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DRZ adventure tourer?

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I've had my DRZ now for several months but it's been sitting for nearly all of that after developing a VERY loud engine within 200 miles of my buying it. In that brief time though, I fell in love with it - having ridden only tall HEAVY beasts before this (GL500, DL650, now a R1200GS), the DRZ-SM was suuuuuuuuuch a fun ride! Alas, just as I was starting my mods, the engine borked up, and I put it aside for winter.

 

So, a brief recap: I had another thread which was kind of my basic intro, now it's time to do the new (full) build.

 

When I got her (2006 DRZ-SM):

null_zpse3a1bb8e.jpg

 

Immediate changes included:

 - swapped on FMF Q4 w/ Powerbomb headpipe

 - fixed leaky fork seals

 - JD carb kit

 - steel braided brake lines all around

 - new front fairing (Britannia Composites Lynx fairing)

 - black plastics all around

 - skid plate

 - Wolfman side racks

 

How she looks now:

photo_zpsceb36d51.jpg

 

We got her all buttoned up, but on the very first ride around the block (I didn't even get my turn  :banghead: ), the engine was louder than the new exhaust. So fun was put on hold until winter project season came around and we had time to figure it out.

 

Well, that time is finally here (yay!). The plan is to make this bike a light adventure tourer. To that end, my thoughts are:

 

 - Big bore kit, either CW or Athena

 - Debating the stroker, I'm not sure if the engine would be too high strung to go too far from civilization (increase compression, decrease reliability?)

 - ACT WR gears (gonna have to screw around a bit with sprocket size for this, not sure which direction to go on a SM?)

 - FCR39 carbs

 - Either a set of Hotcams or DRZ-E cams, not sure which is the better combo?

 - Upgraded stator

 - Sargent seat (I've always had good luck with them over Corbin)

 - Keep the IMS tank it's got (may look for somewhere to add a small rotopax)

 - lower foot pegs for leg room (Moose racing has a 1/2" offset pair)

 - soft bags (been eying the Magadans but have the Wolfman for now)

 

The engine's getting the full workup despite being (in my mind) fairly low mileage. The bike's got less than 12k miles so I don't know what the hell happened, but hopefully with a little work she'll be reliable again. This'll be both a street bike for me (capable of highway running) and a light adventure (offroad) touring bike. My main bike right now is a 1200GS and while I love it, she's so danged big. Anyway, I'm hoping the DRZ will be the bike I should have started out on, with a little extra HP kick to make her more fun. ;)

 

Any thoughts on what else I should do? 

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I would do a low compression,mild cams,470cc stroker with the ACT gears......I think it will be a great adventurer. I maybe would consider some sort of large 40mm or so CV carb over the FCR carbs for adventuring, but I do not know which one will bolt on to the DRZ.

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Nice build, I'm heading that direction with my E while my SM will be stay my daily commuter.

 

What adv mods I've done so far on my E model:

 

Extra large Zeta hand guards for better wind protection

Wind shield - DIY

Headlight protector - DIY

Spots for extra light

Tube liners in the wheels

Lowered the compression to the S's 11.3:1

Changed gearing from 14/47 to 15/47 for better cruising

Hyde Bash plate

TT case guards

TT MCCT

LED indicators all round, LED tail light to leave more power available for accessories

Larger battery

Billet alu GPS holder with a Garmin eTrex 30

Giant loop soft luggage

Handlebar risers

 

Todo:

 

Long range tank (Safari 17l)

Rear luggage rack

Front disc guard

Radiator fan

Maybe ACT WR at some stage

Kick start

 

Keep this thread updated with your progress if you will.

Edited by Nellisvan

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I've had my DRZ now for several months but it's been sitting for nearly all of that after developing a VERY loud engine within 200 miles of my buying it. In that brief time though, I fell in love with it - having ridden only tall HEAVY beasts before this (GL500, DL650, now a R1200GS), the DRZ-SM was suuuuuuuuuch a fun ride! Alas, just as I was starting my mods, the engine borked up, and I put it aside for winter.

 

So, a brief recap: I had another thread which was kind of my basic intro, now it's time to do the new (full) build.

 

When I got her (2006 DRZ-SM):

null_zpse3a1bb8e.jpg

 

Immediate changes included:

 - swapped on FMF Q4 w/ Powerbomb headpipe

 - fixed leaky fork seals

 - JD carb kit

 - steel braided brake lines all around

 - new front fairing (Britannia Composites Lynx fairing)

 - black plastics all around

 - skid plate

 - Wolfman side racks

 

How she looks now:

photo_zpsceb36d51.jpg

 

We got her all buttoned up, but on the very first ride around the block (I didn't even get my turn  :banghead: ), the engine was louder than the new exhaust. So fun was put on hold until winter project season came around and we had time to figure it out.

