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Question about walky talkies while riding

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Hi guys i was wondering who uses walky talkies when riding with friends.. 

 

I was looking around but i couldnt find any feedback, reviews of ppl using walkytalkies when riding on dirtbikes.

 

So my question is do any of you guys use them and if does it work good enough ?? 

 

I found these:

 

http://www.airsoft.nu/reviews/topcom-twintalker-9500-airsoft-edition/

 

It has noise reduction and it and has a vox function with a headset (is it good enough?)

 

If anyone knows any better options please tell me!

 

Any tips are wellcome!!

 

Kind regards

 

 

 

 

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2 way radios would probably be a good idea for when you get split up from your 'riding buddy'. I have heard the bluetooth setup is pretty awesome but $alty

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Yea i heard so too, do you think 400 meters is enough when riding? 

 

I mean 400 meters is quite far rite?

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400 meters is approximately 1300 feet so if you are on dunes far from each other I would say go farther, but if you are trail riding then go for it that should be perfect and the noise reduction would be great for it. Good luck  

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About 10 years ago my daughter took a racing class called American Super Camp. It’s for racing flat track. They used a devise called a “Chatter Box”. Basically a two way radio system that clips inside your helmet. She said it worked great. Could hear and talk just as good as a telephone sitting inside your living room.

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On the bikes, no.  Good trail/guide discipline and everyone knowing the destination before-hand makes things easy.

Stop at the intersections and regroup, thumbs-up if everybody's good to continue on. 

 

On sleds, yes, almost everyone I ride with has a radio.  Thing with snowmobiles is you're not limited to trails... so while our group may be heading north through the trees, one guy may take a different line higher up the ridge, another guy may hang lower towards the meadow.  If one guy gets stuck, you could spend hours looking for them. 

Radio's in my pack, speaker/mic on the chest strap of my pack.  Crank it up and I can hear it squawk when I'm riding, with the engine at idle I can have a conversation on it. 

 

Also why I have a bright orange helmet.

 

DSC05876-L.jpg

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Walkie talkies are a great "tool" to have while on the trails especially if you like riding fast with your buddies or if your riding with younger kids.

At least once a month we always find some young guys that are hauling ass through the woods that lost somebody and the panick doesnt kick in untill it starts to get dark. I ride with my dad and younger brother and boy have those walkies saved us a bunch of times. We dont have anything special just handheld motorola walkies straped to our packs or chest protecters in the front to be able to hear.

As for range keep in mind if you ride in the woods the range will not be as stated by the manufacture as trees and hills and other stuff will interfere with the signal.

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Ive used a lot of comm devices some work good most dont work well at all. Mostly due to line of sight or poor quality

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This is a good topic. If you're like me and go out to the desert where one wrong turn can leave in the corner of nowhere, a walkie (two way radio) is the best if you go out with friends. All you have to do is climb to the highest peak. Of course it depends on how much wattage you're using, but generally, if you and your guy both climb high peaks, you can get about 3-5 miles on a good day. I use to use them, and still have a few laying around, but ever since I decided to fly solo, I really don't have any use for them. I suppose going out to the middle of desert and riding solo isn't one of my brightest ideas, but the truth is, when you go solo, you don't have to hassle a lot of things. The trade off is about the same for me, no one else goes, that's fine, but damn if something happens, I'm screwed. So with that in mind, I also tote a cell just in case. You might get lucky and get reception and at least be able to dial 911 and hopefully get yourself pinpointed. Hasn't happened yet, so knock on wood. Truth is, I'm so used to flying solo, I don't think about it much anymore. I use to, but once you get over the fear of being stranded it becomes second nature. That's why at least for me, there are two (2) important factors when I ride solo, a), always keep your bearing where you are and where your camp is, and B) let go of that bike if you see you're going to crash and burn to the point of breaking a bone. At least if you crash and the bike is wasted, you still have two (2) legs to walk on, and if you have to walk a mile or more like what happened to me my last ride when the tank went dry, the walk isn't so bad so long as you have a MP3 player. The trick is finding your bike on the return when you come back to fetch it. "Where's that bike" !!!

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I friend and I have been dual sporting for several years now.  Were more light trail riders than we are adventure riders.  We both were avid mountain bikers back in the day and on one ride we had the last rider in our group crash and break their leg in the last technical section before a really fun and fast descent.  We had whistles in case of emergencies but the rest of us were so far down the trail that we didn't hear the whistle when he tried to call for help.  About a half hour after all but this one rider were back at camp, a group of us headed back up the trail to find him and help him get down and to a hospital.  After that event, we all got FSR/GSR radio's which we attached to the strap of our hydro-packs.  This allowed us to hear others in our group (we set all of our radios to the same frequency and sub-frequency or code) and got heads up on what was coming up or about other riders or trail users as well as what the leaders were going to do.  

So when a couple of us started dual sporting motorcycles, we got kits that mounted a microphone and speakers in our helmets that were connected to a thumb 'push to talk' switch and were connected to radios that went into either a pocket in a jacket or into a hydro-pack.  The radios are still FSR/GSR models but we've found that it's not uncommon for the signal to go for up to 15 miles, again depending on the terrain.  Most of the time all of us are in the same area of canyons and we can talk over a lot longer range than you would think was possible.  Line of sight still applies but over all it hasn't been an issue.  For the ability to have someone in the lead group be able to call back to riders at the very end a couple of miles up a canyon has been awesome.  On one ride, one rider stopped to talk with hiker to answer questions about the trail and where they were while the slower riders of the group kept riding on.

