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Yz250 fork height recommendation

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I'm about to put my forks that I just had new seals put in tomorrow morning and was wondering what height you guys would reccomend putting them at. The bike is an 06 and I race fast harescrambles on it (rarely any moto). I guess I mainly want to hear recommendations to make the bike turn a little better mainly in the woods...also sag height would be helpful too. Ive usually ran them at the machined line right at the top of the clamp. Thanx in advance guys.

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Thanx for the reply but I usually run it right at that line...I was wondering if anyone has ran them higher for better steering

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I run mine just slightly higher that the first line, maybe 4mm or so.  My sag is set at about 105mm as well.  Just raced it yesterday with this setup.  I handled well did exactly what I wanted it to.  I didn't like mine right at the line as I felt it could have turned better....now it does.  Didn't loose stability either

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I think I'm gonna put the machined line about 4mm above the top of the clamp on mine. I believe that's what azmatt was trying to say. Also I could be wrong but I'm pretty sure that the 08 and newer yzs got 4mm shorter forks...and I'm sure prob did that for some handling purpose so I'll try that and then set the sag 105 or lower and see how it does..

By the way I'm dissapointed that I can't even get 5 replies when I'm really only asking preference and experience when just last week a dude got 350+ replies only to find out that the problem was his clutch was slipping...Lol j/p guys

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I run mine just slightly higher that the first line, maybe 4mm or so.  My sag is set at about 105mm as well.  Just raced it yesterday with this setup.  I handled well did exactly what I wanted it to.  I didn't like mine right at the line as I felt it could have turned better....now it does.  Didn't loose stability either

That's the key if anyone wants to experiment with the fork location...Loss of stability.  Proper spring rate is involved too.  If you have too weak of spring in the rear and a lot of sag, that screws up the forks/front end "angle of attack".  Not the correct term but I think you know what I mean.  So, there's about 50 things involved in the whole problem of finding the correct position like riding style, type of riding - (MX/woods), surface conditions, tire age......  Bottom line - Raise them up too far and you'll lose high speed stability and possibly the front will want to tuck in too far & fast on certain surfaces.  Down too far and stability will be good but not want to turn in without fighting you - (Good for desert!)  But it will want to go OVER the berm instead of turning.

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Actually, I have mine at 12 mm. up and I can tell the turn-in is improved.  I haven't noticed any degradation of high-speed stability but probably someone faster than me, and on rougher terrain likely will notice it.

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MOTOXVET nailed it. You should adjust them depending on how you want the front end to react.

 

It also depends on if you have the suspension set up correctly for your weight. If your suspension isn't balanced and you run the forks past the stock line you will have issues with BAD head shake in small bumps and while braking hard. I have mine set at 3mm below the line and I'm really happy with it. 

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Right I understand that definitely makes sense. My bike is sprung for my weight however the valving is unknown...all I know is they are gold valves. I've seen them apart but don't know what I'm looking at when it comes to shim stacks. The guy I bought it off of raced desert races at a pro level tho. -_- so I'm not sure how far off the valving would be. I race harsscrambles at a decent b level and would just like it turn a little better in the tight stuff and sharp turns. The bike seems like it could lose a little stability with worrying me at all.

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By the way I'm dissapointed that I can't even get 5 replies when I'm really only asking preference and experience when just last week a dude got 350+ replies only to find out that the problem was his clutch was slipping...Lol j/p guys

 

 

We're burned out!!!! That post went on & on & on & on & on & on & on & on.............................................................you get the point!!!!

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We're burned out!!!! That post went on & on & on & on & on & on & on & on.............................................................you get the point!!!!

Lmfao!! I get it man i was too lol.....I have the thumper talk app on my phone and it sounds like a text message when someone replies to a topic that u subscribed too.........needless to say I unsubscribed after like the first 150 posts

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OK well thanx for all the replies i think I'm either gonna run it at 4mm below the line or 5

I would Suggest running it on the 5mm line to start with. 

Dial your sag in on that setting for turn-in only.

If the bike pushes coming out of the turns, give it a few clicks of rebound on the forks.

When you find the sweet spot in your sag, write that number down and mark the adjuster ring (keep track of turns and sag measurements).

Then keep going past that sweet spot at least 5mm so you can feel the entire range of available setting (from lazy through sharp) at 5mm on the forks.

(FYI: it's about 3mm sag change per turn of the preload ring).

Set the bike up on your sag sweet spot again and then start playing with the fork height in 2mm increments.

Run 7mm and do some laps.  Run 9mm and do some laps, etc.   When you get headshake, back it off 1mm at a time until it feels safe in the worst braking bumps you can find.

If you set it up in this way, you aren't compensating for a less than optimum sag setting with fork height, etc. 

You'll get the ride height and linkage closest to their design-optimum.

I went 4 years without riding and across that gap went from a CR250R to a YZ.  I had to re-learn to ride, and it took me a while to learn that the YZ requires you to be more active.

If you're less than 6 foot tall, to make a YZ turn you need to get up on the tank, put that leg forward and weight the fork.  If the crotch of your pants isn't at least on the front edge of your seat, you aren't doing it right.

I think a taller rider may have enough body weight and a long enough leg to sit a few inches farther back and still have the ability to lean forward and get the front end to hook.

My personal experience / opinion is that 5mm is a very neutral setting with the right spring and sag setting, it works very well on a good range of terrain.

For example, when railing a very fast corner (4th gear berms, etc) I still get a little hunting (slow back and forth of the front fender to compensate terrain) but no headshake issues when the sag is right.

I rarely have to change my front end away from 5mm unless it's an oddball deal like Arenacross or just experimenting.

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