Is my stater bad? Electrical prob?

Hello, I recently purchased a used dual sport XR4 that is not properly recharging its battery. However, with a fully charged battery, all my turn signals work as well as my horn.

 

I am running a 55 Watt head light and at idle my stater is producing about 20 volts AC.  It produces around 40 AC when revved.  I just purchased a new regulator thinking that it was bad since it was only circulating 5 volts but my new Baja Designs DC regulator/rectifier also only circulates 6 volts DC .  Consequently, it is not charging my battery. 

 

Unfortunately I do not know if I have a stock stater or not, but if it is then it should be producing at least 55 or up to 90 watts (so says information on other forums).  Also, my voltmeter can not measure watts so I am not sure if my stater is to blame or if I need to do something else.

 

***I disconnect my headlight to see if that would increase the volts coming out of my rectifier but it actually decreased the amount of volts coming from the rectifier...is that normal?

 

Any and all help would be greatly appreciated!!!

 

Thanks!

 

 

Disconnect the reg/rec and hook up an incandescent light bulb to the stator wires.  If you think it puts out 90 watts, then use a 90 or 100 watt bulb and see if it reaches full brightness when you rev it.  If it's 55 watts then use a 60 watt bulb.  

Alright, I look into getting some bulbs to see if I can determine the Wattage.  I wish there was an easier way to determine that though...

You can calculate wattage using ohm's law. Power (p) = volts (e) x current (I).

If you don't have or can't measure the current, you can use resistance.

P = I (squared) x R

Or P = e(squared)/R

Edited by chattyXR

If a battery is bad it will not accept a charge. My first thought would be a bad battery but the suggestions in the previous post should be done to verify the electrical system is OK.

You cant measure the output of the rectifier/regulator without a battery or cap hooked to its output, the voltage will always look low.

You can calculate wattage using ohm's law. Power (p) = volts (e) x current (I). If you don't have or can't measure the current, you can use resistance. P = I (squared) x R Or P = e(squared)/R

 

Thanks, I was wondering how I could get a proper Wattage reading.

 

If a battery is bad it will not accept a charge. My first thought would be a bad battery but the suggestions in the previous post should be done to verify the electrical system is OK.

 

The battery is new, the old battery was bad

 

You cant measure the output of the rectifier/regulator without a battery or cap hooked to its output, the voltage will always look low.

 

Good to know!  I will make sure the battery is plugged in to measure the correct voltage.

 

THANK YOU FOR ALL THE HELP!!!! :cheers:

Hopefully it is that stater,  if it isn't,  I will have NO CLUE what to do... :mad:  

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