Suspension Service Questions

Hi all

My 2013 400RR is coming up for 50 hours and I'm thinking of getting my suspension serviced. First question is whether this is too soon, or if it is about the right time. I'm not riding it at racing pace or wringing the bike's neck every time I ride, much more of a weekend wobbler. Question 2: I see that the fork runs 2.5w oil, which is almost non-existent here in SA. I’d like to use Putoline oil, which is available in 5w here. I assume I'd be looking at a revalve if I went that route? Last question, if I decide to mix oils to get the 2.5w, would any modifications be necessary?

on my old Shiver i did 7.5w by mixing 5 and 10w motorex.

 

now on the sachs (advice of a specialist) i use KYB 01m oil, they don't write anything on the box but is circa 2.5w

Actual weight is relative. A good suspension shop will know brands and how they compare. One brand's 2.5w might be equal to 5w or more in another.

1. Spring size for your size and ability

2. Oil weight

3. Oil height

4 Valving.

It's like making sausage.;)

Actual weight is relative. A good suspension shop will know brands and how they compare. One brand's 2.5w might be equal to 5w or more in another.

1. Spring size for your size and ability

2. Oil weight

3. Oil height

4 Valving.

It's like making sausage.;)

Great advice. I'll speak to a couple of guys. Hilton Hayward is based locally and there is another guy who seems to be doing impressive work

On the how many hours before service question, I'd say you'd have to be pretty serious rider to notice the difference between fresh oil and oil with 50 hrs on it.  I know the maintenance nuts will go crazy on this, but I've had bikes before with 300 hours on them on the stock fork/shock oil.  And typically I change the oil when a seal goes bad or I get a revalve done.

 

I think what most guys do is when they get their forks/shock serviced they also get a revalve, so it comes back different and they can notice that.

 

So one part is the "will I notice any difference", the other part is the "will I hurt it if I go longer" question.  I am not sure how dirty these front forks are, meaning internal rubbing and other contamination of the oil.  I've run Showa forks to 150 hrs and the oil came out looking pretty fresh. 

On the how many hours before service question, I'd say you'd have to be pretty serious rider to notice the difference between fresh oil and oil with 50 hrs on it.  I know the maintenance nuts will go crazy on this, but I've had bikes before with 300 hours on them on the stock fork/shock oil.  And typically I change the oil when a seal goes bad or I get a revalve done.

 

I think what most guys do is when they get their forks/shock serviced they also get a revalve, so it comes back different and they can notice that.

 

So one part is the "will I notice any difference", the other part is the "will I hurt it if I go longer" question.  I am not sure how dirty these front forks are, meaning internal rubbing and other contamination of the oil.  I've run Showa forks to 150 hrs and the oil came out looking pretty fresh. 

 

I have to agree. Well said. Most mortals such as myself don't ride fast/hard enough to contaminate the fork oil in 25hrs let alone 50. When I changed my fork oil at about 50 hours it still looked like honey. I will say the super slippery Race Tech stuff I replaced the old oil with made a substantial difference.

 

I have since had a revalve and I'm still running my stock bushings at over 90 hours with no free play.

 

The really strange thing was the recent refresh of my WP suspension on my KTM. It had to have well over 100 hard hours since the last refresh. And the bushings were shot. That oil came out clean as well. Go figure.

Based on the advice given, I shouldn't have to worry. However, when I drowned the bike, it was in the water for about 5 minutes withthe fork seal area under the water. Could any water have made it into the forks thus contaminting the oil?

Based on the advice given, I shouldn't have to worry. However, when I drowned the bike, it was in the water for about 5 minutes withthe fork seal area under the water. Could any water have made it into the forks thus contaminting the oil?

Probably not. 

You can't mix down really....

 

For more about actual kinematic viscosity, check here: http://www.peterverdone.com/wiki/index.php?title=Suspension_Fluid   ,  http://www.mediaturbo.com/clients/marzocchi/forkoilviscosity.html

 

My local distributor (wich is regional motorex distributor) gave me the green light on mixing oils, he said, using the same brand there is normally no problems because they use the same basis.

 

i don't know how much cSt had my oil but the fork did a good improvement.

 

some kind of oil can be mixed, Motorex is one of these.

a good friend of mine, personal mechanic of Jari Mattila in the WEC, did the same with Ohlins on the racing RMZ450 of the Finn.

Edited by iceman kimi

Based on the advice given, I shouldn't have to worry. However, when I drowned the bike, it was in the water for about 5 minutes withthe fork seal area under the water. Could any water have made it into the forks thus contaminting the oil?

I would check, if the fork is hot and cools down with the water it could get some water in the fork.

I had a bike that had water get in the fork from the previous owner and rusted the dampener rods, better safe than sorry

My advice- send them to Stillwell and get them done.  If you want to do any of this your yourself you are asking for trouble.  If you need to get the mid-valve out, the cap is SUPER picky on how it goes on.  If wrong, then your clickers will be off.  

Its not uncommon for water to get in there.  Its coming from the air condensation in the strut assy.

You can mix oil weights to get the desired viscosity.

Maxima No-fade is what Cody and all beta racers run.  Its amazing oil

I always approach changing suspension fluids like changing engine fluids. Do a first change early after parts wear and seat in, then do the routine changes.

I'll get the suspension serviced next week after a the two rides I have planned next week.

I have Another question though: I dropped the bike a few too many times yesterday and I managed to get two small scratches on the right fork leg. If I run my finger up and down the fork leg, I can feel a very slight roughness on the fork leg. I suppose I'll get the shop to make sure they're ok, but should this be a priority to be fixed?

I have Another question though: I dropped the bike a few too many times yesterday and I managed to get two small scratches on the right fork leg. If I run my finger up and down the fork leg, I can feel a very slight roughness on the fork leg. I suppose I'll get the shop to make sure they're ok, but should this be a priority to be fixed?

 

similar thing happened to me, but the seal leaked, i sanded the rough edge off the chip in the chrome with 400 wet and dry, then polished it with 600, put in a new seal and it's fine. I would give it a sand and polish before it stuffs the seal.

similar thing happened to me, but the seal leaked, i sanded the rough edge off the chip in the chrome with 400 wet and dry, then polished it with 600, put in a new seal and it's fine. I would give it a sand and polish before it stuffs the seal.

Had some 400 and 600 grit in the garage. 5 minutes of work and the fork leg is smooth as silk. Thanks for the tip :D

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