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Feel out of control when standing....

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I feel so out of control when I'm standing. I am watching a lot of "enduro riding tips" videos on YouTube, and I can tell that standing up is CRUCIAL.

What are the keys to feeling comfortable standing on the bike?

One thing i'm thinking is that I'm not "moving" enough on the bike... These enduro guys look like they're constantly adjusting and shifting and really working their machines... But I just feel like I'm hanging on for dear life -- stiff and afraid to move around ...

Seat time is the key I guess .

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I feel so out of control when I'm standing. I am watching a lot of "enduro riding tips" videos on YouTube, and I can tell that standing up is CRUCIAL.

What are the keys to feeling comfortable standing on the bike?

One thing i'm thinking is that I'm not "moving" enough on the bike... These enduro guys look like they're constantly adjusting and shifting and really working their machines... But I just feel like I'm hanging on for dear life -- stiff and afraid to move around ...

Seat time is the key I guess .

Are your legs pretty straight, elbows up, and head above the bars? I used to stand straight up and basically lock my legs. I was super uncomfortable. I'm still needing to improve, but I can tell you once you consistently keep the elbows up you get so much more control. I like to go from standing, into turns (sitting) and repeat that a lot. I still need more practice but I'm feeling a lot more in control. It took a few 'close ones' to realize that standing gave me a benefit compared to sitting.

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time to start standing, i usually stand until I'm forced to sit down to make a corner, hill climb, ect. I might sit for a section then it's back to standing. You really do have a lot more control and can ride a lot more efficiently then when sitting. You do feel less connected to the bike, but it allows the bike to do things underneath you that would cause you to fall if you were sitting. Body position and technique do play a big roll. Learn to let the bike carry you through your legs, even through acceleration and braking. Minimize how much you use your arms, they will fatigue much faster then your legs. Look up the basic attack position. Proper body position might not feel very natural or energy saving at first. But eventually it should be your go to thing. When things start going wrong, you panic, don't know what to do, that last resort attack position will save you from that soil sample and you won't even be sure how you saved it.

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I stand prolly 99% of the time, very rarely is it smooth enough terrain wise to sit. and when I am seated I feel as if im almost out of control. but then again I don't spend much time in the saddle, usually just on the steep hills when traction is an issue or if we happen to be on a road or trail that will allow you to sit without getting beat up too badly

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Spend some time on a mouontain bike. Downhill mountain biking is where I learned to stand and be comfy standing.

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In sand move your butt back and pull back/up on the bars, keep some gas on even when slowing down. Ya Sand is very intimating to a new rider. I recently just returned to the sport after a 30 year lapse and ya I had to go through it as well. Also if it is strictly sand let some air out of your tires. I run them down to 7PSI front and back. Now if you have rocks etc in with the sand you have to keep the air pressure up to at least 10PSI to avoid flats. As far as sitting VS standing. Most younger guys stand and most older guys sit. I know a district 37 AMA enduro champion and he told me to sit and conserve energy when you can and stand when you have to. So if I am sitting when I come to sand I slide my butt back on the seat. Also dont forget to weight your outside foot peg when turning. This helps keep the tires planted so it does not wash out on you.

 

My bad, I just realized you said standing and not in sand.

Edited by Zrt1200

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One thing i'm thinking is that I'm not "moving" enough on the bike... These enduro guys look like they're constantly adjusting and shifting and really working their machines... But I just feel like I'm hanging on for dear life -- stiff and afraid to move around ...

Seat time is the key I guess .

 

Think you have diagnosed your problem and prescribed a cure too.

Try to learn to relax on the bike. Go out and ride some easy stuff slow, and just work on body position and being comfortable on the bike. Then work your way up to harder terrain and a faster pace There are times and places where you have to set, but the more you can stay off the seat, the better off you'll be.

As poconovfr said too, a mountain bike is an incredible training tool in many ways. I've started riding trail and XC again (after a several year hiatus), and am finding improvements in many things. Endurance, bike handling, etc...

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Same here. Just kinda' rediscovered downhilling again. Man is that spooky.Skinny ass tires,nervous little bike...kinda' makes the sphincter tighten up just thinking about it.

Anyway you pretty much have to stand on a downhiller.

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When you go out riding, try to do some laps standing the entire way. No need to try going fast. If you have to put a foot down in the corner, then go ahead. You can take your seat off to do this as well. Also, adjust your bike to suit you better standing. Move the bars forward, play with the levers, etc. The ultimate training tool, money permitting is a trials bike

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Well half the responses on here said to do exactly what you said you were already going to do which is ride standing up more... Not terribly helpful lol

 

 

OLHILLBILLY has some good input, get used to moving around on the bike. You noticed you're not moving around much and I move around on my bike like a damn gymnast. If I need to tip the bike to the right in order to make it smoothly around a rock, my body goes to the left to offset the weight and maintain balance. 

