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Riding ruts

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Just wanted some tips on riding ruts im fine with soft single sided ruts but pact double sided ruts just kill me during races any help please thankyou

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Im talking about turning ruts because iv heard to keep front tire grounded in turns on straights i get the whole lean back and braap and let it move but with turns either i come in too fast and crash or come in too slow and cross rut or loss my balance and crash

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Im talking about turning ruts because iv heard to keep front tire grounded in turns on straights i get the whole lean back and braap and let it move but with turns either i come in too fast and crash or come in too slow and cross rut or loss my balance and crash

OK my bad, I thought you meant in straight aways.

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Makes it a lot easier if your suspensions set up right, the bike will want to follow the rut instead of jump out.

 

Also, commit and look at the exit of the corner/rut as your coming into it, you will naturally carry through it easier and faster instead of looking down at your front fender trying to navigate every inch of it.

 

Cannot stress how much looking at the end of the rut helps, i figured this out when I had issues with rutted jump faces. Every time I come up a rutted jump face, I'm already lookign at the end of the rut at the tip of the lip as i'm approaching the lip. Takes a lot of trust and confidence, and you just have to go for it because at first its not natural, but when  I started doing this my rear wheel stopped kicking out on me, making me feel much more comfortable.

 

By the way, apply this technique to all corners, rutted or not.

Edited by dan2581
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Thank you that helps but how do i know of my suspension is set up right i have never really tried fine tuning it

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Thank you that helps but how do i know of my suspension is set up right i have never really tried fine tuning it

That's hard to answer. The best thing for you to do is go to the suspension section in the forums and read all you can. I had no idea how to tune, but now, thanks to the forums, I can get it close. If you know any one that is good with suspension have them watch how your bike reacts and adjust accordingly.

Edited by scoot450R

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the width of the front tire can cause problems. if you run 90 wide try 80 instead. same with backtire. 110 might not be optimalfor cornering ruts on a 250f.

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the width of the front tire can cause problems. if you run 90 wide try 80 instead. same with backtire. 110 might not be optimalfor cornering ruts on a 250f.

Im already running a 100 in back and 80 in front

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Don't let off the gas too early! Do some late braking, it it squat your suspension and make the rear end fallow easier. When going into the rut transition your weight to the front of the bike. And when u do ur braking. Use a lot of front brake so ur front end squats well. Look at the exit! Elbows up!!! Make sure ur elbows are up!!!! When u get to the APEX which is the midway of the turn start rolling on the gas steady and then hammer down!!!! Good luck!!!

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Thanks to every one that helped i know actually have somewhat of an area to practice and i have the idea so i can only progress from here ImageUploadedByThumper Talk1384205380.836854.jpg

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Suspension as well as learning to modulate the front brake and proper clutch/ throttle control will all play a part. Keep practicing them and it will eventually all make sense. Ruts are the best part of my riding. I have trouble with sweepers and off cambers, just because the tracks I frequent don't have them. 

 

As others have said, look to where you want to go, not where you are... your front tire will follow.

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Exactly right.

 

When approaching the rut, look at the entrance to the rut, once close to the entrance of the rut, look at the apex to make sure you get your bike in the rut comfortably. Before you get on the gas to exit the rut, look at the end of rut, or even better yet, at the next obstacle on where you want to go. The bike will pull you through the rut so fast that you will have forgot what you were doing or where you were. There is no such thing as too fast, or too slow, going through a rut. It takes practice, a lot of practice, but once you nail it, you'll have the confidence of the world going into the next obstacle, and that my friend is a feeling that nobody can explain.

Practicing ruts in the mud, I've found, is one of the best ways to practice them. Throttle isn't as dramatic of a response as hard packed, gives you a little bit more lenience, and if you fall it kind of penalizes you as now you have a muddy a handlebar to deal with.

 

Good luck!

Makes it a lot easier if your suspensions set up right, the bike will want to follow the rut instead of jump out.

 

Also, commit and look at the exit of the corner/rut as your coming into it, you will naturally carry through it easier and faster instead of looking down at your front fender trying to navigate every inch of it.

 

Cannot stress how much looking at the end of the rut helps, i figured this out when I had issues with rutted jump faces. Every time I come up a rutted jump face, I'm already lookign at the end of the rut at the tip of the lip as i'm approaching the lip. Takes a lot of trust and confidence, and you just have to go for it because at first its not natural, but when  I started doing this my rear wheel stopped kicking out on me, making me feel much more comfortable.

 

By the way, apply this technique to all corners, rutted or not.

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I wanted to add something else that helps me on non-bermed corners and ruts. Not sure if its just a 2 stroke technique or if it works on the. 4 strokes too. When I took lessons I was taught to lean the bike over in ruts/non bermed corners while leaving my shoulder blades in a straight verticlenline with the foot pegs. Also you get your ass right on the edge of the seat. For some reason this plants the hell out of the bike in tough ruts and especially flat corners. It allows me to rail them instead of worrying n if my tires are gonna slip out.

Here's what it looks like

ImageUploadedByThumper Talk1384403587.567410.jpg

The alternative is leaning with the bike into the turn, this is definitely how I ride berms and it definitely allows me to go faster through them. I Also do this on some ruts that are wide and deep that ride like berms.

Here's what this looks like

ImageUploadedByThumper Talk1384403719.506600.jpg

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Rebound settings make a huge difference in the way a bike reacts to cornering ruts. Try slowing the rebound down a few clicks front and rear (turn rebound clicker "in"-clockwise). This will keep the suspension from rebounding too soon and bouncing you out of the rut. 

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Today at the track, every time there was a kids session...the faster riders went over to a tight little turn track they had cut, ripped and watered.  It was pretty deep, and rutted up.  There were some fast riders working on their rut turning...chasing each other around.  You can tell who is serious about going fast...and who is at the track to show off.  The guys who want to go fast...they spend time at the turn track.

 

I was of course terrible when it was really soft and muddy.  I even had to go back and clean all the mud off my bike and me...  After a while, I started to get the hang of it. 

 

The difference I could see between the best guys...and the so so guys, was how early they committed to the lean.  The really fast guys were in freefall...waiting for the rut to catch them.  They would lean the bike in hard, and in such a way that if the rut was not there...they were going down HARD.   If you do not do this, you can not be fast.  It was such a tight track...with DEEP and sharp rut turns...that if you really committed to the lean...your pegs and bars would drag.  The speeds were slow...so towards the end I just went for it...and committed early...and basically fell into the rut.  Amazing.  You are SURE you are going to low side into the mud with a thud...but you just use the throttle to hold you up...and it is like a slingshot...

 

Just committ EARLY...and aggressively...your goal is to lean so hard you are SURE you are going to low side and just auger in...but then learn to use your throttle to hold the bike up....

Edited by Blutarsky

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