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Changing fork springs

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I was bored and randomly came across a set of racetech fork springs for my weight for $65 shipped. I'm willing to order them right now if I can install them without a hassle. I've found some vague instructions/videos from my searching, but at this point I still don't know if I'm capable. Is it as easy as loosening the triple clamp, taking off the cap, and popping out the spring and dropping a new one in? I feel naive thinking its that easy.

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It really depends on your mechanical ability. For some, it's really easy. For others, you could create a lot of problems for yourself if you don't know what you are doing, and for example strip a bolt(s), or strip a clicker.. Or damage the bushings.. Or any myriad of other issues.

 

If you follow the videos you see on youtube you should be able to do this.. But please note it does take some special tools to do the job right.

 

I would ask a friend to help you that has done this type of work before that hopefully has the tools that are needed. Having someone knowledgeable there to assist you your first time could be the difference between a 2 hour successful job, and you ending up taking the pieces in boxes to a professional to get sorted out.

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It really depends on your mechanical ability. For some, it's really easy. For others, you could create a lot of problems for yourself if you don't know what you are doing, and for example strip a bolt(s), or strip a clicker.. Or damage the bushings.. Or any myriad of other issues.

 

If you follow the videos you see on youtube you should be able to do this.. But please note it does take some special tools to do the job right.

 

I would ask a friend to help you that has done this type of work before that hopefully has the tools that are needed. Having someone knowledgeable there to assist you your first time could be the difference between a 2 hour successful job, and you ending up taking the pieces in boxes to a professional to get sorted out.

 

The videos I saw were kind of lame, couldn't really find what I was looking for besides some complete fork rebuilds. The only way I could do it comfortably is leaving the forks on the bike and not having to drain the oil. And yeah, I'm that guy, when I learn a job for the first time I bend this and strip that. My suspension has just been serviced though so nothing should be locked up. And I forgot to ask the question, but you already answered it, special tools, not sure what ones I would need for the job to do it right.

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what bike do you have and year?

 

2001 cr125

 

Edit: I just looked in my service manual it looks incredibly easy. Except its never that easy for me.

 

They show removing the forks from the triple clamps, removing the fork cap with a wrench and then using a crescent wrench to hold the spring and guide while you lift it out. Then I assume just drop the new spring on the guide, put it back in there, and cap it off again?

Edited by dan2581

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Rocky Mountian has videos that will help you. You need to look at the cartridge fork seal replacement video. Not the twin chamber video. http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/Video/93

 

I believe the video is of KYB forks. It should get you very close.

 

Good luck and send pics if you need advice.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y43k1qFVGW4

 

If the process is as easy as getting to removing the spring at 1:43...I could do each fork in 15-30 minutes. I didn't see the need for any specialty tools, just a socket and a wrench. Looks so easy, am I just making a big deal? I feel like I always hit a brick wall when I do an 'easy' job. Also he didn't drain the fork oil, does this mean I can do the procedure without messing with the fork oil?

Edited by dan2581

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Yes it is a open chamber fork that is about it.  When you prepare to re assemble make sure you run the jam nut on the dampening rod back down to the begging of the threads, then screw the cap on to the dampening rod. the cap should stop and leave a small space between the cap and the jam nut, at  this point the jam nut will unscrew up the dampening rod to meet the cap. Torque to about 20 foot pounds.

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I'm not familiar with your specific type of forks. I have an 01 CR250R that has the twin chamber design. I had to use a 50MM cap wrench to get the inner chamber out. Maybe your forks are different. On my forks, I would not attempt to remove the cap without the proper wrench. Otherwise it could damage the threads cap.

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Finally took my "~$40 bag of change" to coinstar....

 

After pissing off the people at the customer service desk making clanking noises for 20 minutes, I walked away with $220 cash!!! Holy shit I needed that.

 

So the first thing I did is ordered those springs. Should be here thursday, figured i'd chime in and post an update, becuase I'm sure ill be back thursday bitching about how this comes off or why that won't work.

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Well just a final update. Got the springs today and gave it a shot. It was as easy as it looked. Only part that sucked is that the nut on the damping rod was not flush with the bottom of the fork cap, so I had to shim another wrench on top of my wrench to compress the spring enough to hold the nut. It was about an inch below the fork cap on the damping rod.

 

Other than that, I could have done that at the track haha!

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