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Bike service survey

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What is the amount of hours are you getting out of your bike?

Looking for particularly 4 strokes but just whatever is fine.  I would like to get some data and build a data base for amount of time on certain parts.

 

This is what i would like to get and hopefully we can have a place to look at and see what people are getting at trials and track and the skill level associated with the discipline.  Just a thought and would like to have some participating people.  

 

You may ask why?  My answer is how many people actually count the hours or miles on their bikes?  This would provide a guideline by bike model and year to help people know when to replace the most important parts ie. top and bottom ends.    

 

 

What I would like to see is

  • hours on piston and rings
  • hours on Crankshaft parts ex. crank, rod, bearings
  • hours on clutch
  • have the valves moved much?  How much?  and how long before you replaced them
  • If your on  a two stroke dont forget to add the type of premix and ratio of which your mixing

Dont forget the skill level and type of riding!  A beginning trail rider will for obvious reasons will get better life out of their engine than a pro motocrosser.

 

This would be made to help those who just started the sport and need a reference and would like to know how often to change these important parts as the other way is really expensive and what that is *kaboom*.  Just for them to get an idea

 

 

Ill Start out with myself first

 

Local Pro Motocross rider

2012 RMZ 450

80 hours on piston and rings

Valves moved once during break-in and havent since 

crankshaft assembly and bearings every 160 hrs

clutch is stock and still working fine, havent touched it.  Will check it over winter and analyze wear.

 

p.s. is always better!  If you check the clearance of your rings and piston like you should add that as well so we can see the wear. If you get 120 hours but the wear is 20x the limit then that's most likely very dangerous and you were darn lucky it didnt blow.  A compression test is awesome too as well as a leak test.  The more info the better.  Not to mention the clearance of the cylinder and honing it.  

 

Remember this is meant to be a guide for people. Its not set in stone and is not absolute but will give a general idea of when it should be replaced and is much better and more cost-effective rather than running it til it blows or replacing to early(Very rare!)

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On my 13 crf450r it had 85 hours then I rebuilt the top end. Valves moved twice. Not much at all.

Kept same valves till I rebuilt the crank and top end at 160 hours. Clutch was fine.

On my 14 yz450 I've got 41 hours on it with 0 valve movement. No clutch wear and everything's still good.

On my 06 cr250 I do top end about every 60-80 hours. So every crank at about 180 hours. Usually change clutch plates when I do the crank.

On the xr400 I sold I had over 300 hours on a piston. Zero valve movement. Clutch was great. Never did the crank and rebuilt top end twice.

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On my 13 crf450r it had 85 hours then I rebuilt the top end. Valves moved twice. Not much at all.

Kept same valves till I rebuilt the crank and top end at 160 hours. Clutch was fine.

On my 14 yz450 I've got 41 hours on it with 0 valve movement. No clutch wear and everything's still good.

On my 06 cr250 I do top end about every 60-80 hours. So every crank at about 180 hours. Usually change clutch plates when I do the crank.

On the xr400 I sold I had over 300 hours on a piston. Zero valve movement. Clutch was great. Never did the crank and rebuilt top end twice.

 

The XR400 makes me laugh.  A shop owner I knew in Cali said he hated selling XRs because they would sell the bikes and never see them again.  They were too reliable, didn't wear out.  But they don't perform like motocross bikes, and if you hop up the XR then it'll wear out like a moto bike.

 

Here's my KTM 300 smoker maintenance schedule. 

