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I have an 06 sm, has 11k miles on it and still has the Automatic cam

Chain tensioner.... My dad thinks I'm an idiot trying to put a mcct on.. He says after 03 that doesn't need to be doneanymore. Am I right or wrong? The drz never has any issues and is still runnin strong...

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I have an 06 sm, has 11k miles on it and still has the Automatic cam

Chain tensioner.... My dad thinks I'm an idiot trying to put a mcct on.. He says after 03 that doesn't need to be doneanymore. Am I right or wrong? The drz never has any issues and is still runnin strong...

 

Please tell your dad to be nice and that you are NOT an idiot...  http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/552694-mcct-install-guide-and-why-one-is-recommended/

 

Although your bike has the "newer" version, it still puts too much pressure on the chain and causes them to wear too fast...  Installing the MCCT now will extend the life of your cam chain and the cost of the MCCT is less than what it costs to have the chain replaced. 

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Dont get sucked in by all the mcct talk, your dad is right. My owned since new 05 s has 58,000kms, acct, original cam chain, no noise, no probs. Also no loctite fix. All my mates with drz's that have never seen tt site knew nothing of loctite/acct probs

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Well , if you remove the valve cover and see how much tension is on the cam chain you would understand why people change to the MCCT .

Yeah , there are many many DRZ's running around out there with no maintenance at all . There are failures we never hear about , some never have any issues .

Here , we have the option of improving reliability .. That's all , if you don't want to , good for you .

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Dont get sucked in by all the mcct talk, your dad is right. My owned since new 05 s has 58,000kms, acct, original cam chain, no noise, no probs. Also no loctite fix. All my mates with drz's that have never seen tt site knew nothing of loctite/acct probs

happy thats working out for you... 

 

With just a little bit of searching this or any other motorcycle site that has a large DRZ user group, you will see if being honest... there are common failures and issues.

 

 Folks can pretend they don't exist and ignore them.. choosing to fix if/ when it fails.

 

Or address the known common issues ahead of time, on their timeline, to minimize downtime, expense and cost.

 

It's a personal choice. ... you choose to ignore, others choose to do the reliability fixes.

 

None of the know common issues will happen to every DRZ, maybe not even 1% of all those sold, who knows,, But they are common failure points, and they will happen to some.. that is a clear fact.

There are known reliability fixes that address these common seen failure points.

 

Performing the reliability fix is done on a known and available time line (Yours), vs a point in time that is randium.

Performing the reliability fix is a cost saving measure...  small amount of time (time = $) and just a few $ in parts and supplies, vs repair costs after a starter gear fastener has backed out., or counter balancer nut come loose, primary gear nut loosens, R/R charge wire connector melts, ect ect ect.

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Something I've been thinking about for a while is the way the ACCT works. I have a half dozen Classic Jags. They all have what may be called ACCTs but they do not have the ratcheting detent that holds the chain tight. They just rely on spring pressure and they've never slipped a cam tooth in 40 to 50 years of use.

 

My 250 Ninja also has the same set up. Spring but no detent to hold it in place. Just spring action to keep a relative amount of tension on the cam chain.

 

Once when I was working on my "S" I inserted the spring about the right amount into the hole without the locking detent. The spring held the chain tight but not tight like the detent does when it locks into the new tight position. I use the MCCTs but I always wonderded if the locking type ACCT was the best design. Since my Ninja and my Jags don't have the locking part of the ACCT I wonderded how many ACCTs were of the locking type and how many weren't.

 

I wonderded about it but not  enough to try running an ACCT  after removing the locking mechinism.

 

If I was to design an ACCT I would use a piston insted of a locking mwechinism. On de-acceleration it would hold pressure on the chain but would bleed off in time and restore the tension back to spring pressure only. Maybe they already make them that way. I don't know but it would solve the the problem.

 

Tony

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Something I've been thinking about for a while is the way the ACCT works. I have a half dozen Classic Jags. They all have what may be called ACCTs but they do not have the ratcheting detent that holds the chain tight. They just rely on spring pressure and they've never slipped a cam tooth in 40 to 50 years of use.

 

My 250 Ninja also has the same set up. Spring but no detent to hold it in place. Just spring action to keep a relative amount of tension on the cam chain.

 

Once when I was working on my "S" I inserted the spring about the right amount into the hole without the locking detent. The spring held the chain tight but not tight like the detent does when it locks into the new tight position. I use the MCCTs but I always wonderded if the locking type ACCT was the best design. Since my Ninja and my Jags don't have the locking part of the ACCT I wonderded how many ACCTs were of the locking type and how many weren't.