 

Well, that time is finally here (yay!). The plan is to make this bike a light adventure tourer. To that end, my thoughts are:

 

 - Big bore kit, either CW or Athena

 - Debating the stroker, I'm not sure if the engine would be too high strung to go too far from civilization (increase compression, decrease reliability?)

 - ACT WR gears (gonna have to screw around a bit with sprocket size for this, not sure which direction to go on a SM?)

 - FCR39 carbs

 - Either a set of Hotcams or DRZ-E cams, not sure which is the better combo?

 - Upgraded stator

 - Sargent seat (I've always had good luck with them over Corbin)

 - Keep the IMS tank it's got (may look for somewhere to add a small rotopax)

 - lower foot pegs for leg room (Moose racing has a 1/2" offset pair)

 - soft bags (been eying the Magadans but have the Wolfman for now)

 

The engine's getting the full workup despite being (in my mind) fairly low mileage. The bike's got less than 12k miles so I don't know what the hell happened, but hopefully with a little work she'll be reliable again. This'll be both a street bike for me (capable of highway running) and a light adventure (offroad) touring bike. My main bike right now is a 1200GS and while I love it, she's so danged big. Anyway, I'm hoping the DRZ will be the bike I should have started out on, with a little extra HP kick to make her more fun. ;)

 

Any thoughts on what else I should do? 

 

1 don't mess with higher output stators. they'll burn out on a country road somewhere between home and nowhwere. definitely closer to nowhere.

2 you have a windshield, cool. 

3 3000+ lumens of led lights, or a harley davidson LED headlight + some auxillaries (they DONT have to be expensive to be good) to flood the road with light. 

4 any type of toss over SOFT bags sounds great. i like the wolfman STYLE, but i've seen people make better bags out of a used pair of pants ;-)    .... soft bags won't break your subframe when you drop it, like hard bags will. 

5 big bore, stroke, blah blah blah. more power ? in a drz ? nah, for me reliability is paramount when going the distance. the WR transmission gears makes a lot more sense. 

6 did you see the mega thread on advrider specifically for drz's ? 

7 if it were me, and i was really gong to alaska, i'd get something else. like a vstrom. 650 or 1000, doesn't matter. it's a more capable HIGHWAY bike, and still plenty of fun on the dirt roads. it also has a cush drive, stock ;-) 

8 i think that's it. :)

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I would do a low compression,mild cams,470cc stroker with the ACT gears......I think it will be a great adventurer. I maybe would consider some sort of large 40mm or so CV carb over the FCR carbs for adventuring, but I do not know which one will bolt on to the DRZ.

 

Having used my bike as an ADV tourer I can see the advantage to making more power to pull higher gearing but where that power is made is important I think.

A stroker makes power lower down in the rev range but power down low hurts the engine more, added to that taller gearing and you'll be putting a lot of strain on the gearbox - can it take it long term?

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1 don't mess with higher output stators. they'll burn out on a country road somewhere between home and nowhwere. definitely closer to nowhere.

 

I would agree with this unless you are also going to change R/R from the standard shunt type to a modern FET type.

You'd also need the stator manufacturer to approve their stator for doing this as it'll potentially create high voltage spikes when switched. You'd need to make sure the FET can handle it (which I'm sure it would or it'd be a very poor regulator but best to check with the manufacturer).

 

Best to just avoid the issue altogether, stay with the standard stator and fit a voltmeter to keep an eye on the output, if it drops below say 13.0v at your current cruising speed simply turn something off. 

Edited by DrzDick

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A cush sprocket would help smooth out your on pavement touring miles.  It's a lot cheaper and easier than relacing with a cush hub.

https://kushsprockets.3dcartstores.com/Design_ep_41.html

 

Also look at the Seat Concepts seat foam and cover.  It's really comfortable, easy to install, and a lot cheaper than buying a whole seat.

http://www.seatconcepts.com/products#!/~/category/id=1671358&offset=0&sort=nameAsc

I have the low seat and it's much nicer than stock.  The regular seat gets rave reviews for comfort over the stock- if you're tall enough, which I'm not.

