pretty much watched this video and followed their methods. 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16dwL08Wn2w

 

Once you get started, it's pretty obvious which spokes go to which locations in the rim.   Make sure you lube the spoke nipples or they don't torque very well.  I got a little ambitious on the rear and forgot, had to try and spray some lube on them after they were assembled.

 

Thanks everyone, hopefully some other people will pick up some KTM/RM wheels for their bikes.  I found all of the information as to which wheels fit our bikes on this forum, so anyone looking to do the same should also be able to.  Then head over to ebay and start bidding.

 

If I had it to do over again, I would have carefully masked off the areas I didn't want blasted by the powder coat guy, as well as the placed I didn't want powder coat.  I had to carefully file a lot of powder off of the rotor and sprocket mounting locations.  He was pretty good about not getting any in the threads though.

Ask any KTM owner about rear wheel bearings. They are light duty for the application.  Yes they will be OK for the street but if they get loose at all, replace right away.

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