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1st North American Magazine Ride Reports NEW WHITE HUSQVARNAS

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How the North American Motorcycle Press is viewing the NEW Husqvarna's:

RIDING THE NEW HUSQVARNAS
(10/9/2013)

HuskyEnduroWeb.JPG

The sheets finally came off the new Husqvarna line in Sweden this week, revealing a line of 10 competition dirt bikes that are bound for the U.S. Since KTM acquired the 110-year-old brand earlier this year, speculation, rumors and scuttlebutt have been rampant. The upper brass at KTM was keeping the info under wraps until the world press could be assembled at the Uddevalla GP track in western Sweden for a big unveiling when outsiders would be permitted to test ride the first Austrian-made Husqvarnas. The line will include both motocross bikes and off-road models powered by two-stroke and four-stroke engines. Additionally an 85cc MX bike will available. At last, some significant questions have been answered. Such as …

Q. Will the new Husqvarnas be just like KTMs?

A. Not exactly, but they will be very similar. Everything in the new Husqvarna line has a blood brother in the KTM line.

Q. Will Husqvarna replace Husaberg in KTM's corporate family?

A. Yes. But not in 2014. The two lines will coexist for a year. The new owners see it as more of a reunification. Back in 1988, when Husky was relocated from Sweden to Italy, some disgruntled Swedes formed their own motorcycle company. That was the origin of Husaberg.

Q. Will the current line of Italian-made Husqvarnas be discontinued?

A. Yes. Say goodbye to the models that were produced in Italy, as soon as the current inventory is gone. These will include some 2014 models. The new owners will be providing parts and customer service for the Italian line for the foreseeable future.
The bottom line is that 2014 will be very confusing, as Husabergs, Italian-made Huskys and Austrian-made Huskys coexist with KTMs. All that will quickly be reduced to KTM and Husky, which will be similar but not identical. Husqvarna will be seen as a high-end line, sold through separate dealers. For 2014, there will be five motocross bikes (85, 125, 250 two-strokes, 250 and a 450 four-strokes), and there will be five off-road bikes (250 and 300 two-strokes, and 250, 350 and 450 four-strokes) in the Husky line.

Motocross%20groupweb.jpg

Riding the new bikes in the area around the Uddevalla GP track revealed that the new Husqvarnas will, indeed, have their own identity. The enduro models, in particular, are unlike anything currently available. They are woods bikes like the KTM XCWs and Husaberg FEs, but they have linkage like the KTM motocrossers. The suspension settings are very cushy, and the forks are the WP 4CS units with the rebound damping in the right leg and the compression in the left. All of the full-size Huskys will have composite subframes that are integrated with the airbox, like the current Husabergs.

The terrain in Sweden is rocky, muddy and unforgiving. The new Huskys, while made in faraway Austria, step into the role of the tough Swede well. It's hard to image bikes that would be more effective in that type of riding.

So are we better off now that Husky and KTM are under the same umbrella? Absolutely. Inevitably, some will say that our choices have been reduced now that Husqvarna has stopped being an independent brand. But that was going to happen anyway. Former parent company BMW had clearly lost interest in Husqvarna, and KTM actually saved the brand by stepping in and taking over. If this had not happened, there would be no more Husqvarna.

We couldn't be happier with the results. The bikes are good, they have their own purpose and if you're a Husqvarna fan, you have a lot to be happy about. Expect the new models to be in North American dealers by December 2013.

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http://www.dirtbikemagazine.com/ME2/dirmod.asp?sid=&nm=&type=news&mod=News&mid=9A02E3B96F2A415ABC72CB5F516B4C10&tier=3&nid=59644DC7DFFD4DE7A6918854DC0CF236

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Yep...HR is losing his mind...He already posting this in another thread.

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All the majors posted stuff up MXA, Dirt Rider, DirtBike on their websites and all the foreign press has it all over MotoVerte, Motociclismo fuoristrada, MotoCross etc etc . Its all a company press release its everywhere.

