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entry speed

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Trying to teach my son how entry speed dictates exit speed but I cant quite get him to do it.  I believe he understands but cant quite get it.  Any recommendations are appreciated,

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I'm not sure how old or how advanced your son is, but here is something that my father did with me years ago that helped a lot. Part of learning entry speed is to first learn to charge at the corner and brake late. My father would find a corner that I was coasting into, and that was also safe if I went straight through it (should I not be able to slow down enough). He would look at where I was letting off the throttle and coasting, then stand a few feet closer to the corner. He would tell me not to let off the throttle until I am even with him. Then once I did that a few times he would move a step closer to the corner without me knowing. I would do that a few times and he would move another step closer to the corner.

 

This forced me to charge at the corner, and once I was used to that and realized I could still make the corner without a problem, I would start to increase my entry speed, which directly increased my overall cornering speed.

 

I don't know if it will work for your son, but it helped me.

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Find a corner which you can go over the berm without a problem. Then put a cone on the side of the track and use it as a breaking marker. Start with lots of room and then slowly move the cone further and further into the corner, until he feels comfortable hitting it harder.

Exit speed will come with entry speed, you know that. :)

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I should have been a little more specific. He is 16 and a C rider. Just got back into racing after a 7 year break. I have been using the exact methods you both described. I guess more seat time is the key. He is progressing well but is not happy with his rate of progress. With further thought about the situation, I guess the heart of the problem is being too late on exceleration. Hes not getting back in the gas until beyond the apex. This would not be bad if his entry speed was great but its not quite there yet. Thanks

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Well, 7 year break... that means the last time he raced he was 9 years old? I mean everything has changed for him, so its most likely just going to take a while. But yea, the cone method usually works well to resolve issues like this. I also like to stand on the inside of the corner and give them a cue on when to open the throttle, ya know scream "now" or something like that.

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make friends with other riders who are faster. They have to be close enough in skill that they won't pull away after one corner. I find it a lot easier to stay on it longer, brake later and harder and carry more speed if I'm following someone and can match their timing. Some times it's good to work on section, like pick out three turns in a row, preferably close together and practice just that section for a while.

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make friends with other riders who are faster. They have to be close enough in skill that they won't pull away after one corner. I find it a lot easier to stay on it longer, brake later and harder and carry more speed if I'm following someone and can match their timing. Some times it's good to work on section, like pick out three turns in a row, preferably close together and practice just that section for a while.

This

I am amazed at how much faster I am when I am withhutd that are just slightly faster than me...makes you come into corners harder come out earlier etc. etc. try and ride with guys that are just slightly better than you

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It will just take time to build his confidence. My son Jake has now started to learn how to steer the bike with the rear tire in the corners. He couldn't start doing this until his corner entry picked up. Then with nice ruts and berms he learned to get on the gas right away and the rear tire stays hooked in the rut or berm and will carry him out.

 

Getting the gas early to start the rear tire hooked in.

jakecoyote2_zps3d5ff8eb.jpg

 

Coming out of the corner, roosting it all the way through.

jakecoyote3_zpsfbe3391c.jpg

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