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Having Trouble Leaning the Bike Over

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I have trouble getting my bike lean't over in rutts  , i think my style is pretty good , sit up on the tank , outside elbow up , inside leg out  straight and look through the turn ... Its not the bike 2013 ktm 350 sag set to 100mm all the rest to stock .

 

    I always seem to pop the front wheel out the rutt just after half way round the corner, its very very frustrating .. 

 

  To get the bike leant over do you use your outside knee to push against the tank to push the bike over while the insde leg is out straight , i hope yopu understand as im nearly there and just need to find this final piece of info .. thanks .

Edited by watto2013

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I bet you're not looking far enough ahead. If you look down at the rut, you will pop out of it. You kinda have to look where you wanna go, not where your ABOUT to go.

To get the bike leaned over, I counter steer, then truck steer into the rut. Then you need to lean with the bike with your inside leg up and your outside foot putting pressure on the peg.

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Sounds like your inside leg is getting in the way and not allowing you to lean the bike over far enough. Make sure your inside leg is up high enough that you can lean the bike over without the handlebar hitting your inside leg. Also, when you're almost half way though the rut start looking at the end of it. This will help you not only stay in the rut but also hit your exit line. 

 

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All of the above is good advice. I also remember reading about RC saying he would feather the clutch to get it to drop back into a rut if it started to climb. But I would almost guarantee you are doing what Tye mentioned and looking at the rut. It's the most common problem with staying in a rut.

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Every time I have this issue it has to do with what Gary describes.  You may be riding a Honda 50 or a CRF450...regardless you have to get your leg up and get the thing pitched over.  When you line her up and hit it with the correct speed it has to be leaned over far enough.

 

Are we talking vet ruts or expert ruts...big difference haha.  Was it Tye who had a great way of describing all this?  Somebody take it I am going to sleep.

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HI, in this topic again read that you have to put pressure on de OUTSIDE peg. I´m confuse, because there is a tutorial video made by Jeremy McGrath, he repeats many times that the pressure is on the INSIDE peg, when you corner stand up.

Can anyone explain to me the difference and the details?

 

Sorry for my english, i live in Bolivia South America.

 

Thks

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You have to weight the outside peg to stabilize the bike a little. Your kind of pressing the bike into the ground. You can't weight the inside peg because your foot is in the air off the pegs.

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"weigting the outside peg" is described in the "overleaning bike" thread pretty well... When entering a turn standing, you weight the inside peg to lean it over... after that both pegs are weightet equally unless you want to change the leaning angle again or have to react to bumps etc...

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Could it be that your rear end is sitting too high.  Maybe you need to increase your sag a bit.  Or did I get that backwards.

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I have trouble getting my bike lean't over in rutts  , i think my style is pretty good , sit up on the tank , outside elbow up , inside leg out  straight and look through the turn ... Its not the bike 2013 ktm 350 sag set to 100mm all the rest to stock .

 

    I always seem to pop the front wheel out the rutt just after half way round the corner, its very very frustrating .. 

 

  To get the bike leant over do you use your outside knee to push against the tank to push the bike over while the insde leg is out straight , i hope yopu understand as im nearly there and just need to find this final piece of info .. thanks .

 

This issue has little to do with bike set up...or how you weight the pegs.  Peg weighting is key for flat corner exits..as it allows you to unweight the seat, and adjust the lean of the bike more quickly by over leaning an underleaning the bike very quickly.  By weighting the outside peg, you create a load triangle...outside foot, and two hands.  This triangle takes weight off the seat..allowing the bike to move around under your body more easily.

 

This lean adjustment technique is not really used in ruts.  Look at the pros in rutted turns.  Their body is straight in line with the bike.  Same angle.  Weighting the pegs one or another does nothing.  The best way to adjust the bike in a rut is to get it all right from the start...so you DONT have to adjust.  This is fundamnetally different than most other MX skills...where you are always correcting .  But if you do have to adjust, you want to have erred on the side of too much lean...which you then correct with more thottle...and more speed...to hold you up.

 

You have to lose your fear of lowsiding it.  In fact, your (learning) GOAL needs to be to lowside the bike and crash.  Lean it over TOO much...THEN learn to use the throttle to hold the bike in the rut.  You can not learn this skill from the "other side" (ie..leaning too little).  The reason for this...is if you lean it over too little...you can never learn the skill of how to hold the bike up (by up...I mean not falling over all the way lowside) with the throttle   Deep rutted corners are a very different technique from flat turns, or even bermed turns.  The corner entry is a lot different.  It is very much a leap of faith.  Watch the fast guys.  Look at how much they lean bike over before they are even in the rut.  What do you think would happen if they did that...and there were no rut?  They would crash lowside, plain and simple.  So you have to learn to just let the bike fall over...such that the rut "catches" the bike...and you catch it with throttle.

 

Body position fore and aft is not critical....because you are in a rut.  If you get all the way forward as you would for a flat or berm corner...you will have a harder time getting your leg in the right position when leaned way over.  This is the reason you see many riders more central and back on the bike when they sit in a rut.  It gives you more room to get the leg in the right spot.

 

It is a mental challenge for sure.  I still pop out of ruts high side all the time....and it is all mental.  It is a lack of committment early.  Lowsiding and falling over is MUCH less dangerous than poping out to the highside...yet your mind makes you do things (go slower, lean less) that make it more likely that you will highside out...  Make a 2nd gear turn track.  Disc it and water the heck out of it....so it ruts up deep.  Then go out and fall over a lot.  Your goal is to almost low side...but then learn to apply throttle to save yourself from lowsiding.  You are going to get dirty.  That is the only way.

 

Another good drill is to cut a 180 with a ledge rut.  Basically a flat turn....with a vertical wall...about 8" high around the outside.  This will behave the same a nasty hooked over rut...but be much less mentally intimidating.

Edited by Blutarsky
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HI, in this topic again read that you have to put pressure on de OUTSIDE peg. I´m confuse, because there is a tutorial video made by Jeremy McGrath, he repeats many times that the pressure is on the INSIDE peg, when you corner stand up.

Can anyone explain to me the difference and the details?

 

Sorry for my english, i live in Bolivia South America.

 

Thks

 

The important thing is getting the weight off the seat, that way you can adjust the bike lean to react to instantaneous changes in grip.  When you are sitting, you have your inside leg out.  Naturally, you will put a lot of weight on the seat.  By weighting the outside peg....you transfer load from the seat, to your outside peg, and your hands.  This creates a triangle of support...which disconnects your body from the bike a bit more.  This then allows you to adjust the bike to maintain grip.  To get the tire on edge (bike lean) more, you will pivot your butt around the seat edge, while driving the bars inside..like a parallelogram.  To get the tire on edge (bike lean) less...you drive the bar outward.  In either case...you have to create a triangle...by weighting the outside peg.

 

When standing, you have both feet on the pegs...so most all your weight is on the pegs...very little is on your hands.  You can not "pull" up on the peg.  To lean more...you must weight the inside peg more.  To lean less...you unwieght the inside peg...and weight the outside peg.  You can also use your knees when standing.

Edited by Blutarsky

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I have trouble getting my bike lean't over in rutts , i think my style is pretty good , sit up on the tank , outside elbow up , inside leg out straight and look through the turn ... Its not the bike 2013 ktm 350 sag set to 100mm all the rest to stock .

I always seem to pop the front wheel out the rutt just after half way round the corner, its very very frustrating ..

To get the bike leant over do you use your outside knee to push against the tank to push the bike over while the insde leg is out straight , i hope yopu understand as im nearly there and just need to find this final piece of info .. thanks .

when I come into ruts I'm on the front brake a little. That keeps me in

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