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All the majors posted stuff up MXA, Dirt Rider, DirtBike on their websites and all the foreign press has it all over MotoVerte, Motociclismo fuoristrada, MotoCross etc etc . Its all a company press release its everywhere.

Robert.... If you read past the second photo you'd have seen that it is an actually 1st ride report and not from the press release, but from the Dirt Bike Magazine reporter who drew the short straw to go to the Uddevalla event in Sweden.

 

QUOTE:

Riding the new bikes in the area around the Uddevalla GP track revealed that the new Husqvarnas will, indeed, have their own identity. The enduro models, in particular, are unlike anything currently available. They are woods bikes like the KTM XCWs and Husaberg FEs, but they have linkage like the KTM motocrossers. The suspension settings are very cushy, and the forks are the WP 4CS units with the rebound damping in the right leg and the compression in the left. All of the full-size Huskys will have composite subframes that are integrated with the airbox, like the current Husabergs.

The terrain in Sweden is rocky, muddy and unforgiving. The new Huskys, while made in faraway Austria, step into the role of the tough Swede well. It's hard to image bikes that would be more effective in that type of riding.

 

So are we better off now that Husky and KTM are under the same umbrella? Absolutely. Inevitably, some will say that our choices have been reduced now that Husqvarna has stopped being an independent brand. But that was going to happen anyway. Former parent company BMW had clearly lost interest in Husqvarna, and KTM actually saved the brand by stepping in and taking over. If this had not happened, there would be no more Husqvarna.

We couldn't be happier with the results. The bikes are good, they have their own purpose and if you're a Husqvarna fan, you have a lot to be happy about. Expect the new models to be in North American dealers by December 2013. 

END QUOTE

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If you look past the white plastic and fancy stickers you will see a KTM.

I don't care what the guy (who was flown to sweden on KTMs dime) says.

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Robert.... If you read past the second photo you'd have seen that it is an actually 1st ride report and not from the press release, but from the Dirt Bike Magazine reporter who drew the short straw to go to the Uddevalla event in Sweden.

 

QUOTE:

Riding the new bikes in the area around the Uddevalla GP track revealed that the new Husqvarnas will, indeed, have their own identity. The enduro models, in particular, are unlike anything currently available. They are woods bikes like the KTM XCWs and Husaberg FEs, but they have linkage like the KTM motocrossers. The suspension settings are very cushy, and the forks are the WP 4CS units with the rebound damping in the right leg and the compression in the left. All of the full-size Huskys will have composite subframes that are integrated with the airbox, like the current Husabergs.

The terrain in Sweden is rocky, muddy and unforgiving. The new Huskys, while made in faraway Austria, step into the role of the tough Swede well. It's hard to image bikes that would be more effective in that type of riding.

 

So are we better off now that Husky and KTM are under the same umbrella? Absolutely. Inevitably, some will say that our choices have been reduced now that Husqvarna has stopped being an independent brand. But that was going to happen anyway. Former parent company BMW had clearly lost interest in Husqvarna, and KTM actually saved the brand by stepping in and taking over. If this had not happened, there would be no more Husqvarna.

We couldn't be happier with the results. The bikes are good, they have their own purpose and if you're a Husqvarna fan, you have a lot to be happy about. Expect the new models to be in North American dealers by December 2013. 

END QUOTE

What/where is a North American Husky dealer?

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If you look past the white plastic and fancy stickers you will see a KTM.

I don't care what the guy (who was flown to sweden on KTMs dime) says.

That my friend was not from the press release, but from a quick first ride impression by a North American Magazine writer... NO it doesn't say much, but he's very positive and optimistic about the NEW Husqvarnas.

