Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

used DRZ400sm vs. crf250x converted

Recommended Posts

im looking at getting a used drz400sm next summer. im going to be using it to get around town and also to race it at the local supermoto track. i also have a crf250x stock. would it be easier and/or cheaper to convert my 250? or get the 400sm?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

consider that the drz has about 80lbs more to lug around(depending on what year we are talking about, might be as little as 60lbs).  and stock vs stock they have nearly the same power, like low 30s at the crank.  The only thing really is how hard it will be to tag your X where you live.  Drz is a good reliable bike that does everything.  Like a swiss army knife.  But there are times you need a bigger knife:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

consider that the drz has about 80lbs more to lug around(depending on what year we are talking about, might be as little as 60lbs).  and stock vs stock they have nearly the same power, like low 30s at the crank.  The only thing really is how hard it will be to tag your X where you live.  Drz is a good reliable bike that does everything.  Like a swiss army knife.  But there are times you need a bigger knife:)

so ur saying if i convert my crf250x it will be more powerfull than the 400sm?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The CRF will be a little stouter than the DRZ because of the weight difference. Once you convert the CRF, you will still have the dirt wheels.....best of both worlds. Add an Athena big bore, and a better breathing pipe and the DRZ will be lunch for the CRF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so which will be cheaper?

You won't be happy with the stock drz power. So the money you save(1500) converting will be spent plus some to get decent power. But in the end it will always be a lot more weight to lug around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The basics to get you on the track are rims/tires, some new sprockets(preferably sprocket/chain set) just to get the right gearing.  Going from your 18 rear to a 17 is roughly like 3 teeth on the rear sprocket.  example stock drz s gearing is 15/44. stock SM gearing is 15/41.  basically the same final ratio.

 

So get a set of warp9 rims.  it will come with a front rotor(opt for the floating rotor), rear rotor and rear sprocket.  Then you just need tires.

 

If you want to make your bike street legal that takes a bit more parts, but consider that you will be spending 3k+ on a used drz SM(they hold their value) you can get a lot for that.

 

I dont think you need to worry about a big bore kit yet.  Get on the track and have some fun.  There is a lites class at most tracks.  If you put a big bore in that kicks you into the open class with any displacement bikes.  A lot of classes run 250 and the drz400 together also.  ive ridden my drz on the track and it was fun, but not like my 450s.  Also ive ridden a 250 on the track and it handled a lot better than the drz.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The basics to get you on the track are rims/tires, some new sprockets(preferably sprocket/chain set) just to get the right gearing.  Going from your 18 rear to a 17 is roughly like 3 teeth on the rear sprocket.  example stock drz s gearing is 15/44. stock SM gearing is 15/41.  basically the same final ratio.

 

So get a set of warp9 rims.  it will come with a front rotor(opt for the floating rotor), rear rotor and rear sprocket.  Then you just need tires.

 

If you want to make your bike street legal that takes a bit more parts, but consider that you will be spending 3k+ on a used drz SM(they hold their value) you can get a lot for that.

 

I dont think you need to worry about a big bore kit yet.  Get on the track and have some fun.  There is a lites class at most tracks.  If you put a big bore in that kicks you into the open class with any displacement bikes.  A lot of classes run 250 and the drz400 together also.  ive ridden my drz on the track and it was fun, but not like my 450s.  Also ive ridden a 250 on the track and it handled a lot better than the drz.

ok cool. what are floating rotors?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A solid rotor is 1 piece.  A floating rotor has a hub and a braking surface that are connected with Eyelets.  These eyelets allow the braking surface to "float" and self center in the caliper.  The solid rotors have a tendency to warp because of the heat involved. 

 

16744295.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

to clarify, if you are serious about supermoto and racing then you will end up spending a lot more on getting the right setup.  Just to get out there and have fun i would do the warp9 rims, decent tires and just use the oversized 320mm brake rotor with a caliper bracket to use your stock caliper and master cylinder on your honda.  if you like track riding then you will most likely want or need a dedicated track bike, cause the suspension really should be setup for SM.   You will then want to get a better caliper and master cylinder for the front, maybe get a slipper clutch, and then worry about big bore.  Also check with your local track one what they require for catch cans, safety wire, sliders etc.  Lots of tracks suggest sliders but dont require them.  They will save you a lot of money if you install them though.  Handguards are a good investment too!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

actually one more comment for you.  Most tracks have a sportsman class which uses street tires on the stock 18/21" rims.  You can lean just as far and have a lot of fun, you just don't get the same level of grip as you do with 17s and slick tires.  But the benefit is that your stock geometry of the bike stays the same, so it handles the same.  And you only have to buy tires, which for 18/21" rims are cheap. 

 

So your options:

 

1: Sportsman setup using stock rims/brakes and adding street tires.  You still have to have catch cans for fuel, coolant and oil but  its a relatively cheap way to get into the sport.  Probably $200 total

 

2: Get Warp9 17" rims for your bike.  They come with a rear sprocket of your size choice, rear rotor and front rotor(again opt for the little bit more expensive floating rotor).  Then you need to add tires and tubes and rim bands(or tape if you want to save $25) to protect the tubes from the spoke nipples.  Warp9 rims go for $800-$900 a set depending on if you catch a sale.  You really should have a matched set of brake pads and chain set for the SM setup but you can run what you have.  Probably $1000 - $1200 total depending on a few options.

 

3: Buy a bike that is already converted and street legal.   You see WR450s and CRF450x's converted and tagged all the time or a full track only bike.  Ive seen some go for $3k but most bring a little more.

 

4: Buy another bike and convert it.  Price of a decent starting point, at least 2k if you don't want to instantly rebuild it.  Price of setup is $1200 on top of that for the bare min like option 2.  $3200 min

 

5: Buy a drz sm or converted DRZ.  Chances are these used will be at least $3500 because they hold their value for some reason

 

There are several options along the way so there is no clear answer on what it will cost.  You could spend $10k + on  just supermoto parts if you want.

 

pick your poison:)  If you join www.supermotojunkie.com a lot of times you can find used setups going for sale. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Woah wait a minute next summer I planed in just buying a Drz. Why , we'll be cause, it has sm rims, sm brakes, and sm suspension. The suspension prolly cost 800 to set up for sm, the rims n tires 1000, oversized brakes 300, and then I'd have to get it legal so stupid little stuff like mirrors horn etc. I plan on riding street so I will most likely get a used drz. And build the motor caused I also believe a built Drz motor is more reliable then any wr or crf motor and I'm very rough on my bikes.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×