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Can you lace a rear rim to the front hub?

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I have a stock '93 XR650L with a 21inch front rim and an 18inch rear rim. I would like to make my front wheel an 18inch rim also. Whats the best way to go about this? Is it easiest to lace a rear 18inch rim to the front hub? Would that keep you from having to reconfigure any of the from brake system?

 

Any expericnce or help with this topic would be much appreciated.

 

Thanks.

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Yes, you can lace a 32-spoke rim to the stock front hub.  However, you will need to get shorter, custom spokes from Buchanan's, or another custom spoke manufacturer.  Keeping the stock front hub allows you to keep the stock brake rotor, brake caliper, et cetera.

 

Spud :)

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It would be easy enough to run a die down the spokes to thread them shorter and then cut them to length, but keep in mind that you lose the plating. 

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Count the spokes. Most wheels have 36, yours has 32. As long as the spoke count is the same, you can lace up whatever rim you want as long as it will clear the fork legs. Several guys have done the budget stupermoto retard set-up by using a rear rim on the front. Popular with the street tracker tards also. Did that sould grumpy and jaded? Sorry... one of those grumpy old man nights. :rant:

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It would be easy enough to run a die down the spokes to thread them shorter and then cut them to length, but keep in mind that you lose the plating. 

When I fitted 17's to an XR, the spokes threads had to be rolled, not cut. Not sure what that actually involved,

but didn't cost much anyway! I bought a used 17 inch roadbike rim which was 4inches wide and the original spokes were fine, then fitted the original 17 rear rim to the front hub, which required the spokes to be shortened.

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Thanks for the advice. Does anyone have a link to a thread where someone has done this already? No point in reinventing the...wheel. Har har.

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When I fitted 17's to an XR, the spokes threads had to be rolled, not cut. Not sure what that actually involved,

but didn't cost much anyway! I bought a used 17 inch roadbike rim which was 4inches wide and the original spokes were fine, then fitted the original 17 rear rim to the front hub, which required the spokes to be shortened.

 

Good point.  

 

The difference between cut and rolled threads:

 

Rolled threads are slightly larger in diameter than the spoke itself since no metal is removed.  The threads are formed in a quick forge-like rolling process . This process is used in high production.

 

Cut threads are the same or smaller diameter since they are formed by removing metal.

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Pretty sure Thumpnred is right though I haven't counted lately. Most of the late model bikes have 32 spoke rears and nearly all bikes have 36 spoke fronts, Particularly if they're 21"s. 83-87 XRs had 36 both ends IIRC so it was just a matter of getting the right length spokes. I'd order a set from Buchanans and forget about rolling new threads on used spokes. Buchanans are larger diameter anyway which will stiffen the wheel even more for better handling. http://www.buchananspokes.net/products/spoke_kits_honda_xr.asp

Edited by valvesrule

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So it sounds like I need to get a 36 spoke 18inch rim from a 83-87 XR for my front rim and lace it with new spokes.

 

No, you need a 32-spoke rim for the front hub of your XR650L.  I also suggest you contact Buchanan's Spoke & Rim to purchase shorter, custom, stainless steel spokes for the 18-inch rim.

 

http://www.buchananspokes.net/categories/custom_spoke_sets.asp

 

I have built several custom wheels with Buchanan's spokes; they manufacture excellent spokes. :thumbsup:

 

Spud :)

Edited by SpudRider

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Good point.  

 

The difference between cut and rolled threads:

 

Rolled threads are slightly larger in diameter than the spoke itself since no metal is removed.  The threads are formed in a quick forge-like rolling process . This process is used in high production.

 

Cut threads are the same or smaller diameter since they are formed by removing metal.

 

 

  I love it when I learn stuff reading about bikes.  :)

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So it sounds like I need to get a 36 spoke 18inch rim from a 83-87 XR for my front rim and lace it with new spokes.

Except 83-87s only had 17" rims. Try for a 79-81 XR/XL250/500 or XT/TT500 Yamaha.

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Having converted a few bikes to 'supermoto' a word of caution. You can't always fit a rim that has already been drilled even if it has the correct number of holes. The spoke angle may differ depending on the hub. This is possibly more of a problem when using say a 5.0 rim on the back of an older bike. I picked up a used 17x4.5 36 hole rim for the back of our 96 YZ but my wheel builder took a look at it and said it wouldn't work because it had been drilled to fit a bike with a much wider hub with a larger diameter.

 

Fortunately, he has a shed full of used rims and he went through them comparing them against my OEM wheel until he found one that would be OK. Even better, he also had one suitable for the front.

 

The differences in front hubs using 32 spokes may not be so great, but it's worth checking. Though it sounds from what Muzz67 said that you should be OK if you stick with a  rim from an XR.

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Another possibility is finding a front wheel from an NX250, which is a 19".  I am running one on my Xr650R and it only required a new set of wheel bearings because the NX uses a smaller diameter axle.  I got the complete wheel off Ebay for $30.

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