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First Test: 2014 Husqvarna Model Lineup

We Ride The New 2014 Husky Two-Strokes and Four-Strokes


By: Chris Denison
Tuesday, October 8, 2013

Along with Husqvarna announcing their 2014 model line came the opportunity for Dirt Rider to swing a leg over each of these new machines at the recent world press launch in Sweden. For a more comprehensive breakdown of these motorcycles, click on the recently posted Husqvarna preview at http://www.dirtrider.com/features/2014-husqvarna-preview/. In a nutshell, though, here’s the skinny: there are ten bikes, five of which are two-strokes and five of which are four-strokes. The lineup is also split right down the middle, 50/50 off-road and motocross. There are obvious ties to KTMs and Husabergs, with the only major difference outside of the colorway and graphics being the polyamide rear subframe made famous by Husaberg. This three-piece, fiberglass-reinforced design offers what Husqvarna feels is the best balance of rigidity and flex, and its inclusion on the TC line marks the first time that a composite subframe has ever been offered on a production motocross bike.
The model range starts with an 85cc mini and extends all the way up to the big 501cc thumper. The TC 85 has a few differences from the larger models and many of the sweeping similarities of the ’14 Husky line do not apply to it. But as far as big bikes go, the other nine Husqvarnas all sport WP suspension on both ends, linkage suspension, single component cast swingarms, black D.I.D. rims, CNC triple clamps with four different handlebar mount positions, and hand guards. Here’s a look at how each of these motorcycles performed out in the dirt:

DRweb_2014_Husky_09.jpg

 

FE 250/ FE 350
With strong torque and great traction, it’s not difficult to get the front wheel off the ground using the FE 350’s throttle.
Keihin electronic fuel injection, DDS/ Brembo clutches, built in radiator fans, and WP’s 4CS fork mark just some of the familiar features on these California green sticker—legal models. On the trail, the light overall weight of the FE250 is apparent. Weight transfer is excellent and the machine feels incredibly flickable on quick direction changes and in S-turns, with no top-heavy or weighty tendencies. When cornering, the front has a tendency to push through tight lines unless extra effort is made to really set up beforehand and arc outward for a less sharp corner entry. As with the other models, the WP4CS fork gave some harsh feedback on chop that was the result of it blowing through the initial part of the stroke and packing in the mid. Out back, the shock felt firm—though not stiff—and held up well.

Power-wise, this bike loves to be revved. The bottom-to-mid-range is soft in comparison to the top, though response is clean and the bike can still be lugged in the right conditions (when weighting the back end, mainly). A gearing swap or a heavier flywheel would help to reduce stalling under hard braking on tight trails, as the stock setup forces the rider to downshift quickly when entering nasty spots in a taller gear. The exhaust note is pleasant even when revving, and the electric start works exceptionally well when the bike is both cold and hot.

Built upon the same platform as the FE 250, the Husqvarna FE 350 also comes equipped with a DOHC engine that boasts titanium valves and DLC-coated finger followers. In contrast to the smaller four-stroke, the 350 has way more torque and does not need to be revved nearly as far. The power is smoother in tight terrain, and given the slick conditions of the intro this was probably my favorite bike out of everything in the off-road lineup. You don’t have to clutch the 350 a ton to make it work; shifting excessively is also not required, as the bike will pull in a variety of gears. The FE 350 is a total traction machine, the transmission is butter, the mid-range is solid, and the top-end doesn’t bang into the rev limiter when you stretch it out a little. Weight-wise, the FE 350 is tad more top-heavy than the FE 250, and it takes an increased amount of effort to get the bike to go where you want. More than once I felt as though I had to really muscle the bike to get it into the right line, though this is a sacrifice made for excellent straight-line stability with no odd deflection from the front tire.

FE 501
DRweb_2014_Husky_01.jpg
The 2014 Husqvarna TE 501 is definitely a powerhouse.

The big 501 is definitely a powerhouse, but it is not as difficult to ride as you may think. Down low, this beast will definitely break traction if you just hammer the throttle, as the initial hit and low-end pull is very strong. I found myself covering the clutch a lot to help modulate the power, and by deliberately weighting the rear tire more than the other bikes it was not hard to keep the bike pulling up loose rock sections and steep gravel hills. As expected, this is the most top-heavy feeling machine of the bunch, and combined with the massive snap that the engine produces it’s possible to get out of shape if you’re not careful or paying attention. Still, I was surprised by how well the 501 worked in tight sections; the relatively weighty feel (which, in reality, is similar to a KTM 500) goes away when you are flowing and carrying speed. Only when you mess up and get out of shape does the bike feel scary. A stiffer fork setting (clicker adjustment) helped the bike overall but wasn’t as plush over repeated hits and head-on impacts such as logs and tree roots. The shock did a fine job of absorbing without any unwanted kicks or hits.