 

I wonderded about it but not  enough to try running an ACCT  after removing the locking mechinism.

 

If I was to design an ACCT I would use a piston insted of a locking mwechinism. On de-acceleration it would hold pressure on the chain but would bleed off in time and restore the tension back to spring pressure only. Maybe they already make them that way. I don't know but it would solve the the problem.

 

Tony

 

I think you are on track with the piston rather than a locking style unit... :thumbsup:

 

There are some cars with a cam belt tensioner that use a hydraulic style actuator.  This allows a certainly amount of tension and control that eliminates slap (kind of like a steering dampener).  

 

IMO, If the DRZ tensioner only had a spring and not some type of locking system or dampener, it would probably create an unwanted "variable" cam timing situation...  Just a thought.

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Something I've been thinking about for a while is the way the ACCT works. I have a half dozen Classic Jags. They all have what may be called ACCTs but they do not have the ratcheting detent that holds the chain tight. They just rely on spring pressure and they've never slipped a cam tooth in 40 to 50 years of use.

 

My 250 Ninja also has the same set up. Spring but no detent to hold it in place. Just spring action to keep a relative amount of tension on the cam chain.

 

Once when I was working on my "S" I inserted the spring about the right amount into the hole without the locking detent. The spring held the chain tight but not tight like the detent does when it locks into the new tight position. I use the MCCTs but I always wonderded if the locking type ACCT was the best design. Since my Ninja and my Jags don't have the locking part of the ACCT I wonderded how many ACCTs were of the locking type and how many weren't.

 

I wonderded about it but not  enough to try running an ACCT  after removing the locking mechinism.

 

If I was to design an ACCT I would use a piston insted of a locking mwechinism. On de-acceleration it would hold pressure on the chain but would bleed off in time and restore the tension back to spring pressure only. Maybe they already make them that way. I don't know but it would solve the the problem.

 

Tony

 

Another way to do it is to remove the spring and adjust the ratchet as needed, just as you'd do with a manual tensioner. A bit more of a hassle, but as this needs to be done only once in a while, should make sense.

 

But i believe your idea of using only a spring is sound, I've always thought that the ratchet type, with its irreversible nature, would be forever locked at the highest temperature chain adjust it ever encountered, and then on cold winter days the chain would be over-tightened.

 

Five classic Jags ??? Wow, pics, please !

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Five classic Jags ??? Wow, pics, please !

Something I did have handy and have been meaning to do for years on this site was to use my 67 jag as my avatar.

 

I've had this car since 1972. It is and has always been my favorite.

PHTO0001_cr.jpg

PHTO0010.JPG

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Splendid, lucky you!

 

 

Not really lucky.

 

When I was barely a  teenager my dad started me out on old triumph TR2s and 3 that needed restoring. As I got older, I moved on to Jags mostly because they had a full line of sedans and sports models that used basically all the same parts. All the cars I've ever owned in my life were restoration projects. These were projects that gave me the opportunity to learn about engines, welding, painting, autobody repair and modification and upholstery work. I've learned a lot about things that use wheels over my more than 70 years.

 

I like the above car more than the others because it was a project car that I spent the most time on. In 1972 when i bought it, it had a Ford 290 motor in it. Later I put a 350 Chev motor in it and later still a 350 Chev supercharged motor. For the last 20 years  the origional 6 cylinder Jag motor has resided under the hood like it should.

 

Now days I like Motorcycle projects better than car projects. So much simpler and all the parts are so much lighter.

 

Tony

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Not really lucky.

 

My father once warned me against falling in love with a machine, it was lost on me anyway, but i guess he was right. I'd be a genius in any field today had I devoted all the time and energy this undying passion has consumed. The only progress I was able to make was downscaling to motorcycles as you have (at least partially) done. But owning that beautiful machine does make you a very lucky man indeed.

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The original acct on the drz, was the typical style used on most motorcycles, and some of those bikes, inlcluding the original DRZ had issues. But Suzuki redesigned in 03 to the present style as a reliablilty improvement, and in reality it is and was. But When talking about a stock motor and cams you may have the perspective its adaquate. However when you install non oem cams with sharper degrees of elevations or even taller lobes, it requires more effort to open the valves. added stress becomes the norm.

IMO, stock motor and present acct is fairly safe, once you modify and start stressing everything, maybe the mcct is a better option.

Edited by Spud786

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