Kush.JPG

Edited by motoinmoab

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http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/552694-mcct-install-guide-and-why-one-is-recommended/

 

Have you considered the possibility that your engine noise is just the stock automatic cam chain tensioner?  It's a very well documented weak link on this bike.  The manual tensioner is cheap and easy to install, and something you want to do for the long term reliability anyway.  It's easy to start your diagnosis there  -the process of elimination method-  with something you want (need?) to do anyway.

 

https://www.thumpertalk.com/shop/ThumperTalk-Manual-Cam-Chain-Tensioner-ENG-TT-MCCT1-p2006766344.html

Edited by motoinmoab

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Wow, I've never seen a cush SPROCKET before. Interesting stuff!

 

Motoinmoab, I agree it could just be the cam tensioner, but I'm looking for an excuse to do a full build up anyway. And yes, the tensioner will be replaced.

 

DrzDick/Ohgood,  So the stator upgrades actually make it less reliable? That's a new one for me, so should stick with stock?

 

Nellisvan, Nice build!

 

Bobbed06, why do the stroker and not the big bore? I would have thought the other way around...

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DrzDick/Ohgood,  So the stator upgrades actually make it less reliable? That's a new one for me, so should stick with stock?

 

 

Yep, the stock system on the DRZ is design to fully meet the requirements of the bike running with the lights on, and then a little more. I have read approx 50 watts spare, I would say that's a good estimate. I have noticed that when I have a single 55w head light running (LED side light & rear/brake) the voltage is stable at tickover, once I turn on high beam (55+55) the voltage drops at tickover but once rev'd it comes back up again (13.2volts returns back to 14.4 volts).

 

The way the regulator works on the DRZ all unused power is shorted back to the stator to stop the voltage going too high & frying the battery. This dumps heat into the stator but because it's oil cooled it can take it, to a point.

If you install a high output stator but don't use that extra power on the ancillaries (all of the time) it's going to put extra heat into the stator. This can kill the stator more quickly.

It's much better for the stator to use all of the power it can give than upgrading it and then mainly only using 70%. If you leave the stock stator on & run your headlight you know the stator is operating within it's design limits.

 

Fit a voltmeter and that way if you're running heated everything & a sat nav you can make sure your battery is still being charged. If the voltage dips down then you can decide what to turn off, if legal & safe to do so turning off the headlight can free up lots of power for running heated gear.

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Yep, the stock system on the DRZ is design to fully meet the requirements of the bike running with the lights on, and then a little more. I have read approx 50 watts spare, I would say that's a good estimate. I have noticed that when I have a single 55w head light running (LED side light & rear/brake) the voltage is stable at tickover, once I turn on high beam (55+55) the voltage drops at tickover but once rev'd it comes back up again (13.2volts returns back to 14.4 volts).

 

The way the regulator works on the DRZ all unused power is shorted back to the stator to stop the voltage going too high & frying the battery. This dumps heat into the stator but because it's oil cooled it can take it, to a point.

If you install a high output stator but don't use that extra power on the ancillaries (all of the time) it's going to put extra heat into the stator. This can kill the stator more quickly.

It's much better for the stator to use all of the power it can give than upgrading it and then mainly only using 70%. If you leave the stock stator on & run your headlight you know the stator is operating within it's design limits.

 

Fit a voltmeter and that way if you're running heated everything & a sat nav you can make sure your battery is still being charged. If the voltage dips down then you can decide what to turn off, if legal & safe to do so turning off the headlight can free up lots of power for running heated gear.

 

 

exactomondo. 

 

i've had 5 stators fail. or i'm on #5, whichever. in the past i turned off my headlight while doing slow speed trails, under the assumption i was helping the charging system keep the battery topped off. there was a lot of start/stop, tough climbs, then stop/wait. apparently this is really hard on an oil cooled stator, given how many i killed. it was always the lower third of the stator that over heated, burned off insulation and then eventually failed, never the top 2/3. 

 

the EE's i've talked with about how to prevent this have all said the same thing: re-engineer the electrical system, or just

 

leave the light on. 

 

so now i have about 40watts of unadulterated flamethrowing LED headlight, and the other stockers. so far so good. apparently the engine case savers contribute to poor heat transfer too, and the magnesium covers need to be bare in order to shed the stators heat. 

 

long story short, if you're going to alaska, use the stock stator, make sure the battery is in good condition, and CARRY A SPARE stator in your kit. it's small, not too heavy, and along with a tube of high-heat putty or jbweld, a bike saver. 

 

where are you going with your new ride ? tell me alaska ;-)

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Having used my bike as an ADV tourer I can see the advantage to making more power to pull higher gearing but where that power is made is important I think.

