How do you Know if your Rebound Is set right ?

Compression i kinda get , but with  Rebound what are we looking for to get it right ? All ive done is set it in the middle and hope for the best to be honest , but im sure it  can transform the bike if set right .

Since no one else replied, let me start with the basics.. Do you have the right springs on the bike for your weight? That is step 1. After you get the right springs on the bike, step 2 is setting your sag. After that, I would set the rebound (all settings actually) back to factory settings as indicated in your Owners, or service, manual. Then ride the bike and see how it feels.

 

I usually know when my rebound is set too soft, or FAST, when the rear end kicks side to side on little jumps that just barely get the bike airborne. If the rear end kicks, I set the rebound slower/harder a few clicks and ride it again. I keep adjusting harder, or slower, until the kicking stops and then leave it there. This might not be the right way to set rebound but it has worked for me in the past. As I mentioned above, do a search and read as much as you can and then experiment to see what works best for you.

I'm far from an expert... rider or suspension tuner.... but I'll add my $.02.  First, I can't really notice minor changes offroad.  It was only after I started getting faster on the MX track that I could notice the differences.  So, to add to the above, I would also test in acceleration and braking bumps and increase (harder, slower) rebound 2 clicks at a time until the back settles down to your liking.  Then keep adding rebound till you feel it get worse, then back off a click or two.  But I wouldn't stop there.  I would try much less (softer, faster) rebound so you know what too little feels like.  Of course, keep a detailed log of your changes so you can come right back to the best setting.

Edited by bg10459

Agree w/ all the above.  For off-road I run R balanced evenly front & rear. 

Agree w/ all the above.  For off-road I run R balanced evenly front & rear. 

Define "balanced evenly".

Forgot to mention that a lot of people watch the attitude of the bike when jumping to set rebound. If it constantly noses up, then you know rebound on the front forks is too fast. If it noses down and tries to land on the front tire, then rebound on the rear tire is too fast.

 

If the bike is leaving jumps and landing basically level, then this indicates that the rebound is set correctly. Either that or you are making a lot of adjustments mid-air.

Run through some rollers or some whoops at a faster pace than normal and you will instantly know what you need to do with your rebound... rebound helps control how fast the suspension pushes back to normal static position. You want it fast enough to get keep it in the meat of the stroke, but slow enough that it does not return to the top of the stroke allowing the bike to buck you all over the place. Not only through the rollers/ whoops, but also through the corners. If you are getting a lot of deflection odds are that your rebound is too fast. I then try to balance the two areas.

 

Normally if it performs well in the corners and is manageable in the rollers/ whoops, it will perform well everywhere else. 

 

Just my .02... I'm no suspension guru by any means but those are some of the clues I use when setting up my suspension. I honestly don't pay any attention to what it does while jumping. I can compensate for that with body position as well as throttle and brake.

Edited by BDubb106

Above post well put.  That beater terrain makes it easy to dial in,  you'll feel if R is faster on one end when you're using all the stroke pounding the whoops & G-outs. 

Run through some rollers or some whoops at a faster pace than normal and you will instantly know what you need to do with your rebound... rebound helps control how fast the suspension pushes back to normal static position. You want it fast enough to get keep it in the meat of the stroke, but slow enough that it does not return to the top of the stroke allowing the bike to buck you all over the place. Not only through the rollers/ whoops, but also through the corners. If you are getting a lot of deflection odds are that your rebound is too fast. I then try to balance the two areas.

 

Normally if it performs well in the corners and is manageable in the rollers/ whoops, it will perform well everywhere else. 

 

Just my .02... I'm no suspension guru by any means but those are some of the clues I use when setting up my suspension. I honestly don't pay any attention to what it does while jumping. I can compensate for that with body position as well as throttle and brake.

That deflection thing is interesting. Most think deflection is caused by too stiff compression and start there. Gonna have to try that.

That deflection thing is interesting. Most think deflection is caused by too stiff compression and start there. Gonna have to try that.

I feel that it is a combination... I set compression to where it feels the best on "most" of the track. Then I go back through and set rebound to where it feels the best in combination with the compression. 

 

 

Like I said, I am no pro tuner, so I could be wrong but this method works for me.

Edited by BDubb106

I feel that it is a combination... I set compression to where it feels the best on "most" of the track. Then I go back through and set rebound to where it feels the best in combination with the compression. 

 

 

Like I said, I am no pro tuner, so I could be wrong but this method works for me.

An elusive combination.

An elusive combination.

For sure. But once you get close it's as simple as fine tuning. Once I get my rebound close so the back end doesn't jump around I readjust compression so that the bike rides in the meat of the stroke when I start weighting the front in a corner.

I'm kind of in the same boat.  2013 KX450f.  I revavled my shock with race tech gold valve kit.  the bike handles really well in turns (in not fast at all).  Not too stiff on landings but i'm only 2 clicks out on the rebound and it still wants to nose down on most jumps, and once in a while on the jump it will kick to the left.  I don't know if it's in the shock tuning or the front to back are off.  I also have my forks slid up about 7mm.  i actually have to alter my riding style and get back when I jump, although before the revalve I used to be able to get my shoulders over the bars and be good.

I'm kind of in the same boat.  2013 KX450f.  I revavled my shock with race tech gold valve kit.  the bike handles really well in turns (in not fast at all).  Not too stiff on landings but i'm only 2 clicks out on the rebound and it still wants to nose down on most jumps, and once in a while on the jump it will kick to the left.  I don't know if it's in the shock tuning or the front to back are off.  I also have my forks slid up about 7mm.  i actually have to alter my riding style and get back when I jump, although before the revalve I used to be able to get my shoulders over the bars and be good.

Most race tech rebound settings are to light and generally need a few extra face shims then recomended

When I push on back it doesn't spring up, its on the slower side, seems perfect. Not sure if that's a good test or not.

When I push on back it doesn't spring up, its on the slower side, seems perfect. Not sure if that's a good test or not.

 

I don't think it is......that's one simple controlled movement in a shop floor. Not really close to what you feel in the real world.....

I talked to racetech and he gave a good explainatio about having the shock revalved and forkss not. So anybody have good valving stack for stock forks? Novice, motocross, 220 lbs no gear, 37yo.

I have some awesome stacks for an RMZ for a rider with your stats, but I don't know how well they would do in your Kawi lol.  

Run your rebound out as far as your comfortable.  Kicking is 99% compresssion, its deflecting off the bump instead of absorbing it.  If you dont believe me record it and watch frame by frame, its a GIANT misconception that kicking is rebound.  You lose traction with overly slow rebound but the bike will "feel" stable with slow rebound.  slow rebound is good in the sand however

Here is what race tech saidWithout the info, our Head of R&D is assuming your fork valving is still stock.  He said this will cause the bike to be extremely unbalanced because the stock fork valving is setup for about a 150 lb. rider.  With your shock spring rate, the front will blow through and absorb the takeoffs while the back will be holding itself up causing it to kick.  Also, we recommend you run the forks flush with the clamps for proper geometry and to help improve traction.

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