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Whats the best way to convert to sliding guards vs the stock booties on the forks,

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I have a 01 XR4 and don't like the booties and like the more modern look of the fork sliders that are on most usd forks. I've seen them put on conventionals and would like to know what has worked for you and save myself some trial and error. Forks are stock with shim stack mods only. Thanks in advance. 

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The booties are more awesome than you realize. If you want a cooler looking bike; that's OK; buy one; but modding out the xr isn't very efficient IMHO.

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I dont think they make them new anymore. Find a used set if you can but I would suggest also using the seal savers along with them. 

 

I think Summers racing (dont think they are in business anymore) would supply them along with their fork brace. Or, you could try and find a set from a mid 90's ktm and mod them to work.

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The boots keep mud from collecting onto of the seals and going into the forks.

 

You need to add wipers to the forks.   Do a search.   This has been discussed several times.   If you find a good thread, add it to the FAQ as a post and summary and a link.

 

Thank you.

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I run two sets of the long fork skins.  I first just ran one set and then when these wore out I went to the next larger diameter size fork skin and installed this over the outside of the original set.  Now I have double the thickness in the skin which should help with any dings that you could get from roost.  They were kindof a bitch to get installed this way but it is possible with a little persuading.   I personally don't like the stock boot look either, but the fork skins clean it up a bit and give it a little nicer/updated look.  

 

I usually take the forkskins off every other race and clean them, and if it was a sandy or muddy race I take them off after every race to clean.  The neoprene skins do have a tendency to hold grit but if you clean them regularly they work really well and I haven't had any trouble with bad seals since I went to these. But you have to clean them.... 

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In my experience the boots hold in mud and grit. I like the neoprene wipers though.

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neoprene wipers fall apart, stick with your boots and quit trying to make the XR something it isnt

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The neoprene skins really don't fall apart that bad. The boots that I had allowed in dirt when they cracked and caused a fork seal failure, with the neoprene I haven't had problems.

Personally I like the looks that people give when they try to figure out what my bike is. And also I'm amazed at how many guys come up asking if that's really an XR and then usually bring up the "oh yeah! I used to have one of those!"

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neoprene wipers fall apart, stick with your boots and quit trying to make the XR something it isnt

 

Very true but everyone does at some point. It's hard to keep an XR stock for very long. The grass is always greener on the other side,,,,, until you get there. LOL!

 

FWIW, I like the old school look of the boots better than nekkid fork legs. 

Edited by michigan400

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That feeling when you make the pass stick; on an air cooled 15 year old bike with fork bellows and a license plate! Priceless.

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That feeling when you make the pass stick; on an air cooled 15 year old bike with fork bellows and a license plate! Priceless.

 

They usually pull off the course and retreat to a fashion statement after that.

 

When the fork bellows/boot appeared on bikes. it was a huge improvement over nicked fork legs and lacerated seals. 

 

Why go backwards to something that traps abrasive dirt and rubs it against the fork?  

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I've been using the full length SealSavers for the last 3 years. No nicks, no leaks, no trapped dirt or grit. 'Nuff said.

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My 97 rm 250 has conventional forks, the front number plate has a set of fork protectors on it. Maybe you can attach one on your bike.

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A Maico 501, responsible for the invention of the chest protector, amazingly gets by you on the outside berm. You throttle it out of the turn but your world has now become a hurricane of dirt and rocks . . . . 

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Thanks for the input so far. Still open for suggestions and I know its an Xr and I love it for it's simplicity and am not looking to change it much, just looking for more modern. Is the A-loop kit worth it? I'm a tall rider. Still don't think I'd beat the stock seat for comfort as I'm DSing it and plan some seat time.

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XRs retain their awesome figure no matter what they are wearing. If you want to look modern, USD swap from a CRF450X, run CRF fenders and headlight.

 

 

IMG_1347.JPG

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Easy to tell the serious riders...

Which isn't me.  I'm turning my XR400R into an XL400R.  

Just ordered the rear rack.  Already installed are a dual-sport kit, tool box, and next more street oriented tires.  

Damn, I should just put Barbie tassles on the grips, like this bike. My poor emasculated XR400R.  LOL.

A2-SX-TedescoBike.jpg

Edited by Kev_XR

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