 

Every Ride

Wash Bike

Pipe/guard - clean/dry off

Chain - lube

Foot peg springs - lube

Shifter spring - lube

Wheel bearings - check

Steering head - check

Chain/sprockets - check

Wheels/hubs - clean

Axles - remove, grease

Brake pads - check

Spokes - check

Fork seals - clean

Forks - bleed

Air filter - clean

Damper/bracket - check

Shock bearings/heim joint - check

Shock/triple clamp bolts - torque

Antifreeze - fill

 

10 Hours

Gear oil - change

 

15 Hours

Exhaust o-rings - replace

Chain adjusters - antiseize

E-starter - grease, oil

Damper post - grease

Top end compression - check

Brake pedal bushing - grease

Kickstarter pivot - lube

Kickstarter spline - grease

Kickstand bushing - grease

Shifter spline - grease

Brakes - bleed

 

25 Hours

Clutch - bleed

Damper - bleed

Swingarm axle - grease

Shock - rebuild

Steering head - grease

 

50 Hours

Fork fluid - change

Antifreeze - change

 

125 Hours

Top end - replace

Spark plug - replace

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Your data is going to be terribly skewed.

 

Many take terrible care of thier bikes. Many only fix it when it stops running. Many only fix the totally fubard parts and often leave marginal parts in place, only to suffer a subesquent failure followed by 'that brand/model is crap'. Many are terrible mechanicas (though they try) and do not know what is good and what is bad. Not many people regularly check valves, do leak down tests and 'do the math'.

 

My own WR250F

08

60 hours

Valves never moved.

Leak down (five minute) at 5 hours 98%

Leak down (five minute) at 50 hours 98%

 

Oil changed every 10 hours or less (six months or if shifting feels 'notchy)

Air filter ever ride or 5 hours, which ever is greater or if in dusty conditions

Chain adjusted once at five hours

Suspension regreased annually

Spokes checked every three months

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The "motor guy" at our local track says for a decently fast guy piston and rings every 30 hours and crankshaft every 100-120 hours also new valves every 2-3 pistons

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The "motor guy" at our local track says for a decently fast guy piston and rings every 30 hours and crankshaft every 100-120 hours also new valves every 2-3 pistons

 

A mechanic I knew said that around 2004, he was rebuilding an expert desert racer's bike with 3 pistons a year, and a bottom end each year.  Valves were as needed, at least once a year. 

 

How far have strokers come in reliability in the last 10 years??  I've always been a smoker fan partly because of these $1000.00 plus rebuild costs.

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2004 Honda CRF450

 

1 hr adjust valves

 

5 hr replace valves

you had a good one!

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Oil change every 20-30 hours (sent samples out for analysis, this is how long my oil's good for)

Air filter when it needs it

Valves 2-3 months, whenver it needs it

Top end every year, cylinder replate every other year (otherwise just hone it out)

When I do the top end, I usually split the case and clean everything out, replace seals as needed.  Good going-through.

 

IMG_20130918_234134-L.jpg

 

21k+ miles on that bike.

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Your data is going to be terribly skewed.

 

Many take terrible care of thier bikes. Many only fix it when it stops running. Many only fix the totally fubard parts and often leave marginal parts in place, only to suffer a subesquent failure followed by 'that brand/model is crap'. Many are terrible mechanicas (though they try) and do not know what is good and what is bad. Not many people regularly check valves, do leak down tests and 'do the math'.

 

My own WR250F

08

60 hours

Valves never moved.

Leak down (five minute) at 5 hours 98%

Leak down (five minute) at 50 hours 98%

 

Oil changed every 10 hours or less (six months or if shifting feels 'notchy)

Air filter ever ride or 5 hours, which ever is greater or if in dusty conditions

Chain adjusted once at five hours

Suspension regreased annually

Spokes checked every three months

 

I developed my maintenance schedule to fit my riding terrain and skill.  I knew some older guys that put 300 hours on their bike's pistons, took the apart and they were in perfect condition.  But they never revved out the bike beyond 75% throttle.  Just to say, my regimen works for me.

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Oil change every 20-30 hours (sent samples out for analysis, this is how long my oil's good for)

Air filter when it needs it

Valves 2-3 months, whenver it needs it

Top end every year, cylinder replate every other year (otherwise just hone it out)

When I do the top end, I usually split the case and clean everything out, replace seals as needed.  Good going-through.

 

IMG_20130918_234134-L.jpg

 

21k+ miles on that bike.

 

That's an average of 29.36 mph.. are you riding dual sport or are you Mike Lafferty?? 

