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Bought the Gary Semics DVD's

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I am currently watching VOL 2 DVD 'all about jumps and whoops' and I had a question.  I see that Gary says to land front wheel first on the landing of most jumps, however he doesn't really explain how to ensure that happens.  He said to put your butt out on the rebound but is the amount you throw your butt out proportional to how much the front tire goes up or down?  

 

I'm more interested in learning how to move the bike around without having to rely on the back brake and throttle, reserving those for more emergency type situations.  

 

Also, conversely, if I want to land rear wheel first how do I ensure that?  Currently on most table tops I'm landing on both wheels which gary says is bad.. then again I'm not clearing them yet, I'm landing on the table portion and am not landing on the gas.  It's a pretty hard hit, I'm just working my way up to landing on the gas without fear of whiskey throttle.

 

Thanks for your time

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You can typically get the front wheel to come UP by body motions/position, but getting it to come down, in a timely fashion, is much more difficult, and typically is out of control, or off balanced. Use your rear brakes if you need To srop the front.

However, i don't usually land on the front tire first, i like to land even or on the rear wheel first. On flat landings, i like to land rear wheel first, or flat, on long not-too steep landings, i like to land rear-wheel first, to put the power to the ground instantly. But on super steep, or supercross style landings, you have to land front wheel first, only way to land it properly. As you get more confident in your skills, you'll find your own style. But knowing how to land front wheel first is invaluable, and Gary teaches that quite well.

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The most important part of the jump is where the bike actually leaves the ground, where you have the compression and rebound part of the jump.  What gives you control at this critical part of the jump is your body movements and throttle control.  Along with this body movement and throttle control is timing.  The timing is so critical that the body movement and throttle control has to be an automatic reflex reaction.  This is why it takes so much time and practice to learn to jump well.   Key into the compressing and rebound part of the jump, move your body back a little as the rear wheel kicks up and blip the throttle a little at the same time.  This will cause the front wheel to stay level or come up a little.  If the front wheel is too high don’t move back as much or give it as much throttle.  If you want the front end lower it’s just the opposite; don’t blip the throttle as much and don’t move back as much.  When you want to accelerate after the landing it’s best to land with the throttle on. 

 

This info is in that video, maybe you just missed it. Anyway, I hope this helps. 

GS

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Gary,

Would sitting farther back, or like neutral, on the seat when seat bouncing make the front end come higher or lower? If you sit farther forward would that make the front end drop at all? There is a great deal of argument about this where i ride and I would like a professionals opinion.

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Gary,

Would sitting farther back, or like neutral, on the seat when seat bouncing make the front end come higher or lower? If you sit farther forward would that make the front end drop at all? There is a great deal of argument about this where i ride and I would like a professionals opinion.

Where you sit on the seat doesn't make nearly as much difference as how you time the clutch and throttle and how much you jerk back on the handlebars, also at the right time. Timing is critical. 

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Where you sit on the seat doesn't make nearly as much difference as how you time the clutch and throttle and how much you jerk back on the handlebars, also at the right time. Timing is critical.

Gary, I've got most of your DVD's and they've helped me a lot. But, your DVD MX Cornering Speed Beyond the Basics made a huge improvement for me. I watched it dozens of times and picked up a lot of things. It's easily cut my lap times a few seconds a lap. Made a huge improvement with cornering in deep ruts, and saving energy too. Now deep ruts don't bother me at all. That's where I can make make up a lot of time.

If any of you struggle with your cornering, and ruts. Get this DVD and study it, and watch it many times. It will help you.

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Gary, I've got most of your DVD's and they've helped me a lot. But, your DVD MX Cornering Speed Beyond the Basics made a huge improvement for me. I watched it dozens of times and picked up a lot of things. It's easily cut my lap times a few seconds a lap. Made a huge improvement with cornering in deep ruts, and saving energy too. Now deep ruts don't bother me at all. That's where I can make make up a lot of time.

If any of you struggle with your cornering, and ruts. Get this DVD and study it, and watch it many times. It will help you.

Hey j368, It's feedback like this that keeps me motivated doing what I do. Thanks very much for the post. 

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