 

TE 250/ TE 300
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Both the Husqvarna TE 250 and TE 300 are capable and well-rounded off-road platforms.

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Flickable two-stroke platforms are a hoot to ride off-road. The Husqvarna TE 300 demonstrates.

Also equipped with the WP 4CS closed-cartridge fork, the TE 250 and TE 300 two-strokes are built around the now-closed Husaberg production line. A DDS (damped diaphragm steel)/ Brembo hydraulic clutch also graces each machine, along with electric starting with a kickstart backup. Each transmission is a six-speed design, and both machines are tunable via adjustable power valves as well as through two different pre-set ignition curves that can be changed by simply switching a plug connection. Both bikes are also capable, durable, and totally at home in difficult terrain. The TE250 works just as well in nasty sections as its bigger brother. Even though the 300’s extra torque seemed to be the hot setup on the slick trails, the power on both bikes is strong throughout and does not wear the rider out or spin the tire excessively. The clutch works great, shifting is smooth and the electric start is flawless. A lack of damping support on drop offs and hard hits had us chasing the suspension to a stiffer clicker setting on both bikes. The shock worked well overall. The ergonomics are comfortable, and aside from a stiff seat there’s not really anything to complain about when riding in the attack position.

FC 250/ FC 450
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If you’ve ridden a KTM 250 SX-F before, you’ll feel right at home aboard the Husky FC 250

DRweb_2014_Husky_06.jpg
Husqvarna’s new MX four-strokes are a big step up from recent Husky motocross thumpers.

Based off of the KTM SX-F models, the new Husqvarna four-stroke MXers are certainly proven. Neither bike has kickstart casting—it’s button start only—with Dunlop, Renthal, and Brembo sitting near the top of the Husqvarna’s accessory list. Not surprisingly, both machines’ on-track performance reflects that of their orange counterparts: The FC 250 has a broad powerband that hooked up well on the slippery circuit. I felt at home aboard the machine right away, and I didn’t notice any hiccups in tuning nor when shifting. The bike could stand to have a stronger bottom-end, although the rev-to-the-moon personality of the top end provides enough excitement for the average pilot. The FC 250 seemed to reward aggressive riding, which would mask the slightly harsh character of the suspension when ridden slowly or through repeated hits and rough ruts. Tracking was decent in corners, and I found that I could cut inside of lines if I set up properly and had faith in the front tire’s shoulder knobs to hook up. The FC 450 took more effort and energy to corner, due to a higher resistance to leaning than the smaller machine. As expected, the larger four-stroke revved out quite hard and could clear bigger jumps from the inside line with amazing ease. Hard hits pushed the fork to the limit, and more tuning than we had time for would be required to really dial in the setting for the track we were riding. Still, this was the best “Husqvarna” 450cc four-stroke I have ever ridden, and the heavily KTM-influenced Austrian machine is leaps and bounds better than the old Husqvarna 449.

TC 125/ TC 250
DRweb_2014_Husky_07.jpg
Two-strokes are a blast, and both the Husky TC 125 and TC 250 will put a smile on your face.

Based off of KTM’s 125 and 250 SX models, the new Husky TC 125 and 250 both provide two-stroke lovers with a unique MX-oriented solution. The 125 powerplant features a Vertex piston with a Magura clutch and comes stock with Boyesen reed valves, Dunlop MX51 tires, a Renthal Fatbar and WP’s closed-cartridge fork. The 250 shares several of these components but instead is offered with a five-speed transmission and a DDS/ Brembo hydraulic clutch setup. For those who want a bit more boost, there is a 300cc kit available through Husky Power. Both machines feature easy tuning by way of the same power valve and ignition curve options found on the TE 250 and 300.

