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Steering stabilizer for the DRZ400SM?

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Having previously had a nice tank slapper after hitting a pothole on the freeway on my GSXR at freeway speeds that I was somehow able to ride out of, I am a fan of steering stabilizers. I definitely want to get one for my ZSM. Are the Scotts and GPR the main ones available? My understanding is that the Scotts only damps from center out whereas the GPR also damps out to center as well. For twisties, tracks, freeway, and some dirt excursions, which is recommended?

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Having previously had a nice tank slapper after hitting a pothole on the freeway on my GSXR at freeway speeds that I was somehow able to ride out of, I am a fan of steering stabilizers. I definitely want to get one for my ZSM. Are the Scotts and GPR the main ones available? My understanding is that the Scotts only damps from center out whereas the GPR also damps out to center as well. For twisties, tracks, freeway, and some dirt excursions, which is recommended?

There are 2 kinds of Scotts, one for dirt, one for street. I have a Scotts, love it, so I'm biased, either one would be good I'm sure.

 

If I have this right, the street version damps both ways and is marked by an "S". The dirt version only damps one way. If you're buying used and can see the serial number, call Scotts, I think the guys name is James, and he can tell you everything about it by that number. There are more street versions available than dirt, at least when I was looking, and they would be a good thing to have. They can also service it if need be. Highly recommend

Edited by Signman606
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+100% to the Scotts FTW!!! Did not know they had diff versions for street or dirt??? Going to look that one up...

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+100% to the Scotts FTW!!! Did not know they had diff versions for street or dirt??? Going to look that one up...

 

Originally Posted by via Jake at Scott's Performance

Scotts manufactures 2 different stabilizers, a road bike version and an off-road version. Both units share the same physical size and appearance; the main differences are in the valving design. Below is a very brief description of the differences between the 2 styles.

The off-road damper is a non-rebound stabilizer, which means, as it sweeps away from center it has damping but the moment it changes direction back toward center the damping is free until it reaches center again, hence the term non-rebound or free-rebound. This was an important development in the off-road damper and is what makes our damper work so well. Its design is to allow the rider to correct for constant slides associated with off-roading while not fighting with the damping forces back to center. It's a serious advantage for the off-road rider. This feature helps prevent the common syndrome known as arm pump. Our stabilizer is the only one made with this feature.

The road bike damper design requires a totally different function and therefore is a rebound damper. A road bike is primarily leaned, not steered, and the damping forces need to be absorbed in both directions to maintain constant stability, due to the nature of the energy needing to be absorbed.

Can they be interchanged? Yes.

Are you receiving all the advantages you could by using the off road unit on a road bike 

application or vice versa? No.

Is there a big difference? That is an individual opinion. Using your dirt bike damper on your road bike would still be a vast improvement over no damper at all and the same goes for using a road bike damper on a dirt bike. Some customers who have tried switching from one to the other say, they feel no difference. Others claim there is a huge difference. So you see, it's truly personal preference. There are other internal differences between the 2 stabilizers which would take a lot longer to explain. The best bet is always to use the right damper for the right 

application. However, we could not tell you that they don't work when switched for the other application; it's just that they work better when used as designed for the right application.

There are always specific 

applications that might favor one type or the other depending on the situation. We make our suggestions based on our testing and what the majority of our customer base prefers. You have the option to specify whichever unit you prefer when ordering.

Thank you,

Jake

Scotts Performance

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Thanks for that post Eric. Very informative. I went to Scotts site and read through almost everything and did not find any references to what was said above. I truly dig my Scotts damper. Changed my life off road. The DR-Z was so unstable I was always white knuckled and napping. With the addition of a fork brace and the Scotts it was truly tamed down and kept me online and upright a huge percentage of the time. Naps are a lot rarer now. That coupled with my suspension changes that were done by Pro_Action. My arms feel way better after a full days riding...if I ever get one in anyways ;)

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There are 2 kinds of Scotts, one for dirt, one for street. I have a Scotts, love it, so I'm biased, either one would be good I'm sure.

 

If I have this right, the street version damps both ways and is marked by an "S". The dirt version only damps one way. If you're buying used and can see the serial number, call Scotts, I think the guys name is James, and he can tell you everything about it by that number. There are more street versions available than dirt, at least when I was looking, and they would be a good thing to have. They can also service it if need be. Highly recommend

For all you Scotts dirt model users, how does it handle on the freeway? Does it soak up head shake from potholes and such fine? Any situations where you would have preferred having the street model instead (in which case I'd probably opt for the cheaper GPR)?

 

I'm a former sportbike canyon carver looking to get into novice dirt with my knobbied SM... and maybe have some fun again in the twisties/track down the road.

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For all you Scotts dirt model users, how does it handle on the freeway? Does it soak up head shake from potholes and such fine? Any situations where you would have preferred having the street model instead (in which case I'd probably opt for the cheaper GPR)?

 

I'm a former sportbike canyon carver looking to get into novice dirt with my knobbied SM... and maybe have some fun again in the twisties/track down the road.

 

Hahaha...sorry Dave, don't have a freeway, gave that up and left it for you Californians!! Soak up headshake....yep, absolutely no side to side movement what so ever, that's why I've posted that you can go much faster in iffy situations where the handlebar used to move, now it doesn't, so it's all about balance and going forward. No situations where I would have wished for the street model.......mostly because I ride 95% offroad. Marquez posted a Scotts information link above, you should read it if you haven't already.....they put things into words better than me. Now that I have it, wouldn't be without it honestly.....like it that much! For wanting to ride offroad with your SM it seems like a good investment, since it'll be good on the road too. By chance know anyone who has one to try?

