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Washington Teanaway's Yellow Hill looks to be in jeopardy?

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I just ran across this post on the Washington Fish and Game site stating that the Teanaway basin was recently sold to WA. State to be the first of their Community Forests.  The good news - it only grabs the trail heads for the Yellow Hill and Middle Fork trail on the Teanaway side with the majority of the ORV trail system remaining in the National Forest.  Bad news - the panel that controls the destiny of the use of the new "Community Forest" are representatives from groups that are in no way ORV friendly.  I hope they don't restrict access to Yellow Hill from that side!!

 

http://wdfw.wa.gov/news/sep3013b/

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someone could burn their little community forest to the ground if they are too stupid to be good neighbors, and I wouldn't feel a damn bit sorry for them.

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NOWHERE do they define their problem statement. What reasons did they have that drove the need for purchase of 50K+ acres of land that currently and historically has not been threatened by anybody?  I hate solution statements without a defined problem statement. Recipe for corrupt practices.

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This part does not sound promising for dirt bikers:

 

Will I still be able to use the recreation trails and facilities in the 

Teanaway?
The Legislature directed DNR to maintain and, where possible, expand 
recreational opportunities consistent with watershed protection, for 
activities such as hiking, fishing, hunting, horseback riding, camping, 
birding, and snowmobiling.
 
As part of its role to identify when and where recreation access will be 
maintained or expanded, the Teanaway Community Forest planning 
process will incorporate the latest biological, geological, soils, and 
management data to inform the citizen-based advisory committee as it 
makes draft recommendations to DNR about management decisions.
 
We should probably make an effort to be involved in the public opinion process, etc.
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I'd be happy to provide an opinion, I've signed up for the newsletter.  If anyone knows how we can put a voice to our thoughts I'm all ears.  No mention of mtb or dirt biking isn't a good sign.

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i sure don't want to be an outlaw. but, i'll be damned if i'm giving up yellow hill!!!!

 

edit: who the hell do they think is going to maintain that trail if they push the bikes out?

Edited by schrode
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Goldmark will traditionally go along with the committee, stacked with non motorized user's that are guided by a (biased) moderator to agree on what the DNR already decided before the public process. Then the timber sales side of dnr will do whatever they want without consulting the rec plan or needs.

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The majority of that area has been non-motorized for many years with the exception of the main road that leads through the campground areas to the trail heads for Yellow Hill and the two neighboring trails although I have seen plenty of guys riding through it to connect trails while out hunting.  The only good news is that the purchase does not include the majority of the Yellow Hill trail, just the trail head buts let's face it - a dead end trail is a dead trail.  In my opinion our only argument that would have a chance to work with that type of governing group is to swim downstream - we will continue to respect the forest protection that is already in place throughout the affected area but gracefully ask that we retain access to the long established trail heads that lead off property for the use and enjoyment of the recreational opportunities provided to responsible ORV enthusiasts by our National Forest.

 

It is troubling because the Yellow Hill trail is already listed as CLOSED on the WNF website with no updates or explanation.  The last update was back in June talking about the late snow melt???

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These trails are already "dead end" trails without legal ability to make loops unless you have permission from private land owner. Access between yellow hill trail and w. fork teanaway river trail was private land now DNR so they could block that too I guess. So the DNR has bought up the private ranch and marginal timber land south of the National Forest. Thank God the good trails remain on Nat'l Forest land. They can block access, I'll just do out and back. 

 

As for Y.H. trail being closed I know two people who rode it in late July. :ride:

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These trails are already "dead end" trails without legal ability to make loops unless you have permission from private land owner. Access between yellow hill trail and w. fork teanaway river trail was private land now DNR so they could block that too I guess. So the DNR has bought up the private ranch and marginal timber land south of the National Forest. Thank God the good trails remain on Nat'l Forest land. They can block access, I'll just do out and back. 

 

As for Y.H. trail being closed I know two people who rode it in late July. :ride:

 

If your friends do ride Yellow Hill and happen to catch any grief from a passing hiker about the trail being "closed" make sure to ask the hikers what their excuse is for being on a closed trail as well.  Just tell them that you will turn in the credit card receipt you found down the trail from them listing all of the crap Buffy and Kip just purchased at REI for their great wilderness adventure:)  The "closed" stipulation extends to all users, not just ORV.

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I'm gonna pray for a lightning storm to char 50K acres of expensive property. That might make 'em think twice before buying land and making it off limits to the public.  I've yet to see any real value come of these places. If they can't learn to deal with multi-use, they don't deserve it.

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Wonder how much the new "Community Forest Pass" will be. :banghead:

 

No real point in riding those former private lands. People like the general area for gnar. Not alot of gnar on the former private lands. 

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No real point in riding those former private lands. People like the general area for gnar. Not alot of gnar on the former private lands. 

 

I liked camping on that side. Also never heard the term community forest...

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I liked camping on that side. Also never heard the term community forest...

 

It's a ruse for the Yakima Basin Plan. By adding the area for ecosystem management purposes they sell it to the state legislature that the land will provide recreation too so they have greater chance of getting cash to purchase the land. Nobody had to declare exactly how multiple use it would be. It's a box they can check indicating they've purchased land near headwaters of Yakima River because without state ownership the land was THREATENED! by the private interests of landowners. 

 

Just a few years ago some of these parcels would have installed clean renewable energy! Teanaway Solar Reserve was the proposal. Lucky for the us state has purchased these lands and prevented big bad energy companies from raping the landscape. Yay DNR. 

 

Seattle Times has a good recent story on the Yakima Basin Plan and how it will be funded by us. It's really a public works project that would benefit agriculture and make nice with the tribes. The part that scares me is the reintroduction of salmon and bull trout to Lake Cle Elum. Quite naturally the watershed surrounding the lake will now have land management concerns for erosion. :blah:

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