I felt that these motorcycles were fun, but I’ll admit that the slick track conditions in Sweden were better suited to the traction-grabbing thumpers. The 125cc was a blast to ride and rev out; the small-bore engine produced a healthy snap and sounded crisp and clean. You have to shift this little machine a ton, and you definitely need to be active with the clutch to keep the revs in the right place. Given the additional weight of the accumulated mud added to the underside of the fenders, the TC 125’s suspension felt soft on hard landings, in whoops, and even when coming into corners. A loose steering feel makes the bike feel flickable and also unstable. On the bigger end, the TC 250 has such a sharp hit down low that it broke loose just about every time the throttle was cracked open—I actually added some slack to the throttle cable just to help mellow out the initial response feel. The 250cc engine has a fat mid-range and revs out quickly while still allowing itself to be ridden on the pipe. I felt as though the TC 250 absorbed harder hits better than the 125, but a semi-sharp bite of the suspension on square-edged bumps kept me on my toes—both literally and figuratively—when negotiating choppy terrain.

Conclusion
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Husqvarna has taken some huge strides in a short amount of time.

Some Husqvarna fans were truly expecting an all-new lineup of motorcycles for 2014. While this would have been radical, it’s really not very realistic—the powers that be at KTM have only owned Husqvarna for around seven months. It makes sense that the new Husky line would borrow so heavily from its sister brand, and we can definitely hope that in the future additional updates and innovations become available to further separate the two brands (notice that I didn’t say “three”; that’s because Husaberg has already halted production, and once the current bikes are sold there will be no more ‘Bergs produced). As it stands now, Husqvarna has a complete collection of MX and off-road models that is proven to be reliable, is already an increase in performance over their previous models, and that hits on both two- and four-stroke owners. The biggest downside at this point is that Husky is considered a “premium” brand, so prices are not likely to drop—the days of the cheap, street-legal Husqvarna are officially over. But if the brand keeps charging as hard as it has in the past few months, there’s no telling what they’ll be able to accomplish in the coming years.

http://www.dirtrider.com/features/first-test-2014-husqvarna-model-lineup/

Read more: http://www.dirtrider.com/features/first-test-2014-husqvarna-model-lineup/#ixzz2hG1r2xRf

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Don't expect them to be in the US December though, expect your Husqberg in the spring....

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Tested BY ENDURO21.COM- 2014 Husqvarna TE 250

97aac835489da277e8dd12c494d3dea5_L.jpg

The 2014 Husqvarna TE 250 ridden and rated...
Ridden and rated, Enduro21.com rides the all-new 2014 Husqvarna TE 250…


Tester: Llel Pavey

The rebirth of Husqvarna is an exciting prospect. With the brand taken back to its Swedish roots for the launch of the 2014 model range, and with the might of KTM behind it, the yellow and blue of Sweden could soon return to its heyday. Husqvarna fans can now look forward to the addition of a top-level two-stroke line-up - something that has been missing for a long time. The TE 250 is the pride of the two-stroke range - here's the lowdown...

1. Styling

Based on the Husaberg styling, Husqvarna’s design team have gone a little old school. Referring back to Husqvarna ‘classics’ such as Thomas Gustavsson’s 1983 ISDE bike, the yesteryear influence is clear to see. White frame and plastics, coupled with flashes of Swedish blue and yellow make for a gorgeous and striking combination.

husqvarna_4CM2840-1080-web.jpg


2. Linkage

For many the linkage is the most interesting point of the bike, and range. While PDS has divided opinion among KTM owners, using a linkage system on the new Husqvarnas now gives riders the option of orange and no linkage, or white with a linkage. The reason Husky's now feature a linkage is twofold - to attract the PDS detractors while also targeting the North American market. It also allows another element of adjustability through different linkage ratios.

