Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

KTM "keep tightening me" cheap bolts

Recommended Posts

Bought a 2012 ktm 250xc and I donno if it's just mine or what but had it for 6 months and so far my shifter, kickstarter, muffler , clutch cover cylinder head bolts have all come loose, and the worst part is when I tighten them "to torque specs" they either strip the inner threads or snap completely, 3 cylinder head bolts are stripped beyond repair had to replace kickstart and shifter shafts due to snapped bolts inside them and also have stripped clutch cover and snapped exhaust bolts, huge piss off. Doesn't take much torque to do this damage either. I was wondering if anyone else has these problems with ktm or if I just got a dud

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dont rely so much on a torque wrench. Use thread lock and ride happily ever after.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a torque wrench on everything . I never lose or strip any bolts.

Are you converting from NM to ft.lbs or in.lbs..?  If you are not then it is no wonder you are breaking / stripping bolts. For an example; The head bolts are 27 NM. or 19.91 ft.lbs. If you torque them to 27 ft.lbs. you will strip them.

I used the manual for my 2006 250sx and my 2007 85sx to put this spec sheet together. You can see that I converted everything to ft.lbs and in.lbs. to make it easy for me to use my 3/8" torque wrench on the bigger bolts and my 1/4" torque wrench on the smaller bolts.

 

TorqueSpecs.png

Edited by Larry63r
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No like I am barely even giving it any torque at all like in talking one hand and they either snap or strip on the small bolts (cylinder head I use torque wrench and still takes les than spec to snap them) I know I'm not over torqueing for sure. Q

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i have yet to bring out a torque wrench to re-tighten any bolts on my 250sx.

 

if you are breaking bolts or stripping threads, IMO you need to look at your torque wrench...

 

1 or 2 bolts, ok, with the amount of bolts you've broken/stripped there is a different issue.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only bolts I've had to re-tourque are the upper and lower triple and the axle pinch bolts on the bottom of the fork. Pinch bolts every 5 hours or so and the triples seem to need it every third ride or so. They are around 12 ft lbs so it makes sense to me.

Stripping and breaking bolts is no good, hate to say it but it's likely operator error.

Edited by poldies4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a torque wrench on everything . I never lose or strip any bolts.

Are you converting from NM to ft.lbs or in.lbs..?  If you are not then it is no wonder you are breaking / stripping bolts. For an example; The head bolts are 27 NM. or 19.91 ft.lbs. If you torque them to 27 ft.lbs. you will strip them.

I used the manual for my 2006 250sx and my 2007 85sx to put this spec sheet together. You can see that I converted everything to ft.lbs and in.lbs. to make it easy for me to use my 3/8" torque wrench on the bigger bolts and my 1/4" torque wrench on the smaller bolts.

 

TorqueSpecs.png

 

A useful chart. I would recommend using more digits in the conversion factor so that the conversion is more accurate, though. The conversions are off by no more than a few 100ths of a ft lb so the effect in real life use is nil but, because the table precision is to 100ths the numbers should be accurate to 100ths.  It is the engineer in me talking.  I have a similar chart of my own that I use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No like I am barely even giving it any torque at all like in talking one hand and they either snap or strip on the small bolts (cylinder head I use torque wrench and still takes les than spec to snap them) I know I'm not over torqueing for sure. Q

 

You didn't mention if you were lubing the threads with anything. That can have a profound effect. There is another thread I think here someplace about using less torque when threads are lubed vs dry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have yet to strip ANY bolt in any of the KTMs I've owned so far (but I did read beforehand to never use the oil level check bolt on the 250s lol) but as you said y used to have some of them come loose, now I just put medium locktite on them and the problem is over. 

The subframe to frame bolts, electrical components to frame bolts and kickstarter bolts are locktited even before the first ride now.

 

No like I am barely even giving it any torque at all like in talking one hand and they either snap or strip on the small bolts (cylinder head I use torque wrench and still takes les than spec to snap them) I know I'm not over torqueing for sure. Q

You definitely need to have that torque wrench calibrated.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had several problems with SEIZED bolts directly from the factory from KTM.  

 

Have yet to have any snap though .. but the quality of these bikes (something people used to rave about) "seems" to be deteriorating :smashpc: .  I still like to call it the Bajaj effect  :lol:.  The design of many is very poor (i.e. shifter) and yes I agree with you that Honda seems to have better "fit and finish" ... (those who have owned one will agree .. post 2005 models anyway)_

 

As others have said, ensure your torque wrench is GOOD quality AND calibrated properly.  I used to use a cheap torque wrench in the past and have snapped bolts before ... forked out for a good model, and problem solved.  

Edited by supervokes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A useful chart. I would recommend using more digits in the conversion factor so that the conversion is more accurate, though. The conversions are off by no more than a few 100ths of a ft lb so the effect in real life use is nil but, because the table precision is to 100ths the numbers should be accurate to 100ths.  It is the engineer in me talking.  I have a similar chart of my own that I use.

I used a conversion web site to do the math. I have no idea how accurate they might be but I figure that a couple hundredths of an inch pound isn't enough to get worked up about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Either way I shouldn't have bolts snapping in half so easily never had any problems with my Honda

 

You must be lucky in a bad way.  I'm in the same group that thinks you need to have your torque wrench calibrated and then make sure that you are using the correct spec's, I bought my 300 2 years ago and have yet to have a single nut or bolt come loose or snap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For smaller bolts, just use a 1/4"drive and some locktite.

 

Its seems that something is not right if your breaking soo many...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bought a 2012 ktm 250xc and I donno if it's just mine or what but had it for 6 months and so far my shifter, kickstarter, muffler , clutch cover cylinder head bolts have all come loose, and the worst part is when I tighten them "to torque specs" they either strip the inner threads or snap completely, 3 cylinder head bolts are stripped beyond repair had to replace kickstart and shifter shafts due to snapped bolts inside them and also have stripped clutch cover and snapped exhaust bolts, huge piss off. Doesn't take much torque to do this damage either. I was wondering if anyone else has these problems with ktm or if I just got a dud

Thanks

 

 

Parts falling off is standard for KTMs.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A useful chart. I would recommend using more digits in the conversion factor so that the conversion is more accurate, though. The conversions are off by no more than a few 100ths of a ft lb so the effect in real life use is nil but, because the table precision is to 100ths the numbers should be accurate to 100ths.  It is the engineer in me talking.  I have a similar chart of my own that I use.

why? even high quality torque wrenches are only so accurate. my click type snap on's can be off 4-6%, my techangle snap on can be off 2-3%.

 

photo_zpsbcd58633.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

why? even high quality torque wrenches are only so accurate. my click type snap on's can be off 4-6%, my techangle snap on can be off 2-3%.

 

 

 

If you mean "why does the table need to be accurate to 100ths", it doesn't. The table would be just as useful (if not more so) if the ft-lb and in-lb numbers were rounded to whole numbers.  I was simply pointing out that if the results in a table (any table for any purpose) are displayed to the second decimal, they should be accurate to the second decimal. That was my only point.

 

I have my own table and it rounds down to whole numbers. One thing I may do to it in the future is to limit the ft-lb column to torques available on my ft-lb torque wrench and same thing for the in-lb column and my in-lb torque wrench. That way I won't have useless numbers like "4 ft-lb" on the chart which I cannot dial in on the torque wrench.

Edited by Badunit
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×