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Quick chain question..

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Looking to replace my front & rear sprocket, along with my chain.

 

1st question, does dropping a tooth on my FRONT sprocket increase torque or top speed?

- I know dropping teeth on the REAR increases speed, I'm just not sure if its opposite for the front.

 

2nd Question, Im looking around for a good replacement chain, around the 100 dollar mark. Is it better to spend the extra 20 bucks (120$) for the stock kawy chain? Its a 520 -DID DMA chain off the oem parts tree. Or should I look at another product?

Specifically this one for 100 bucks- D.I.D 520 VX2 X Ring motorcycle Chain.

 
 
Thanks!

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Dropping a tooth in the front is the same as raising them in the back increases torque decreases TopSpeed

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Dropping one tooth in the front increases torque multiplication. Just not usually a good idea to go smaller than a 13 tooth on most bikes as it will greatly increase slider wear along with increased chain wear. Instead of going to a 12 tooth front, stay with a 13 and go 3-4 bigger in the rear.

As for the choice of the 2 chains you listed..  Unless your looking for, and desperately needing, every last 1/4 HP out of your bike (which is about all the non o-ring chain will gain for you), the DID X-ring is the way to go. It will last roughly 3 times longer than the stock Kawi DMA non o-ring chain, and apparently will cost you $20 less.

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Xring will last considerably longer than a non o ring or standard o ring chain. It also creates less friction due to less surface area contacting rollers. 

 

A Z chain is an even better choice. 

 

Who really cares about a fraction of 1 HP though. Buy the chain that will last the longest. 

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Well now I am confused, one of you says the x ring is better, and more long lasting, and the other states the opposite.

 

No confusion.  The comparison in both cases was against a non O ring chain.  The "X Ring" is still an "O ring" chain, just shaped like an X instead. As for which lasts longer, the DID X Ring chain versus a quality O ring chain, I don't know. Their marketing says it lasts 1.5 - 2 times longer.

Edited by Badunit

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mx31 front 51 rear. Got to do some reading on how to take the tires off the rims now!, Bought the tire spoon kit.

 

The key to changing tires is dropping the bead into the drop dead center of the rim.  I just changed tires this morning, here's the process which I follow:

  • Remove valve stem
  • Loosen rim lock until the nut is barely threaded to the rim lock stem, then hammer the rim lock as far as the nut will allow.  This creates slack in the tire.
  • Put tire on ground, jump up and down with feet opposite each other on both sides of rim.  This is to break the bead so you can insert tire irons.
  • Once bead is broken, insert both tire irons into the tire about 3" apart and pull up the bead one iron at a time.  If you cannot pull up both irons, don't force it too much.. you grabbed too much tire and must put the tire irons closer together.
  • Pull the entire bead off the rim, then remove the tube.
  • Flip the rim over, and pull the other bead off the rim SO THAT THE WHEEL IS INSIDE OF THE TIRE.  This seems counterintuitive or backwards, but I promise the rim will pull right out of the tire once the beads displaced.
  • Put on new tire, starting at the rim lock.  Push the rim lock as far into the tire as it will go to get it away from the drop dead center of the rim.  Havint the sprocket side down makes things easier, less chance of bloody knuckles.
  • Work your way around rim to finish installing the bead.
  • IMPORTANT: to insert the tube, start by feeding the valve stem into the rim hole.  To create room for this, take a tire iron and pull up the bead at the valve stemp hole (on the opposite side of the rim from where you are installing the tube).  Fold the iron completely behind the sprocket, and lay on downside.  Now the bead is pull up on the downside, and you will have 6" of room to fix your hands inside the tire to easily slip the valve stem in the hole.
  • Remove tire iron from the sprocket side and finish installing the tube.  Once installed, valve stem out, fill the tube with air and let the air hiss out, so you will know exactly where it is at all times.  This significantly helps prevent pinching the tube as you finish installing the final bead on the rim.
  • Start installing the final bead on the rim by using a handheld sledge to hammer the tire on as far as it will go.
  • Now use tire irons for the remaining amount.  As it gets more difficult to turn over the tire irons, you will have to take smaller bites of bead.  The last 1/3 of the tire is the most critical.  Try not to fold the tire iron completely over as you install the bead because this imposes danger of pinching the tube. Pull tire iron up vertical, then use handheld sledge to hammer on the bead.
  • To make it easier, use C clamps on the opposite side of the wheel from the bead you are installing.  Pinch the tire so the bead falls into the drop dead center of the rim.
  • Air it up to 40+ lbs of air to ensure the bead sets around the entire rim, you're good to go!