While some people feel linkages are vulnerable to damage, it doesn’t appear to be the case. Despite the brutal Swedish rocks scattered around the test track, the linkage neveronce came into contact with anything. To ride, the bike sits lower on the rear and feels more predictable than PDS. It’s more consistent, confidence inspiring and seems to deal better with unexpected hits.

husqvarna_4CM2606-1080-web.jpg

3. Braking

Brembo systems are top notch and the Husky brakes don’t disappoint. The wheels feature billet aluminium hubs laced to black anodized DID rims while Michelin Comp IV (front) and Comp III (rear) provide the rubber. The gearing on the TE 250 is the same as the Husaberg predecessor with 14/50 standard and an optional 13 tooth included.

husqvarna_4CM2518-1080-web.jpg


4. Cockpit

The Husqvarna retains all the same controls and switchgear from the Husaberg. That means the Brembo hydraulic clutch, electric start buttons and lighting switches are carried over. The TE 250 doesn’t come with an optional CDI map switch, but one is available from the Husqvarna Power Parts catalogue. The controls on the Husqvarna are, as you would expect, very good. The clutch is light and the buttons all do the jobs for which they are intended. The clear fuel tank means it’s easy to gauge fuel level.

TE_Handlebar-1080-web.jpg

5. Engine

Whilst the engine remains the same as the ’14 Husabergs - including the change from Vforce to Boyeson reed block - the standard jetting is different. The Husky also comes fitted with a plastic sump guard as standard and has both an electric starter and a kick start.

The engine gave smooth and easily managed bottom end and pulled strongly towards the top-end. The mid-range felt stronger than this engine has in the past too. It was incredibly easy to ride and was jetted far better than the most recent batch of Husaberg’s.

husqvarna_4CM2813-1080-web.jpg

6. Suspension

The Husqvarna forks are WP’s newest creation - the 4CS that has graced KTM’s Six Day’s editions and the Husaberg range. The four-cartridge system has compression on the left fork and rebound on the right with easy adjust dials. The rebound dial is also red, so it’s easier to remember. The rear shock is the WP DDS, fully adjustable shock that comes on the motocross models so it’s specifically designed for the linkage.

The linkage and rear shock has added an element of stability to the Husqvarna that the Husaberg had lost. The forks ride well on the slippery roots and rocks of the Swedish forest, allowing us to ride with confidence in difficult situations. At times they felt a little ‘dead’ but the ability to change rebound and compression on the fly is a nice touch. The forks were more responsive to clicker changes than they were previously.

husqvarna_4CM2610-1080-web.jpg


7. Ride Impression

Hopping onto the TE 250, it won’t feel all that different to owners of Husaberg & KTM. The biggest difference is that the rear end feels more squatted and neutral than previously.

The chassis with the linkage combo is great to ride - it feels more predictable and doesn’t ever feel wild. Because the bike sits a little lower at the back, it is more neutral and unlike the Husaberg. You might expect this to affect the cornering of the bike but it doesn’t.

Regarding general suspension performance, the setup felt quite soft. The forks were very good over the slippery rocks and roots of the test track, however the terrain on offer was quite technical making it difficult to guage its performance at higher speeds. Even in the slower going it has a tendency to use a large portion of the travel without much encouragement.

The carburation and power delivery were superb. The engine has smooth gentle power right from tick over, making it easy to make forward progress even in the slipperiest of conditions. When you give it some gas, the Husqvarna engine feels stronger than it’s Husaberg base, which is impressive.

Husqvarna-MY14-Launch-0002-1080-web.jpg

The new Husqvarna TE 250 is without doubt one of the best enduro bikes in production today. A bold statement we know, but it really is hard to fault any area of the bike. With over one-hour of riding time spent on the TE 250, clambering in and around wet, moss covered rocks and muddy, Swedish tracks, the Husky showed where it excels best - the harder the riding gets, the more the bike’s ability shines through.

The only reservation we had was the performance of the fork, and how well it will hold up to faster riding. But it’s surprising how a few, small refinements have produced a bike that is noticeably different to a Husaberg.

Husqvarna have set out to deliver as high a quality product as possible, and they've done a smart job. It’s a serious woods weapon that is far enough removed from its Austrian cousin to not be considered ‘just’ a white KTM.

