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Refreshing my XR... Picking away at getting some new parts.

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I'm just wondering what people would recommend picking away at on my 04 XR4.

I'm thinking chain, new levers, new pegs, sprockets, maybe new wheels (for looks).

Besides this kind of stuff, are there any cheap things I might look at replacing/updating/upgading? Suspension is too much $$ for me at the moment!!

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You haven't priced wheels if you think suspension is too expensive.   ;)

  How much do you weigh?

Edited by MindBlower

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You haven't priced wheels if you think suspension is too expensive.   ;)

  How much do you weigh?

 

Beat me to it.

 

Chain and sprockets are relevant if their worn. Forget wheels and use that money for suspension.

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For $240 new, less used. The SINGLE best thing you can do to any XR: front and rear springs that will actually suspend your body weight.

 You won't believe the difference.  ;)

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+1 on suspension. get it sprung for your weight, and if you want to go a level higher, revalve for your riding style. I waited way too long to do suspension mods- rode for years with an undersprung bike. You'll thanks me later.

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Obviously, make sure all the basics are covered. #1 is riding gear that is appropriate for your riding. That's the most important, #2 is that all parts and systems function correctly on your bike. Example - don't buy new tires if your brakes don't work.

 

I've found many aftermarket "doo-dads" are just that. They do nothing to improve the performance or reliability of the machine over what was provided on it from the factory. I'm talking about "bling" parts here. Buyer beware on those.

 

What do you have on there now? You all stock? Gordon mods are cheap, just a couple jets and air filter.

 

What kind of riding do you do?

Edited by michigan400
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I ride in the woods around the town I live. But I've been watching ALOT of RedBull Signature Series hard enduro and can see where all of the skills on display on those races would help me on the trails I ride.

I live in Newfoundland. My island is known as "the rock" for a reason. It is a rock-island in the ocean. Some of our trails are very technical. Pretty decent sized rocks, elevation changes, fallen logs and trees from our wind storms (you "mainlanders" and Americans call them "hurricanes" -- we call em breezy days).

I am just learning (at 30 years of age) how to ride. I need to learn how to deweight and hop logs and other obstacles, right after I learn to pop a slow-wheelie.

The key to it all will be suspension, I think. Because right now when I try to deweight my bike doesn't pop back up, allowing me to loft/hop. It just kinda goes - blahhhhh....

Maybe suspension is the way to go. I thought I'd be looking at $1000+? But someone said $250 and now I'm interested.

Thanks guys...

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That helps. I would say handlebars of a taller bend to help your standing position. Or, bar risers that get them up and forward help even more. Definitely some bark busters. In case of a tip over you won't break your levers. Skid plate would be a good idea also. Sounds like slower, technical trails so I would say to gear down some. That will help you crawl over stuff easier and get the front end up and over stuff easier. Also, pick out some good tires that work on your trails. Maybe trials tire on the bike would be great for you with all the rocks.

 

How much do you weigh? Rear spring is good for most people so unless your over 220 lbs or so I'd leave it. Start with stiffer springs in the forks. Don't go overboard though, to stiff and the valving does not have enough rebound and your bike will handle like shit.

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I'm 210-220lbs depending on how much I eat while I'm at work on the oilsands camps in Alberta...

Where should I shop for the springs? Can I get the springs now and maybe look at revalving later?

I think the lower gearing might be a good idea for me as a newb to lofting the front... Might let me do it in a more controlled manner...

Okay, two more questions...

-Is there a place I can order suspension stuff and sprockets for my XR4?

-What front sprocket should I pick up for highway riding, which do I pick up for lower grunt, and how hard is it to swap between em on the fly as needed?

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I'm 210-220lbs depending on how much I eat while I'm at work on the oilsands camps in Alberta...

Where should I shop for the springs? Can I get the springs now and maybe look at revalving later?

I think the lower gearing might be a good idea for me as a newb to lofting the front... Might let me do it in a more controlled manner...

Okay, two more questions...

-Is there a place I can order suspension stuff and sprockets for my XR4?

-What front sprocket should I pick up for highway riding, which do I pick up for lower grunt, and how hard is it to swap between em on the fly as needed?

I haven't looked for XR parts in a while but I think XR's Only sells Eibach springs for the XR still. You can even call them and see what they say for spring weight. I would think .44 - .46 ( .40 kg/mm is stock ) would help out a lot but not be to "springy" with the stock damping. Crank your rebound adjusters in all the way.

15 tooth is stock size. 14 T will give more grunt / less speed. 16 T for more speed / less grunt. After you do it a couple times, it takes about 5-10 minutes to switch. I used to make marks on the chain adjusters for each size sprocket so adjusting the chain was quicker.

Rocky Mountain ATV/MC or Motorcycle Superstore would be good for handle bars, grips, barkbusters and stuff like that.

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