Showing you how is easier than telling you how.  Practice makes perfect changing tires.  I've changed probably over 100 tires in the last 10 years, it rarely goes smoothly, but you'll get it.

Edited by LovingOffroadPain
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When I put the tube in, should I pump some air into it?

just enough for it to hold its shape. Not so much that it puts pressure on the tire, but enough to keep it away from the bead or irons.

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The key to changing tires is dropping the bead into the drop dead center of the rim.  I just changed tires this morning, here's the process which I follow:

  • Remove valve stem
  • Loosen rim lock until the nut is barely threaded to the rim lock stem, then hammer the rim lock as far as the nut will allow.  This creates slack in the tire.
  • Put tire on ground, jump up and down with feet opposite each other on both sides of rim.  This is to break the bead so you can insert tire irons.
  • Once bead is broken, insert both tire irons into the tire about 3" apart and pull up the bead one iron at a time.  If you cannot pull up both irons, don't force it too much.. you grabbed too much tire and must put the tire irons closer together.
  • Pull the entire bead off the rim, then remove the tube.
  • Flip the rim over, and pull the other bead off the rim SO THAT THE WHEEL IS INSIDE OF THE TIRE.  This seems counterintuitive or backwards, but I promise the rim will pull right out of the tire once the beads displaced.
  • Put on new tire, starting at the rim lock.  Push the rim lock as far into the tire as it will go to get it away from the drop dead center of the rim.  Havint the sprocket side down makes things easier, less chance of bloody knuckles.
  • Work your way around rim to finish installing the bead.
  • IMPORTANT: to insert the tube, start by feeding the valve stem into the rim hole.  To create room for this, take a tire iron and pull up the bead at the valve stemp hole (on the opposite side of the rim from where you are installing the tube).  Fold the iron completely behind the sprocket, and lay on downside.  Now the bead is pull up on the downside, and you will have 6" of room to fix your hands inside the tire to easily slip the valve stem in the hole.
  • Remove tire iron from the sprocket side and finish installing the tube.  Once installed, valve stem out, fill the tube with air and let the air hiss out, so you will know exactly where it is at all times.  This significantly helps prevent pinching the tube as you finish installing the final bead on the rim.
  • Start installing the final bead on the rim by using a handheld sledge to hammer the tire on as far as it will go.
  • Now use tire irons for the remaining amount.  As it gets more difficult to turn over the tire irons, you will have to take smaller bites of bead.  The last 1/3 of the tire is the most critical.  Try not to fold the tire iron completely over as you install the bead because this imposes danger of pinching the tube. Pull tire iron up vertical, then use handheld sledge to hammer on the bead.
  • To make it easier, use C clamps on the opposite side of the wheel from the bead you are installing.  Pinch the tire so the bead falls into the drop dead center of the rim.
  • Air it up to 40+ lbs of air to ensure the bead sets around the entire rim, you're good to go!

Showing you how is easier than telling you how.  Practice makes perfect changing tires.  I've changed probably over 100 tires in the last 10 years, it rarely goes smoothly, but you'll get it.

+1 on this...oonly my luck on "mini's" is less than ideal!

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mx31 front 51 rear. Got to do some reading on how to take the tires off the rims now!, Bought the tire spoon kit.

good choice on dem tires!!!!!! braaap :ride:  :ride: :ride:  

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