Sand Whoops

Hey All,

 

New rider to dirt bikes, I have a whole 2 months under my belt  :thumbsup: The place I ride most has about 20 miles of trails that you could think of like a ski mountain. Everything returns the parking lot (chair lift). My favorite loop is about 3.5 miles about halfway in it goes from smooth dirt to a sand pit where the sand is super soft and the whoops are pretty big (by my standards anyways). The section is only a couple hundred yards before it goes down hill and back to the woods. I struggle every time through these things, usually bogging down and stalling the bike. 

 

Any tips would be appreciated, it's pretty frustrating to dread this section every time. FWIW I ride a 2013 TTR230 with the carb jetted. 

 

Thanks!

 

Tim

Just lean back keep steady throttle you want to try and keep the front tire even or just above the lip of the whoops and knees bent @$$ just above the seat and you should be fine

More power is better sand. Be aggressive when entering the sandy area and stay on it. As said above, stand with your weight back and on the throttle!

Let the 230 rev to get the power you need.   Go fast and keep your feet off the ground.  Speed is your friend.  Once you slow down your basically stuck.  If it's your favorite trail, eventually you'll be flying through this section and having a blast.

Lean back (butt over the back edge of the seat) and give 'er. Be sure to grip the bike with your legs and keep the RPMs up.

Where I'm riding tomorrow is all sandy whoops. I'll post some Video :thumbsup: .

 

IMO. It's all rhythm, balance and throttle control :ride: .

For sure stay on the power. I think that's a base assumption.

 

Some front tires work way better than others in sand. For example a Pirelli MS or a Mich S12 could make you feel super confident, but most mid to hard terrain tires will sink, tuck and push all day and make leave you thinking WTF every time.

 

Firmer clicker settings can make a big difference in soft sand. Get it right then wooped out berms are much easier. IE.  Slow down both comp and rebound.

do like the others have said but also trying to dig the arch of your foot towards the back of the footpeg. this tends to put your butt where it belongs way back in the seat.

Really I would try to stay somewhat neutral on the back and pull up with your arms. If you are really far back and start to swap you won't be able to put any leverage on the bike to stop it. Staying in the middle will help you react faster, especially as a beginner.

When i first started i hated the sandy parts..now i love them for some reason, I think it's the challenge.  Your first instinct is to let off the throttle, DO NOT DO THIS hahahaha.  Normally you are standing while riding, keep doing this but lean as far back as you can as to get all the weight off the front tire...but be sure to keep going and going pretty fast...don't let up on the throttle at all.  It's a huge mind-&%$#@! because your auto instincts are to let up but you have to force yourself to throttle down, get on her! hahaha After many falls in the sandy parts that's what I do.  Since yours are also with whoops, like someone had said, it's all in the rhythum..it really is..use your legs to keep control but at the same time you are letting the bike do its thing..does that make sense? basically act as if they are shocks..that's how I get over the whoops at this point..i don't jump them like some people do..just gotta find what works for you :)

do like the others have said but also trying to dig the arch of your foot towards the back of the footpeg. this tends to put your butt where it belongs way back in the seat.

I don't put my the arch of my foot on the peg to cause my butt to go back only because if I happen to have to make a quick adjustment or some weird down force happens, then I'm likely to have my foot fall off and then i'd probably crash...I just go as far back as i can.

Where I'm riding tomorrow is all sandy whoops. I'll post some Video :thumbsup: .

 

IMO. It's all rhythm, balance and throttle control :ride: .

 

We didn't end up going for until a few weeks later. These whoops don't look much on the Vid but they're the largest, consistent whoops I've ridden. I was totally rooted after about 1 minute. Started doing daily push ups again yesterday. Was a tough track in my currant condition but would have been awesome given some fitness and upper body strength.

 

Anyway, It wasn't possible for me to stay on it for that long. The whoops continued all day. I wasn't even actually expecting to be riding the Whooped out stuff that day.

 

Anyway, enough with the excuses :lol: .

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bi-wMzg-5mg

Growing up on dunes on Oregon coast here is tips I give new sand riders when they come with us.

1. Always carry momentum-keep power going even if it is just a little (find what speed bike likes to ride "on top" of sand

2. Weight towards back, never move over tank or front wheel.

3. Ignore front brake- I have had to remove levers from friends as it is habit. to use and it is usually not good

4. DO NOT gorilla grip bars. Loose and fluid and let it wobble

 

Alos everybike handles dunes/sand different. Had a KTM540 set up that gobbled whoops like Oprah does Bon-bons. Had a serious modified Suzuki RMX250 that would bury front and smash me on my head. Old XR(like 81-2) models had so much rake they just sailed on sand, Newer bikes tend to knife in due to steep rake. Raise forks in triple if possible, let out air in tires and if you have big tank don't run full as this puts weight high and forward which is wrong

That video is annoying.  If I never see another whoop I'll die a happy man, and I only made it half way through the video.