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That's an average of 29.36 mph.. are you riding dual sport or are you Mike Lafferty?? 

  • It's a dualsport, I ride it as such.
  • Tops out mid-90s.  Been there done that.
  • I have fun terrorizing soccer moms on interstate highways.
  • I have fun terrorizing soccer moms in the neighborhood.
  • I have a LOT of fun terrorizing soccer moms in 4x4 SUV's on snow and ice when I've got studs in my tires.
  • Truck gets 12mpg, bike gets 60-70.
  • Work sucks less when you ride a dirt bike there and back.

:excuseme:

 

Name's awfully close though. :)

 

i-NsCmPGH-L.jpg

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Title pretty much says everything. How often do you change your oil, clean the air filter, change out the fluids, etc.

 

I clean the air filter every 2-3 rides and change the oil every 3-4. I hardly even get my bike in the top range and tend to just cruise through the trails so i'm pretty relaxed about maintenance. 4 years later, still starts first kick.

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I think it all depends on the type of riding you do and what you feed your machine and how often you change the oil. If you're like me, only knowing 2 stroke bikes all my life, the only time I had problems with my bikes were when I would feed the 130 Octane Klotz racing fuel and tear it up. Other times when I would be too lazy to change the oil, and yet other times when I was just reckless. As the years have gone by, one thing I've noticed far too often is not having the need to do to much major work on my bikes because I take good care of them, if they go down, I go down with them, and of course, I don't abuse them like I use to. It all boils down to what each manufacture will suggest which is closer to what you're looking for, but they don't account to the type of riding and that's a variable that makes a big difference.

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The XR400 makes me laugh. A shop owner I knew in Cali said he hated selling XRs because they would sell the bikes and never see them again. They were too reliable, didn't wear out. But they don't perform like motocross bikes, and if you hop up the XR then it'll wear out like a moto bike.

Here's my KTM 300 smoker maintenance schedule.

Every Ride

Wash Bike

Pipe/guard - clean/dry off

Chain - lube

Foot peg springs - lube

Shifter spring - lube

Wheel bearings - check

Steering head - check

Chain/sprockets - check

Wheels/hubs - clean

Axles - remove, grease

Brake pads - check

Spokes - check

Fork seals - clean

Forks - bleed

Air filter - clean

Damper/bracket - check

Shock bearings/heim joint - check

Shock/triple clamp bolts - torque

Antifreeze - fill

10 Hours

Gear oil - change

15 Hours

Exhaust o-rings - replace

Chain adjusters - antiseize

E-starter - grease, oil

Damper post - grease

Top end compression - check

Brake pedal bushing - grease

Kickstarter pivot - lube

Kickstarter spline - grease

Kickstand bushing - grease

Shifter spline - grease

Brakes - bleed

25 Hours

Clutch - bleed

Damper - bleed

Swingarm axle - grease

Shock - rebuild

Steering head - grease

50 Hours

Fork fluid - change

Antifreeze - change

125 Hours

Top end - replace

Spark plug - replace

seems a bit extensive. ... unless your pro... and have a crew!

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2004 CRF450R / Owned 4-5 years / +38 Int.

Valves - Run to fail (200hrs last time)

Piston & Timing Chain - Replace @ 100hrs

Crank & Bearings/Seals - Replace @ 200hrs

Clutch - Run to fail (stock clutch currently @ 230hrs)

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2012 KTM 500EXC, 272hrs...oil changes when I feel needed, always run good fuel, Rotella and a stock of clean air filters. Only checked the valves 3 times, hasn't moved since day one. Probably will push it to 400hrs before I do something....

Engine has never been opened, stock clutch, etc etc....

Everything else is replaced when need be such as chain, sprockets, plastics, brake pads, blah blah blah.

All that being said I am very easy in my bikes. I'm not a clutch abuser, not a revver, and I fix and replace things before they break....

Edited by originalmonk

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So when you guys replace cranks at 160hrs - 200hrs, are they a wee bit off specs?  Or obviously out?  Or do you just plan it and do it as preventative maintenance? 

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