Best GPS specific to riding only

California

Hi Guys. In my old age I've started to more long rides....sort of DS'ing. No more track or racing. The stuff I've been doing usually involves riding across a lot of open area to get to somewhere special. My last ride was from Dove Springs to Isabella, that kind of stuff. I think having a GPS is a good idea. I have a 10 year old Garmin. I find it hard to use. I'm looking for a new one that's easier to use and I plan to keep it strapped to my bike all the time. Its specifically for riding. Does anybody have a GPS recommendation? The price swings are incredible. I don't want to spend $500 or $600 if I don't have to. Is there a short list of units that are pretty common that most guys use?

Garmin Montana, Garmin Rugged Mount, RAM motorcycle arm to hold the rugged mount to your bike.

Power it off the battery via the rugged mount.

It seems the Oregon is a bit cheaper. Do you know what the differences are that makes up the price difference?

I have had a 60CSx for 6 years and just last month finally fell just the right way and broke the antenna. It was actually just a tip over but in the "Backdoor" by Means dry lake where the KOM was. Just ventured up a bit to see how hard that part of the race course was. Was coming down, stopped, was deciding which way to go, tipped over and, damn, broke the antenna. So now I am in the market for a new GPS as well.

I know I definitely want one with a 3-way axis tilt compass so it will read the direction of a waypoint even when stopped. My 60CSx didn't do that. I know the 72 series now does.

I and others can provide very good info but the more about how you will be using a GPS the better the feedback.

 

First up; What is the budget? Many familiar with car GPS (example Garmin Nuvi) are shocked at the cost of a more outdoor or MC specific unit. They cost more because they do more and the market is a tiny fraction of the automotive. New dumb car stuff is $100, flexible and weather proof ready to go is $300-$400 and state of the art is $500-$700.

 

Second; will the bike have 12-14v DC to power a hardwire install or were you thinking batteries. The auto and MC specific units do have a battery but will not power the unit for more then several hours, the handheld units can run multiple day rides on 2 or 3 AA cells.

 

Third; how much of a learning curve are you willing to work through. The car stuff can be run by almost anyone right out of the gate but the more functions and flexibility adds to the learning curve. Things like multiple map sets, track log recording and importation greatly enhance usefulness but add layers of complexity.

 

That said a couple things to consider are;

No GPS will trump first hand local knowledge.

No GPS will replace area paper maps, not a replacement for paper maps to the disappointment of many.

A GPS can only be as good as the user is at utilizing it.

If you are venturing out to remote areas by yourself something like a Spot locater should be considered in addition to a GPS.

 

Garmin pretty much rules the roost.

Used it's hard to beat a Garmin 60CSx with the proper maps and mount.

New, look for West Marine to put the Garmin 78 on sale for $200 and then budget for Maps and mounts ($75 & $40)

Need reading glasses you might want a bigger screen. Love your smart-phone, you may want touch screen (I don't).

 

Bruce

Edited by BDM

Yeah, for me, I liked the 60CSx but i determined I would like to have the 3 axis electronic compass so it can still provide the heading even when stopped and not holding it flat. Other than that the 60CSx served me well the past 6 years.

I have an Oregon and it works great. Touch screen is WAY easier to use than the buttons on the 62 series.

Take Slyco and a map.

That's a adventure in itself.

I have an Oregon and it works great. Touch screen is WAY easier to use than the buttons on the 62 series.

No hardwire capability though, correct? I just have my list of priorities and for me, that is close to the top.

Edited by kenshaw720

Mine is hard wired straight to the battery. I do use a small elastic band to ensure that the plug doesn't fall out, since the plug is on the bottom of the device. I've done 2 dual sport rides with mine for a total of 420 miles and it has been flawless.

Mine is hard wired straight to the battery. I do use a small elastic band to ensure that the plug doesn't fall out, since the plug is on the bottom of the device. I've done 2 dual sport rides with mine for a total of 420 miles and it has been flawless.

 

 

Which mount are you using, the RAM?

Can you also just carry spare AA's and not lose data???

 

 

I'd consider the OR  (also to hike with)  because it felt like it was half the weight of the MT.

I'm using the RAM mount. With it plugged in, the unit bypasses the battery so I leave lithium batteries in it when I'm riding. The Montana is a larger version, but the screen size is fine on the Oregon. I have no trouble following the track.

I ride with an Oregon and it's OK.  If I did not also do a LOT of off trail hiking I would ride with a Montana.  A riding buddy of mine has a Montana and loves it.  The software is the same but the larger screen on the Montana is nice.

Garmin Montana, Garmin Rugged Mount, RAM motorcycle arm to hold the rugged mount to your bike. Power it off the battery via the rugged mount.

How does the touch screen react when you wipe off the dust?  Does the screen sense this and change modes or anything like that?  How sensative is the touch screen to inputs like that?

I'll look through the bookmarks on my computer later on and see if I can find that info or at least the in depth review.

BDM is definitely right about knowing how to use the unit and also having a map and common sense.

How does the touch screen react when you wipe off the dust?  Does the screen sense this and change modes or anything like that?  How sensative is the touch screen to inputs like that?

It doesn't do anything unless you press down on the screen while touching. The screen is different then the type commonly found on phones. There are two screens, one on top of the other, and the unit can tell when the two screens come in contact and where when you press with your finger. Works excellent with gloves.

I do get accidental inputs from time to time but not many more then I got when I used my 60csx with the buttons.

60csx on the wife's CRF250X, ram mount out front on the left side. as often as she throws her bike on the ground, it has yet to have a problem. not hard wired to the bike, just swap AA batteries. No data lost. Rino 610 on ram mount on my WR450, same location, same power supply. Both work great. I didn't like the rino as much as I anticipated, not using half the functions it offers and the touch screen is just annoying. a wipe off from dust and it's user input. When it's time, another csx for me.

I am in no way using either of my gps units to their potential. Both do much more than I need. and I am in agreement, paper maps are my backup foundation.

I liked my 60CSx but if I go with a non-touch screen, I will go with the 62s.  The thing I didn't like about the 60 was it didn't have the 3-axis electronic compass.  The 62s has that functionality.  And you can get them for $249 right now which doesn't seem too bad.

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