A stroker makes power lower down in the rev range but power down low hurts the engine more, added to that taller gearing and you'll be putting a lot of strain on the gearbox - can it take it long term?

 

Anytime you up the power the drive line is stressed more than stock. I dont know about long term 470cc durability on the ACT gears. They are just now making their way into builds. Besides you arent upping the gearing anymore than stock really, you are enabling use of a lower first gear while retaining a user friendly 5th gear.

Edited by Bobbed06

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Bobbed06, why do the stroker and not the big bore? I would have thought the other way around...

 

 

 

 

 

I said 470cc, thats a big bore stroker engine. Most people up the compression and run huge camshafts on this build. I would have a low compression (custom milled piston) 470cc with milder cams than most use (probably Hotcams with auto decomp) Most 470cc builds use a 41 FCR carb, I would find a 40mm CV of some sort to use for better altitude compensation.

 

This type of build will not be a high HP build, merely a torquier power curve better suited to putting along. This will also probably net high fuel mileage, and engine service life, along with the ability to run on crap fuel from no name gas stations. I would think this would be very smooth on the road miles as well, since you have a usable 5th gear to keep RPMs normal on the road miles.

Edited by Bobbed06

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The ACT gears are a fairly new thing, I haven't read any threads where they've been extensively tested in reference to touring or general long-term usage. In principle, they sound great: lower revs at high speeds would save some wear and tear on the engine, theoretically elongating engine life and making highway travel on a dizzer possible. That's my hope anyway. :)

I think for this build, I'm going to forego the stroker and just get the big bore kit and E cams. Research tells me that the FCR carbs aren't as bolt-on as I'd like and really, I don't need much power, just a bit higher gearing. With the cams, BB kit, rejetting and full exhaust system, I should be approaching 45-50hp which is plenty for my application.

Now to just rode the stuff and find the time. Deadlines and stuff keep getting in the way, dangit...

Edited by Ladyeclectic
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I said 470cc, thats a big bore stroker engine. Most people up the compression and run huge camshafts on this build. I would have a low compression (custom milled piston) 470cc with milder cams than most use (probably Hotcams with auto decomp) Most 470cc builds use a 41 FCR carb, I would find a 40mm CV of some sort to use for better altitude compensation.

This type of build will not be a high HP build, merely a torquier power curve better suited to putting along. This will also probably net high fuel mileage, and engine service life, along with the ability to run on crap fuel from no name gas stations. I would think this would be very smooth on the road miles as well, since you have a usable 5th gear to keep RPMs normal on the road miles.

Ah, I see what you mean. Would the different cams really make that big a difference at this point though? What's the compression on a stroker with and without changing the cams? I would have thought that doing a stroker ups the compression, making running cheap gas less of an option. I suppose different cams would do something similar, but not as drastic as the stroker.

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The ACT gears are a fairly new thing, I haven't read any threads where they've been extensively tested in reference to touring or general long-term usage. In principle, they sound great: lower revs at high speeds would save some wear and tear on the engine, theoretically elongating engine life and making highway travel on a dizzer possible. That's my hope anyway. :) I think for this build, I'm going to forego the stroker and just get the big bore kit and E cams. Research tells me that the FCR carbs aren't as bolt-on as I'd like and really, I don't need much power, just a bit higher gearing. With the cams, BB kit, rejetting and full exhaust system, I should be approaching 45-50hp which is plenty for my application. Now to just rode the stuff and find the time. Deadlines and stuff keep getting in the way, dangit...

 

Maybe low 40s at best unless you use the FCR carb, and MRD pipe.

 

I agree one guy I know did a similar build you just mentioned here and did the TAT. He preferred the stock CV carb over the FCR as well. The FCR is a great carb, but if you dont know carb tuning well (not following the sheep online either) you may not like it.

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Hot cams are E cams........  Unless you get the old stage 2's

 

If you stay with the stock carb you are really wasting time with the BB, cams and exhaust.  You need different cams in the strokers to manage compression.  You don't get decent cylinder fill and or emptying.  Wasting your time if you try BB stroker and not good cams.  Go back through the "old" posts on the early builds.  There is a wealth of information.

 

The FCR does not respond as well to altitude changes as the stock vacuum slide.  So it makes sense on the TAT.

 

As far as the ACT gears go as long as they are quality, machined well and hardened appropriately they should be fine.  The transmission is very stout in these and a minor change in diameter is no real deal.

Edited by Plane Dr

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