New racer Questions

i have been digging and digging and cannot find my bike regulations for district 23 in mn i want to start racing next season and get my bike ready this winter but cant find the restrictions on what can be done to the bike... can anyone let me know ill be in a class "c" or "b" 250 class

It usually comes down to what you want to do. Local races are looser and you can usually get away with basic mods. The district should have a regulations page. Check it out.

Leave your bike stock. Get the suspension done for your weight.

Buy the correct gear. Spend your time and effort on practice.

Your bike stock is way faster than you are.

Thanks guys ill look deeper into the rulebook. Do i need to send my suspension to someone or can it be done locally?

Thanks guys ill look deeper into the rulebook. Do i need to send my suspension to someone or can it be done locally?

A little add to William1's post, just install the correct springs and set the sag, your suspension is probably faster than you as well. In stock form, sprung correctly modern suspension is fine for c or b class riders. Your best money spent will be on springs and a manual.

A little add to William1's post, just install the correct springs and set the sag, your suspension is probably faster than you as well. In stock form, sprung correctly modern suspension is fine for c or b class riders. Your best money spent will be on springs and a manual.

Are you talking about a service manual? And there is only the rear shock correct?

Yes on the service manual. Fork springs and a shock spring, learn how to measure sag, it is posted someplace on TT for sure. Then adjust it for you, it's easy.

Got a brand of shocks preferred?

Got a brand of shocks preferred?

What bike do you ride?  If you have a yamaha those forks are very good & springs for your weight & proper adjustment of sag, clickers goes a very long way.  As for brand springs, race tech is good stuff & affordable.  If you have someone do your revalve, make sure they are good & you know what you want out of your suspension or they can really make it worse.  Do not talk faster than you really are or the forks will be terrible unless you are hauling the mail.  When setting the sag, sit where you realistically would sit, if you sit too far up but don't actually get your nuts that far up when riding it will be off.  Being very honest with your ability is what will get a bike set up right

Leave your bike stock. Get the suspension done for your weight.

Buy the correct gear. Spend your time and effort on practice.

Your bike stock is way faster than you are.

 

I agree and I disagree.. mostly agree.  C or a B riders can't outride a stock bike, until the top of the B class then the mods will begin to enhance the rider's ability to race.  That was my experience before jumping up from the B class.

You may not be able to outride the bike, but certain mods will aid in making it easier to ride. Different pipes change the power curve, sprocket combinations change the delivery, good tires aid in traction, good suspension aims in traction, comfort, and ride ability. Plus it may save you in a rough situation. Good gear will protect you from injury. The list goes on. I say get your feet wet and just try to ride first. Then add the mods as the season goes on.

I am newer to bikes but been riding.a yfz450 for years i can jump 80 footers but not consistant i need to learn to corner better and my bikes an 06 kx250f

It takes time and practice. When I was in the 80 class, and C class I was usually the only one hitting the big jumps. That was a great advantage since I couldn't corner for anything. When I was in the B class it still helped but there were others doing the big jumps too, so I needed to learn corners to make up for lost time. Then in the A class everyone did the jumps, and it had no choice but to become good in corners.

Just remember: Jump for show, corner for dough!!!

Now I just ride for fun. Jumps are harder now that I'm older and more aware of the consequences. But you will learn to "feel" it when coming up to a jump.

It takes time and practice. When I was in the 80 class, and C class I was usually the only one hitting the big jumps. That was a great advantage since I couldn't corner for anything. When I was in the B class it still helped but there were others doing the big jumps too, so I needed to learn corners to make up for lost time. Then in the A class everyone did the jumps, and it had no choice but to become good in corners.

Just remember: Jump for show, corner for dough!!!

Now I just ride for fun. Jumps are harder now that I'm older and more aware of the consequences. But you will learn to "feel" it when coming up to a jump.

 

I'm right there with you.. don't do anything out of your comfort zone unless you "feel it." 

I'm not going to start to argue with anyone about the suspension, but do want to add my opinion in here. I'm 5'10 and 105 lbs. On my old 06 YZ 125, we had the correct springs installed and set the sag. I spent over a half a season trying to get the bike to feel rideable, it just wasn't. Even at a few big races FC tried to help out. They couldn't seem to get it any better.

 

Bottom line was with the light springs my bike handled really bad. After talking to a few members on here who have done the same to their big bikes with lighter springs have said the same. They never got it to handle good until the rider gained weight and they put heavier springs in.

 

I'm now on a bone stock 13 yz250f. At first the suspension was harsh on landings as expected, but after break in IT'S REALLY GOOD. Bes I've ever had a bike feel. The guy who does some of my motor/suspension work was going to take a little oil out of my fork because I'm not using all of my travel but I won't let him. I've literally never felt so safe and comfortable on a bike.

 

Now I'm not saying springs aren't he right thing to do, but my "correct springs" were just a nightmare.

ok well im gonna set the sag and hit the track see how it feels before i replace springs and ill go from there

Ride the D class.  Most of the time its a open class and there arent any restrictions to what you can run.

Leave your bike stock. Get the suspension done for your weight.

Buy the correct gear. Spend your time and effort on practice.

Your bike stock is way faster than you are.

No other advice will be better than this. Ask the locals who does their suspension, get it set up properly and practice. That is all you will need for this year, and probably next.

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