Float repair?

I've got a small (really small) hole in one of my floats.

 

Anyone know of a fuel resistant sealer that they have personal experience with that will actually hold up for some time? I just need to dab a bit on the float to plug the hole, but I don't want it to come loose and end up plugging my pilot circuit.

 

Anyone have any suggestions?

Guess I should have Googled it first.

 

A fifteen second search returned this... http://eclecticproducts.com/sealall.htm

 

I'm gonna find out who has it locally and go pick some up. I'll report back on whether or not it works. I figure I'd rather spend five bucks on a tube of this stuff and see if it works before I blow sixty bucks on a new float set.That's good beer money.

 

I've used it & was amazed, so far its holding fuel. pin hole in metal tank.

Huh, I didn't know the foam floats could actually spring a leak.

Huh, I didn't know the foam floats could actually spring a leak.

 

Dammit! They're foam?

 

I just assumed (I know, I know) that they were hollow plastic units that would fill up and cause running problems. No?

 

The bike is running fine, I just thought I'd check my float height 'cause the float bowl is overflowing. I measured the height at 14mm, but my Clymer specs the float height at 18mm, so I tweaked the tang a bit, then I went back to the garage and adjusted the height to spec. Edited to add that I read the wrong year in my manual, 14mm is correct.

 

So is the float abrasion a non-issue?

 

I'll go grab my camera, pics to follow.

Edited by sploogemonkey

I'm pretty sure that the floats are solid foam like Nitrophyl blower floats for Holley carbs and they don't really break down or become saturated with fuel that I know of. I have even seen good floats that appeared to have some surface porosity. I suppose it's possible though; these bikes are getting old enough now for us to see age-related parts failures that were previously uncommon.

 

In my observations, overflowing carbs are mostly caused by a leaking float valve.

I'm pretty sure that the floats are solid foam like Nitrophyl blower floats for Holley carbs and they don't really break down or become saturated with fuel that I know of. I have even seen good floats that appeared to have some surface porosity. I suppose it's possible though; these bikes are getting old enough now for us to see age-related parts failures that were previously uncommon.

 

In my observations, overflowing carbs are mostly caused by a leaking float valve.

 

 

Yup, I figured the float valve might have some crud in it, which is why I pulled the carb, however everything was clean inside. Since I left the cables attached to the carb, I had it resting on the seat frame rails, and when I turned around to grab a screwdriver I heard a "thunk". I turned to see my carb resting against the front rotor hanging from the cables. The impact dinged one of the floats pretty good.

 

Anyway, after you mentioned the foam thingy, I decided to take a file to the float and smooth out the imperfection. One benefit is that if I ever sell the bike I can count the custom hand contoured, weight saving float modification that smooths out the fuel delivery do to the radiused reshaping of the float.

 

Here's a pic of my high speed, low drag float mod.

 

DSCN2654_zpsb07d96da.jpg

 

 

And my pig ready for the trail again.

 

DSCN2658_zps2052d600.jpg

Ummmm, that's a clean and sweet looking pig.  I've got XR envy.

Thank you sir. I'm down to my last two bikes after several years and many different motorcycles. My pig and my street bike will probably be the last I own, so I tend to dote over them a bit. What I need to do is find more time to ride.

I was noticing your sig line, that's quite a collection there. I'm guessing that Remington insurance is probably policy number 870!

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