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rear tire squirm?

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so I have a 93 xr600r, 17in Warp 9 rims and pirelli rosso corsa 2's.  on turn in I get some rear end squirm but I am not sure why?  I am not ham fisting the gas or anything.

 

I have tried lower psi 24 and 31 psi in the rear and it still acts the same?

 

what do you guys think?

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what kind of turn, what kind of speed, temps, road conditions.  has your suspension been setup or at least rebuilt?  Thats a 20 year old bike.  At the very least you need to make sure the front and rear are balanced.  Are the tires new/broken in?  Until you get the mold release out of the tire it will wiggle a bit.  Where is your preload set, rebound and comp dampening?

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well i felt the same thing when i had the stock rims and on/off road tires so I dont think its the tires. I have not messed with the rear shock so might need to first set the preload.  How much preload for only street riding?

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check all the bearings in the rear of the bike. Swingarm, shock, and linkage. If they aren't right, nothing will be, mno matter how many adjustments you make

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^^^ exactly.  I assumed it showed up when you put 17s on.  The needle bearings in suspension links get dirt and grime, water etc packed in them.  I grease mine every year.  If you dont they will be dry as a bone and rusted.  If the suspension links dont work right it wont matter what the shock is trying to do. 
 

for the sag i would start between 65-80mm somewhere.

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To check the bearings, have someone sit on your bike, and move the rear suspension while you watch the linkage. Make sure all the joints are moving smoothly, and not binding anywhere. If you see anything which doesn't look smooth, the bearings needs to be replaced. After that step is done, put the bike up on a stand, so the rear wheel is hanging. Make sure the stand is not touching any part of the suspension. Now, click the bike into gear, and grab the rear wheel. Move it up and down. There should be no freeplay whatsoever. If you feel the wheel go up, and down without any resistance, then kinda clunk, then resistance, your bearings are shot. Now grab the wheel, and try to move it back and forth, while watching the axle area. There should be no movement. If there is, you will need new axle bearings. Now grab the swingarm, and try to move it side to side. Again, no play is allowed. ANy play, and your bearings need to be replaced. Lastly, check your spokes. Take a small wrench, and tap every spoke. Every spoke if tight, should give a nice tone. If you get a dull thunk, or just a tap noise, that spoke is loose, and needs to be tightened. Tightening old spokes can be a real chore....

Edited by 717 MOTORSPORTS

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WOW 717 some great info there! I will check on these things , I would hope the wheel bearings and spokes are good as they are new rims/bearings but I will def check all those things out!

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After those are known to be good, then start cranking your shock's rebound adjuster tighter. The XR series have very soft suspension, with quick rebound for woods riding.

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