Two-stroke lovers, put this bike on your shopping list…

- AS TESTED BY ENDURO 21: http://www.enduro21.com/index.php/component/k2/item/1357-test-2014-husqvarna-te-250

- See more at: http://www.enduro21.com/index.php/component/k2/item/1357-test-2014-husqvarna-te-250#sthash.akiW2noK.dpuf

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Its a white KTM

Dude... You do know that Husqvana AB (in Sweden and the owners of the HUSQVARNA NAME) pushed BMW into selling the Husqvarna Motorcycle brand to SP and KTM AG.

 

Husqvarna AB was tired of all the Italian BS and didn't want Husqvarna Motorcycles to fall back into the hands of MV Agusta or one of the smaller motorcycle brands like Beta or GasGas.

 

You can bitch all you want, but Husqvarna AB wanted this deal to happen and SP and KTM AG are the owners of Husqvarna Motorcycles now.

 

It's over and the NEW WHITE Husqvarnas are light years better than the 2007-2013 Italian BMW/Husqvarna's.  :moon:

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Dude... You do know that Husqvana AB (in Sweden and the owners of the HUSQVARNA NAME) pushed BMW into selling the Husqvarna Motorcycle brand to SP and KTM AG.

 

Husqvarna AB was tired of all the Italian BS and didn't want Husqvarna Motorcycles to fall back into the hands of MV Agusta or one of the smaller motorcycle brands like Beta or GasGas.

 

You can bitch all you want, but Husqvarna AB wanted this deal to happen and SP and KTM AG are the owners of Husqvarna Motorcycles now.

 

It's over and the NEW WHITE Husqvarnas are light years better than the 2007-2013 Italian BMW/Husqvarna's.  :moon:

Doesn't change the fact its a white KTM.  The Husqvarna name could have disappeared forever for all I care. I'll just buy something else and whatever it is it won't be built by KTM.

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Doesn't change the fact its a white KTM.  The Husqvarna name could have disappeared forever for all I care. I'll just buy something else and whatever it is it won't be built by KTM.

That's OK....there's already more interest in the NEW WHITE HUSQVARNA'S than in the last six years under BMW ownership.

 

I see a whole new crop of Husqvarna Sportcycles fanatics... and in a year from now the Italian BMW/Husqvarnas will be all but forgotten.

Edited by HuskyRips

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Think I'll set out on the new Huskabergs and give them a few years to see if they can end up different from the KTM's.  I like my 08 Husky CR 125(165 now) it turns like a dream and it's not sketchy at speed.  I'll also take my slow 2010 Husky TC 250 over the new KTM/Huskaberg for now.  I like bikes that turn without lots of effort and are stable at speed.  For ME the old Huskys I have do both.  The new bikes first ride reports sound like KTM ride reports to me and a reason to give the new deal some time.  Not bashing or bitching just MHO. 

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Think I'll set out on the new Huskabergs and give them a few years to see if they can end up different from the KTM's.  I like my 08 Husky CR 125(165 now) it turns like a dream and it's not sketchy at speed.  I'll also take my slow 2010 Husky TC 250 over the new KTM/Huskaberg for now.  I like bikes that turn without lots of effort and are stable at speed.  For ME the old Huskys I have do both.  The new bikes first ride reports sound like KTM ride reports to me and a reason to give the new deal some time.  Not bashing or bitching just MHO. 

John, I love my Italian built TE450 and I plan on keeping it for a very long time (for street legal trail riding)... it's a nice handling bike and super reliable.

 

On the NEW WHITE Husqvarna apparently the press is saying that the link makes a huge difference on how the bike feels in the woods compared to the PDS Husaberg and KTM... They even go as far as saying that this might be the best 2-stroke out there.

 

I think I'm going to give it a try when they're available in December. 

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I'm in the market for a new bike now so I really don't want to wait very long so I "think" I'll gamble on the new Sherco for now. We have about 75 members in a club here in VA and lots of them race so maybe I'll get a test ride on one once they are here. The new Huskys sure do look good though. I did read over on CH that one member that has a KTM 350 said it "doesn't feel top heavy nor is it hard to turn".

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