Edited by toadl

That video is annoying. If I never see another whoop I'll die a happy man, and I only made it half way through the video.

Agreed! And the rider is NOT handling them well at all!

Agreed! And the rider is NOT handling them well at all!

 

 

Agreed! Bit of lung capacity and upper body strength would help :( . Trust me, I'm under no Illusions, I know it wasn't pretty :lol: .

I did say I was rooted after the first minute. I was actually exaggerating and being a bit generous, was more like 30 seconds   :lol: .

 

BTW, most of those whoops were knee to waist deep. Like the steepness of the hills, you can't see it on Video although I expected them to look larger than they actually do. It was seriously hard work for someone in my currant condition. I couldn't have pulled the skin off a custard at the end of the track. Arms and legs were like Jelly.

Next time I ride that track I'm gonna stop and stand in them so you can see how big they actually are and then PM you a link to the Video :goofy: .

 

Final excuse is, I'm almost 43, don't work, smoke and have been into RC Helis for the last 7 to 10 years. Only my thumbs are fit ATM. On a more positive note, I can only get better. Currently, I'm still getting over the reality shock   :lol: . I also took a break after having my biggest ever get off and knocking all my teeth out, Still can't eat Pizza :banghead:  :lol: , Before that I came over a crest at WOT, Fallen tree across the track, broke a couple of ribs and punctured two lungs so took a break while I was still behind .

You don't bounce after 35-ish. Gone from over 100 kilo down to 80 kilo tops. Easy to have time off the bike and comeback like it was yesterday when you're young, fit and full of confidence, bit different when you're in ya 40's and 2nd guessing your first Instincts. In your mind you can still do it all but ya bodies telling you a different story :( . It's Extremely frustrating! Possibly, more of a confidence Issue rather than fitness.

In my defence, I did nail one corner in that 10+ minutes Video. Small steps  :lol: .

 

Sooo, now ya's know which bait to use to get me on the hook :lol: . already most likely got nerve damage, that certainly didn't help . You hit the proverbial nail right on the head LMAO!

Edited by AddictedToBling

ATB, Not sure if you tried it ... Clicker adjustment can and usually does make a huge difference. It's not unreasonable to expect/hope to need half the effort to ride your bike at the same pace on the same section of track.  Comp and rebound, fork and shock. Which way to adjust could be either, but typically stock settings on both ends are too soft for sand woops, especially on any enduro bike. Just experiment.  If you like the idea of making it easier then you could also consider firmer fork springs and revalving for firmer slow impact speed comp damping. Let the bike do more work for you. Much safer too.

Edited by numroe

ATB, Not sure if you tried it ... Clicker adjustment can and usually does make a huge difference. It's not unreasonable to expect/hope to need half the effort to ride your bike at the same pace on the same section of track.  Comp and rebound, fork and shock. Which way to adjust could be either, but typically stock settings on both ends are too soft for sand woops, especially on any enduro bike. Just experiment.  If you like the idea of making it easier then you could also consider firmer fork springs and revalving for firmer slow impact speed comp damping. Let the bike do more work for you. Much safer too.

 

 

I actually changed them before that ride and made them a lot softer. Spocks advised settings.

We weren't supposed to be riding whoops that day. With the TE bars as well they were too soft but I think It's more just a fitness, confidence thing ATM   :thumbsup: .

 

I appreciated the advice though, cheers :thumbsup: .

Edited by AddictedToBling

Growing up on dunes on Oregon coast here is tips I give new sand riders when they come with us.

1. Always carry momentum-keep power going even if it is just a little (find what speed bike likes to ride "on top" of sand

2. Weight towards back, never move over tank or front wheel.

3. Ignore front brake- I have had to remove levers from friends as it is habit. to use and it is usually not good

4. DO NOT gorilla grip bars. Loose and fluid and let it wobble

Alos everybike handles dunes/sand different. Had a KTM540 set up that gobbled whoops like Oprah does Bon-bons. Had a serious modified Suzuki RMX250 that would bury front and smash me on my head. Old XR(like 81-2) models had so much rake they just sailed on sand, Newer bikes tend to knife in due to steep rake. Raise forks in triple if possible, let out air in tires and if you have big tank don't run full as this puts weight high and forward which is wrong

I grew up riding CoosBay, WinchesterBay and Florence. We used to joke with Dad about spreading his ashes at the dunes bc we all had so many good times there, so when he died is 2007 that's what we did. My sisters, brother and I all flew up from TX to do it, rented some boring 250 quads but still had a blast.

good place to do it. I grew up in Coos County so I have a few miles on dunes. LOL

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