At first I wasn't sure that I would like having the radio as it gives the other riders the ability to talk right into your head (that's how it felt to me) but truthfully it hasn't been an issue.  We can now talk just like we did when we were riding our mountain bikes while riding.  
 

:ride:

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We ride with Motocomm SK-1000 headsets. I highly recommend them and the company.

 

 

BTW I have absolutely nothing to do with the company or its employees or anything. I live 2 states away.

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I carry a 2 meter radio when riding but don't have it set up to use while riding.  I usually ride alone.  That radio saved my ass in June as I was injured in a remote area.  Phone signal was too weak to use.  I reached somebody 24 miles away and got help.  

2 meter radios are much more expensive than FRS/GMRS and you need a license but have much greater range.  If I had to buy another I would get a 2m/70cm dual band  which would cover FRS/GMRS.  

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I carry a 2 meter radio when riding but don't have it set up to use while riding.  I usually ride alone.  That radio saved my ass in June as I was injured in a remote area.  Phone signal was too weak to use.  I reached somebody 24 miles away and got help.  

2 meter radios are much more expensive than FRS/GMRS and you need a license but have much greater range.  If I had to buy another I would get a 2m/70cm dual band  which would cover FRS/GMRS.  

:nod

 

DSC00068-L.jpg

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Payed 60 bucks for a pair that works up to 10 miles away. Worked great riding in woods alone.....until my mom got a hold of the thing in the house and asked if I was okay every 2 minutes.....Kinda done away with 'em unless I go out riding with someone....But for the PITA of hauling it around, it's easier to just carry a cell phone. (We have zero problems getting reception anywhere around where I go riding.) I once saw someone take a zip loc bag and duct tape it to the back of the front # plate. They they made a flap that went down over where the bag opens so any water hopefully won't get anywhere near the opening or past the seal and into the bag. I tried it, worked great.....If you don't mind hearing your phone bang against your number plate the whole time. I used more tape to tighten up the gap to prevent it from moving in the bag, but that just made it even harder to get the phone out. Problem is, if you are seriously hurt you might not be able to get to the phone or get it out, but if you have bike issues it's good enough. I'll see if I can find a pic of it.

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Payed 60 bucks for a pair that works up to 10 miles away. Worked great riding in woods alone.....until my mom got a hold of the thing in the house and asked if I was okay every 2 minutes.....Kinda done away with 'em unless I go out riding with someone....But for the PITA of hauling it around, it's easier to just carry a cell phone. (We have zero problems getting reception anywhere around where I go riding.) I once saw someone take a zip loc bag and duct tape it to the back of the front # plate. They they made a flap that went down over where the bag opens so any water hopefully won't get anywhere near the opening or past the seal and into the bag. I tried it, worked great.....If you don't mind hearing your phone bang against your number plate the whole time. I used more tape to tighten up the gap to prevent it from moving in the bag, but that just made it even harder to get the phone out. Problem is, if you are seriously hurt you might not be able to get to the phone or get it out, but if you have bike issues it's good enough. I'll see if I can find a pic of it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2A1W9-NQAk Here is actually where I saw it first now that I think about it....around 4 minutes in.

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We have used the Sena SMH10 units for a few year with no issues. Its amazing how much more riding you can do when your riding buddy can tell you be went down or is stuck and then you stop instead of him trying to find you. If you get a set make sure you get the one with the flat mic. Also with this unit you can have up to 4 people talking at the same time like a conference. We leave them on most of the time so we can laugh at each other.

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Here is a video of us riding on a dual sport and I'm talking to the group behind me to tell them which way I'm going.

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I carry a 2 meter radio when riding but don't have it set up to use while riding.  I usually ride alone.  That radio saved my ass in June as I was injured in a remote area.  Phone signal was too weak to use.  I reached somebody 24 miles away and got help.  

2 meter radios are much more expensive than FRS/GMRS and you need a license but have much greater range.  If I had to buy another I would get a 2m/70cm dual band  which would cover FRS/GMRS.  

 

Hey Flyandride or anybody who knows radios, Can you tell me a little more about how you used your 2 meter radio for emergency?  Is there a certain emergency channel on 2m that people monitor?  I ride alone sometimes and I would like to get a little handheld radio to keep in my pack just in case I get hurt or stuck way out in the desert, but I don't know if anybody would be listening if I need it.  I know CB has an emergency channel, but those are too short a range.  Are there a certain set of frequencies that I should make sure my radio receives to maximize my chances contacting someone in an emergency?  I would be using is in the Mojave Desert and San Bernardino Mountains.  (I have a handheld marine radio for boating, would that work?).   THANKS for any info,

 

Greg

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Not sure about flyandride's situation, but out here there's repeater networks that cover a better part of the state (Colorado Connection, http://colcon.org/ ).  New Mexico's "MegaLink" ( http://nm5ml.com/ ) is the biggest network I've used; driving through to my parents place there's a lot of areas where I've got better radio coverage than phone coverage.

If you can hit any one of those towers, they're all going to link up when you transmit and your message goes out over most of the state.  Chances are pretty high there's someone out there on the downlink of one of those repeaters that can help you out. 

 

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