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Baja Trip Report

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This is the short story of a three-day 475 mile loop by my friend and I on an XR400 and XR250L last weekend.  We carried saddle bags, tools, and camping gear.  No chase-vehicle.


 


Friday morning we had breakfast at KM35 South of San Felipe and headed South to Gonzaga where we gassed up and continued South to Coco's Corner.  Coco showed me how he memorialized my broken clutch lever from a previous adventure within his collection.  Heading East from Cocos, we turned South through Calamujue sand wash finally reaching HWY 1.  We rode the slab to L.A. bay and stayed at Raquel and Larry's.  After a good night's sleep and a hearty breakfast, we gassed up and rode to San Borja and then on to Rosarito for lunch.  My buddy got a gallon of fuel and we headed a few miles South where we took a two-track to Punta Rosarito.  It was low tide, so we rode the smooth damp sand at wide open throttle for ten miles to Santa Rosalilita.  After a couple beers and stories at the market, we headed North to find a camping spot on the beach. We made a campfire and warmed our canned food.  With two apples for breakfast, we went North and took a road a few miles South of the silt beds leading to Chapala.  This very long route wound through a lush green canyon and joined HWY 1 about ten miles South of Chapala.  We rode the slab North to Chapala where we finally had a huge breakfast around eleven a.m.  We went back to Coco's and I made it back to Gonzaga having last fueled up in L.A. bay.  We had a major headwind and stopped again at Cowpatty's before heading home near Percebu.  


 


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Edited by Baja Rambler
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We rode a comfortable 150 miles per day.  
 
We carry our stuff with Paul Jr. saddlebags from Wal and lash everything with four cargo nets from HF.  I added a double-wall aluminum heat shield to my exhaust to protect the right saddle bag.  This worked out exceptionally well and never got more than luke-warm.

 

Join us, BTR.

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How's the Mobil 1 keeping up?

I have almost a thousand miles on it and it still shifts smooth.  Clutch works fine, too.  I did burn about a pint on this trip, though.

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Awesome ride and a hearty breakfast, can't be beat. Of course since there are no photos, this is all conjecture!

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After my DSLR was destroyed last year by the rear knobby, I am reluctant to take a camera but definitely need to solve this problem.  I did take a photo of our bikes at the end of the trip to show how we attach our gear.

 

Yeah, we had a lot of good food and many homemade salsas and tortillas.  

 

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Edited by Baja Rambler

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I have almost a thousand miles on it and it still shifts smooth.  Clutch works fine, too.  I did burn about a pint on this trip, though.

 

How much would you have burnt in dino oil?

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How much would you have burnt in dino oil?

 

Conventional oil was toast at 500 miles but consumption was similar.

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your choice of pre 96 xr's,is it because they have softer seats than the 96-on models mr. baja rambler?

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your choice of pre 96 xr's,is it because they have softer seats than the 96-on models mr. baja rambler?

 

 

The soft seat is definitely a plus on long rides. 

 

Also having cargo far enough back to be able to use the whole seat reduces fatigue.

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Awesome luggage solutions!

 

My buddy actually had room for a six-pack of Dos Equis in bottles.  It was the only beer they had cold in Santa Rosalilita.  We each packed out three empty bottles the next day over 100 miles of dirt road and didn't break any.  My bike doesn't have a rack yet so I just hook everything on with the bungee nets.  I had a sleeping bag and pad, tools and extra front and rear tubes, extra layers, fix-a-flat, and a pair of sneakers, etc.  I try to keep it under twenty pounds of extra gear and didn't notice a difference in handling.

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I would love to see some close up, higher resolution pictures of how that was set up. Sounds like a perfect solution for a 'free stylin'' type of trip.

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I would love to see some close up, higher resolution pictures of how that was set up. Sounds like a perfect solution for a 'free stylin'' type of trip.

The heat shield was the key to this setup.  I'll try to get a photo of said shield.

CargoBike0002.jpg

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Muchas gracias.  That rear foot peg is in a handy spot.  I don't have those.

 

Trooper,

 

Here is the setup on the '03 400.  It has a rack with two 4" x 18" ABS pipe containers for tire irons etc.  This setup overlaps the seat a bit so movement is more limited. The saddle bags are the same and there is a large duffle for sleeping bag, pad, tent, and more. More weight, too.

 

Being prepared to camp out provides freedom and safety.  I also wear a camelback with three liters of water.

Cargo400.jpg

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Yeah that's sweet. A rack would really help. I'm really interested in cargo net only setup. If you have more pictures please share!

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I don't have anymore shots of the bike loaded but here are a couple photos of the heat shield.

 

We rolled into San Felipe at 4;30 P.M. and had the welder braze my threaded lugs onto my muffler.  He also bent and drilled my 8" x 12" x .040" 6061-T6 aluminum shields and chased the lug threads with a tap after brazing.  At my friends place, I rounded and de-burred the aluminum and shortened my bolts on the grinder completing the project.  This is necessary to keep your saddle bags from melting.  An hour in the sandwash and you can hold your hand on the outer shield.  It's close to a hundred degrees F.

 

 

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Heatshield0025.jpg

Heatshieldlmounts0023.jpg

Edited by Baja Rambler

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