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Switch from 4 stroke to two stroke?

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Currently I have a crf150f and plan to get a cr85 in the near future. In my 11 years of riding, I've yet to ride a two stroke. How difficult is the transition? What do I need to know to make hair successful? Thanks!

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i have both a 4 stroke and 2 stroke, i just got my 2 stroke a while ago and im glad i didn't sell my 4 for me i like the consistent power with the 4 stroke more, if i were to pick id stick with a 4 stroke just step up to like a 250 4 stroke 

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Currently I have a crf150f and plan to get a cr85 in the near future. In my 11 years of riding, I've yet to ride a two stroke. How difficult is the transition? What do I need to know to make hair successful? Thanks!

 

DirtSkyDirt--are you a woman (profile pic)?  I only ask because of height/muscular considerations for what bike you can physically handle.  Four strokes are smoother, easier to ride.  I ride a two stroke in the woods, enduro riding, because the two strokes are more nimble and responsible for instant braappp out of the corners through blind terrain.  Motocross is where four strokes reign supreme, also for open desert offroad racing.  

 

To transition from a four stroke to the smoker, you'll find yourself worn out physically from the two stroke comparatively.  The strokers are easier to ride, but tend to be less aggressive (I know, I'll take a lotta flack for that one).  The modern four strokes have definitely stepped up their competitive game and have taken a large share of the market, for good reason too.  They are lighter an handle better than years before, but the advantages of two strokes still remain: responsiveness, light, easy to work on, lower maintenance costs.  

 

What kind of riding do you do?

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DirtSkyDirt--are you a woman (profile pic)?  I only ask because of height/muscular considerations for what bike you can physically handle.  Four strokes are smoother, easier to ride.  I ride a two stroke in the woods, enduro riding, because the two strokes are more nimble and responsible for instant braappp out of the corners through blind terrain.  Motocross is where four strokes reign supreme, also for open desert offroad racing.  

 

To transition from a four stroke to the smoker, you'll find yourself worn out physically from the two stroke comparatively.  The strokers are easier to ride, but tend to be less aggressive (I know, I'll take a lotta flack for that one).  The modern four strokes have definitely stepped up their competitive game and have taken a large share of the market, for good reason too.  They are lighter an handle better than years before, but the advantages of two strokes still remain: responsiveness, light, easy to work on, lower maintenance costs.  

 

What kind of riding do you do?

4 strokes are not supreme in motocross, neither are two strokes. going from a crf150 to a cr85 isn't a jump or anything really, if you decide on a two stroke I would get a 125 and just lower the forks and sag if your short or a 250f and do the same

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Or if you feel that you are to small for the "big bikes" try the CRF150R, this is a 4T that is smaller and lighter than the 105F (replaced the cr85) or the Kawasaki KX100 basically an 85 big wheel with a kick. I'm assuming that you are trail riding, being that you ride a 150F and (IMO) the KX100 will be much friendlier in the woods than a CR85. The KX has a power valve which helps with the lower RPM riding. If you are riding a 2t in the woods I would recommend putting on a fly wheel weight.

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Currently I have a crf150f and plan to get a cr85 in the near future. In my 11 years of riding, I've yet to ride a two stroke. How difficult is the transition? What do I need to know to make hair successful? Thanks!

 

 

Curling iron,hairspray and a little luck

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Currently I have a crf150f and plan to get a cr85 in the near future. In my 11 years of riding, I've yet to ride a two stroke. How difficult is the transition? What do I need to know to make hair successful? Thanks!

You won't have any problems jumping on a 2 stroke.

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To transition from a four stroke to the smoker, you'll find yourself worn out physically from the two stroke comparatively.

FWIW - my 4T used to leave me absolutely worn out due to the extra weight and size. Since going back to a 2T I don't find myself nearly as tired and can ride longer.