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Hahaha...sorry Dave, don't have a freeway, gave that up and left it for you Californians!! Soak up headshake....yep, absolutely no side to side movement what so ever, that's why I've posted that you can go much faster in iffy situations where the handlebar used to move, now it doesn't, so it's all about balance and going forward. No situations where I would have wished for the street model.......mostly because I ride 95% offroad. Marquez posted a Scotts information link above, you should read it if you haven't already.....they put things into words better than me. Now that I have it, wouldn't be without it honestly.....like it that much! For wanting to ride offroad with your SM it seems like a good investment, since it'll be good on the road too. By chance know anyone who has one to try?

Thanks, I read it before. Just wanted more personal accounts in order to make a better informed decision. =) For anyone that might be interested, I also found an account of a racer who accidentally used a dirt version on the track and had bad results, though he doesn't say how fast he was going or describe in detail the circumstances of the crash.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=2042021&postcount=28

 

I mainly commute with my SM at the moment, but once I get my Shinko 244s on there, I'll be hitting the dirt and canyon cruising (not carving!) on the weekends. I still can't get past that tank slapper on the freeway I had with the GSXR though. I think I easily could have been roadkill considering the number of cars I was surrounded by and the speeds they were traveling at. I don't want to be ill-prepared for when such a situation presents itself again.

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Thanks, I read it before. Just wanted more personal accounts in order to make a better informed decision. =) For anyone that might be interested, I also found an account of a racer who accidentally used a dirt version on the track and had bad results, though he doesn't say how fast he was going or describe in detail the circumstances of the crash.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=2042021&postcount=28

 

I mainly commute with my SM at the moment, but once I get my Shinko 244s on there, I'll be hitting the dirt and canyon cruising (not carving!) on the weekends. I still can't get past that tank slapper on the freeway I had with the GSXR though. I think I easily could have been roadkill considering the number of cars I was surrounded by and the speeds they were traveling at. I don't want to be ill-prepared for when such a situation presents itself again.

 

Just read that Adv.rider post and don't get it. He didn't supply any details so it's hard to put in perspective. And, I don't know what a tank slapper is and it's also not clear in the description.

 

The dirt damper keeps the deflection from happening, the movement away from center doesn't happen, so any rock, rut, root.....whatever it happens to be, won't deflect the bar away from going straight. No way will you have the bar jerked out of your hands. I have had that happen before while standing up and was instantly over the front in a heap......

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Just read that Adv.rider post and don't get it. He didn't supply any details so it's hard to put in perspective. And, I don't know what a tank slapper is and it's also not clear in the description.

 

The dirt damper keeps the deflection from happening, the movement away from center doesn't happen, so any rock, rut, root.....whatever it happens to be, won't deflect the bar away from going straight. No way will you have the bar jerked out of your hands. I have had that happen before while standing up and was instantly over the front in a heap......

Tank slappers are when you get massive head shake. When I hit that huge pothole at 70mph, the oscillation from the deflection grew suddenly and rapidly. I thought I was going down for certain but I loosened up on the bars (thanks to Keith Code, 20k mi of seat time, and dumb luck) while maintaining a constant throttle and the oscillation thankfully went away. Probably looked pretty gnarly to the pick up truck behind me. I was pretty tired at the time so I didn't think much of it, but thinking back on it, it could have been much worse.

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…..I don't know what a tank slapper is......

 

I assume you never rode an early 90's KX250 then !?   :ride: <------ x100 

 

I owned one for a short while, it was a great bike but it scared the crap out of me so I went running back to RM's

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Tank slappers are when you get massive head shake. When I hit that huge pothole at 70mph, the oscillation from the deflection grew suddenly and rapidly. I thought I was going down for certain but I loosened up on the bars (thanks to Keith Code, 20k mi of seat time, and dumb luck) while maintaining a constant throttle and the oscillation thankfully went away. Probably looked pretty gnarly to the pick up truck behind me. I was pretty tired at the time so I didn't think much of it, but thinking back on it, it could have been much worse.

 

Oscillations meaning left to right? I don't think that would happen with a damper then. Glad to hear nothing horrific happened. I would consider this a must have in this situation, since when I have a get-off or nap it's usually in dirt; ....... asphalt or cement @ 70mph sounds like you might not be getting up afterwards.

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Oscillations meaning left to right? I don't think that would happen with a damper then. Glad to hear nothing horrific happened. I would consider this a must have in this situation, since when I have a get-off or nap it's usually in dirt; ....... asphalt or cement @ 70mph sounds like you might not be getting up afterwards.

 

Yeah, it’s like dave said.... it's head shake x 100.  Where headshake is a minor oscillation and the handlebars only move a little, tank slappers are violent and the handlebars move quickly from lock to lock… usually ended in a highside and asphalt/dirt nap.  A steering damper helps alleviate this problem, but it's important to keep a light grip on the bars, don't try and fight it and stay on the throttle (you want to lessen the load on the front wheel).

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Yeah, it’s like dave said.... it's head shake x 100.  Where headshake is a minor oscillation and the handlebars only move a little, tank slappers are violent and the handlebars move quickly from lock to lock… usually ended in a highside and asphalt/dirt nap.  A steering damper helps alleviate this problem, but it's important to keep a light grip on the bars, don't try and fight it and stay on the throttle (you want to lessen the load on the front wheel).

 

wow, thanks for the info. Never experienced that and sounds like I don't want to.

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