 

Another thing is that if you feel like you're just hanging on, lean INTO acceleration, and lean BACK when on the brakes. It takes a bit of practice for it to become muscle memory but once it does you won't get as tired standing up.

 

This last bit, funny enough made the biggest improvement to my riding, and I rarely see anyone except pro's working on it. Do balance exercises. Using a bosu ball or a balance board or anything you can dream up. I swear that when i started doing balance exercises my balance improved 10 fold, and riding got noticeably easier, especially standing up. I can stand on one foot on the end of a 2X4 while someone tosses me a medicine ball and keep my balance. Normally I bounce the ball off a house, but you get the idea. Balance is a HUGE benefit and will make life easier on the bike.

 

GL.

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Practice, I use to find that I didn't like doing my whole trail, and couldn't do it all standing, but after a long period of practice, I come to be able to do every single thing standing.

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Maybe, just maybe, your bars are to short/tall for you. I bought taller bend bars and risers...WOW what a difference it made when standing up! Then I had my fork pro built and that helped even more. Don't grip with your knees, grip w/your ankles, it makes going from standing to sitting smoother and you'll find your riding position much faster....(I was taught this at an MX class). They also said not to bend your knees much (don't lock your legs though).

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Grip the bike with your knees. That will stablize the bike. I'm the opposite, I think I stand too much.

hmm, I don't think you can ever stand enough. I agree with what you say, but there will be situation where you can't, and you need to pivot the bike underneath you.

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I am also busy learning to stand and ride. I must say I am getting more comfortable with standing. However can anybody tell me what is the correct standing technique? I know the technique of cornering while sitting and it does work well however when standing I do not know the correct technique for cornering.

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Unless you're trying to get over an "enduro specific" type of obstacle, like a rock garden or something similar, You will want to grip the bike with your knees, like an MX rider. BUT, when going over something like a rock garden, being loose and allowing the bike to move underneath you is crucial.

 

A way to gain balance in turns and straights is to do standing motos, stand up through the turns, on the straights, everywhere. If you are just a casual trail rider and you go out and ride a "never hit the same trail twice" type of ride, then the standing moto won't be as beneficial. I'd recommend finding a 1:30-2 minute lap of trails with logs, rocks, and turns, something you can practice the technique on over and over, until you master it.

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ride your practice trail standing. then turn your toes in towards the bike and ride it again. let it move around under you, it takes time to get used to it but ultimately it'll make you faster and tire you out less.

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Same here. Just kinda' rediscovered downhilling again. Man is that spooky.Skinny ass tires,nervous little bike...kinda' makes the sphincter tighten up just thinking about it.

Anyway you pretty much have to stand on a downhiller.

This made me chuckle. I grew up mountain biking and turned to road cycling and racing the several years and just got my first dirt bike not too long ago. I feel about my Yamaha they way you do about the mountain bike and I'm used to banging elbows with guys going through corners at 25+ mph on tires that are about 1/2 inch wide. 

 

I too need to learn to stand more. I noticed this past weekend I found myself naturally standing over obstacles to let the bike react under me just like my mountain bike would. It also feels a lot better not getting beaten up so badly by rocks, roots, logs, etc.

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Well half the responses on here said to do exactly what you said you were already going to do which is ride standing up more... Not terribly helpful lol

 

 

OLHILLBILLY has some good input, get used to moving around on the bike. You noticed you're not moving around much and I move around on my bike like a damn gymnast. If I need to tip the bike to the right in order to make it smoothly around a rock, my body goes to the left to offset the weight and maintain balance. 

 

Another thing is that if you feel like you're just hanging on, lean INTO acceleration, and lean BACK when on the brakes. It takes a bit of practice for it to become muscle memory but once it does you won't get as tired standing up.

 

This last bit, funny enough made the biggest improvement to my riding, and I rarely see anyone except pro's working on it. Do balance exercises. Using a bosu ball or a balance board or anything you can dream up. I swear that when i started doing balance exercises my balance improved 10 fold, and riding got noticeably easier, especially standing up. I can stand on one foot on the end of a 2X4 while someone tosses me a medicine ball and keep my balance. Normally I bounce the ball off a house, but you get the idea. Balance is a HUGE benefit and will make life easier on the bike.

 

GL.

what GL said ^^^^

 

basically its all about balance and relaxing.  if your arms, hands and lower back are getting tired chances are that you arent balanced on the bike very well.  a little drill i do occasionally  is while standing and rolling through some sections i will take my left hand off the bars.  if your standing and only using one hand you obviously better be balanced. i catch myself elaning back to much, usually at the start of a ride or race, so i will just roll a couple of turns slowly with one hand until i feel that natural balance point.....

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