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I recently made the switch to a 2-stroke and it took me a month or two to really get used to it (I only get to ride on the weekends).  The biggest thing to get used to was how much I need to use the brakes on the 2-stroke vs my 4-stroke.  I have to say though riding the 2-stroke has really improved my braking abilities.  A cr85 would be a huge improvement over the crf150f which is a trail bike with super soft and non-adjustable suspension.

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DirtSkyDirt--are you a woman (profile pic)? I only ask because of height/muscular considerations for what bike you can physically handle. Four strokes are smoother, easier to ride. I ride a two stroke in the woods, enduro riding, because the two strokes are more nimble and responsible for instant braappp out of the corners through blind terrain. Motocross is where four strokes reign supreme, also for open desert offroad racing.

To transition from a four stroke to the smoker, you'll find yourself worn out physically from the two stroke comparatively. The strokers are easier to ride, but tend to be less aggressive (I know, I'll take a lotta flack for that one). The modern four strokes have definitely stepped up their competitive game and have taken a large share of the market, for good reason too. They are lighter an handle better than years before, but the advantages of two strokes still remain: responsiveness, light, easy to work on, lower maintenance costs.

What kind of riding do you do?

Yes, I am a girl! I'm real lag set on getting a two stroke, I like the 150r but not as much as I think I would an 85. I'm 5' so the 150f is already a beast to me with the height and weight

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Or if you feel that you are to small for the "big bikes" try the CRF150R, this is a 4T that is smaller and lighter than the 105F (replaced the cr85) or the Kawasaki KX100 basically an 85 big wheel with a kick. I'm assuming that you are trail riding, being that you ride a 150F and (IMO) the KX100 will be much friendlier in the woods than a CR85. The KX has a power valve which helps with the lower RPM riding. If you are riding a 2t in the woods I would recommend putting on a fly wheel weight.

I'm dead set on riding red, kx100 isn't an option! I have a track at my house that I ride the 150f on, no major jumps or anything too bad for what he can handle. I'm looking to get an 85 to start some racing!

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Yes, I am a girl! I'm real lag set on getting a two stroke, I like the 150r but not as much as I think I would an 85. I'm 5' so the 150f is already a beast to me with the height and weight

Really set** I'm slacking today

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I recently made the switch to a 2-stroke and it took me a month or two to really get used to it (I only get to ride on the weekends). The biggest thing to get used to was how much I need to use the brakes on the 2-stroke vs my 4-stroke. I have to say though riding the 2-stroke has really improved my braking abilities. A cr85 would be a huge improvement over the crf150f which is a trail bike with super soft and non-adjustable suspension.

So a lot more braking? I've also heard a lot about more shifting, not really sure on that. My dad wasn't sure, he's never ridden a four stroke, it's hard for him to compare!

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Currently I have a crf150f and plan to get a cr85 in the near future. In my 11 years of riding, I've yet to ride a two stroke. How difficult is the transition? What do I need to know to make hair successful? Thanks!

 

First of all,Welcome.

This is a big transition. Do you have an experience riding two strokes? It is a different world. I am only 16 years old but on a 450F, but I have had owned bikes in many other classes. I had 08 CRF150R and can I honestly say it amazed me and my friends, back when I was 13. All of my friends had KTM and Honda 85 2 strokers, and I can honestly say the 150R would kill them on the track and trails. Since you are a little shorter. I would look at a small wheel version. Do you really have your heart set on a 85? Do you know anyone that owns one that you can ride?

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FWIW - my 4T used to leave me absolutely worn out due to the extra weight and size. Since going back to a 2T I don't find myself nearly as tired and can ride longer.

 

Size? You'll have to explain that to me.  

 

Back in August I rode a 250 2t around arguably one of the most demanding tracks there is (Unadilla). Great fun bike to ride, but not competitively. I found it more demanding to ride around this track with massive elevation changes because I was constantly shifting and trying to keep the revs in the powerband. If the bike wasn't in that very small range, I would case tables, not clear step ups, and just drop the thing in corners. In the end, that only made it more demanding for me. 

Edited by hondacrfinct

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