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I have a 2013 kx450f and am a 2nd year motocross racer. I would like to know what the best possible technique would be as far as starts goes. Gear, clutch, throttle, loading suspension, ect. I'm 155 pounds with gear If that makes any difference. Thanks in advance

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This is my gonna be my 3rd year riding for real and I came off a 125 to a 2013 kx450f. I'm interested to hear tips also, the bike is so easy to pull the front wheel up on with just the throttle. I'm scared to gas this bike hard from a dead stop.

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I would highly recommend a holeshot device or launch control. same thing different terminology, makes a huge difference on starts but also experiment with starts.  having both feet on the ground is a good place to start, keeps you balanced better coming out of the gate and you definitely want your weight over the front and I just bought my first 450 in the fall and was playing around with 2nd and 3rd gear starts so id do the same and stick with whatever feels more comfortable, I also have a holeshot device made a big  difference, ive had one on all my bikes im right around 160 in gear so im not far off from you, when your that light 450 front tires come up quick, good luck 

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Are you referring to using the launch control that the kx450f comes with stock? Thanks for the advice!

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no im talking about the aftermarket launch controls, pro circuit, ride engineering and I believe works connection still make them.  theres a few other companys im sure that make them too.  it physically holds your front forks down just for the gate drop just google it and youll come up with tons of results.  I paid 100 bucks for my pro circuit one and they work wonders, I have mine set up to hold my forks down roughly 3.5" from the top of the stroke and helps with keeping weight on the front

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2nd gear should be the gear your in.  No need to overrev thesee bikes as they have plenty of midrange power,  Practice finding the perfect amount of throttle while waiting for the gate to drop.  Then its the release of the clutch which needs to be steady and smooth.  Your butt should be over the footpegs and head over the triple clamps. Your feet should be down on the ground in front of the pegs and you can hold them there for say 50 feet.

 

Also watch tons of Mike Alessi starts as he does it perfect.

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2nd gear should be the gear your in.  No need to overrev thesee bikes as they have plenty of midrange power,  Practice finding the perfect amount of throttle while waiting for the gate to drop.  Then its the release of the clutch which needs to be steady and smooth.  Your butt should be over the footpegs and head over the triple clamps. Your feet should be down on the ground in front of the pegs and you can hold them there for say 50 feet.

 

Also watch tons of Mike Alessi starts as he does it perfect.

 

except at A1 ;)

 

Typically i keep the throttle in the same spot and use the clutch to help adjust traction. 2nd gear starts.  I've never used the kawi holeshot thing so i can't comment on that.

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Both a holeshot device and electronic launch control do basically the same thing in different ways. The kawis launch control retards the timing and lowers the rev limiter.

So if I use the kawi launch control there is no need for a holeshot device?

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So if I use the kawi launch control there is no need for a holeshot device?

 

i would say still use a holeshot device to compress the forks.  the 450s have so much low end that it really helps keep the front wheel down.  If you don't and everyone else does you are instantly putting yourself a bike back or more.

 

the kaw holeshot device works similar(but more aggressive) than some of the ktm's with map selectors for traction.  It just mellows the hit by reducing the ignition advance to try and help control wheel spin.  The fork deal keeps the front compressed until you brake for the first turn.  Think of a drag bike how the front end is low to help keep it from coming up.

 

The key is still 2nd gear, revs! and clutch modulation regardless of which or both you use.

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i would say still use a holeshot device to compress the forks. the 450s have so much low end that it really helps keep the front wheel down. If you don't and everyone else does you are instantly putting yourself a bike back or more.

the kaw holeshot device works similar(but more aggressive) than some of the ktm's with map selectors for traction. It just mellows the hit by reducing the ignition advance to try and help control wheel spin. The fork deal keeps the front compressed until you brake for the first turn. Think of a drag bike how the front end is low to help keep it from coming up.

The key is still 2nd gear, revs! and clutch modulation regardless of which or both you use.

Ohhh ok! I was looking earlier and the Works Connection Pro looks really good. Opinions? Also if I got one how do know how far to put it down on the fork guard? Thanks again

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Many think you need an actual starting gate to practice, but you only really need a flat and smooth area.  Starts are hard to master, practicing over and over is the only way to learn it.

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Ohhh ok! I was looking earlier and the Works Connection Pro looks really good. Opinions? Also if I got one how do know how far to put it down on the fork guard? Thanks again

 

 

The distance on the guard can vary.  Anywhere will help.  If you are a pro they will have several fork guards with different heights for different conditions.  concrete vs dirt, muddy vs dry etc etc. 

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Ohhh ok! I was looking earlier and the Works Connection Pro looks really good. Opinions? Also if I got one how do know how far to put it down on the fork guard? Thanks again

WC includes a paper template you tape on to the fork guard, that shows you exactly where to drill the holes.  They give 3 options.  The further down the guard, the harder it is to set.  I would not use the lowest one if you plan on setting it yourself.

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also when about to launch and your finding a rev point hold your throttle steady at those revs, dont rev/letoff/rev/letoff/rev/letoff because if the gate drops and your on the low rev you wont launch nearly as well

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I am like 140 lb, 2013 crf450.

2nd gear, holeshot device On. Sit mid/front of seat, calfs between pegs and shifter/brake, sit upright, elbows up. Small revs, circa 5000-6000rpm, front brake in, clutch at biting point.

When gate drops, simultaneously release clutch and feed on power in a smooth controlled manor.

When you launch you will lean your upper body forward. You want to keep wheel spin to a minimum so you drive forwards smooth.

I find it is not about the 'jump', people fire out the gate quicker than me almost always, but they spin up/get out of control. 5-10 bike lengths out I am still driving hard with traction ready to get feet up to hook 3rd.

Its not about big revs and clutch dropping, it's about smoothness and traction and getting over the gate clean.

Control power with the clutch, if you start to lift , slip the clutch a bit, but don't just drop it back out. Controlled feed at all times.

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If you dont have eye hand coordination and you have poor reaction time ( doesnt mean you cant  win ) you can spend alot of money and your gonna still get poor starts. If you dont have it you should be practicing using outside lines in the first turn and learning to carry more momentum. Everybody wants the inside not the outside. If deep down inside you really dont wonna be out front coming out of the first turn it aint gonna happen. Out of a 40 bike gate in non-pro racing there wont be but a few that are real meat eaters that want to be out front not just up front.

 

If your not good at starts thats when you have to depend on your practice sessions. When you go out to practice  dont just burn off 50 laps using the same line over and over you ll find yourself following instead of leading when you go to the track. You cant fight for 1 line and win. When you practice pick several diff. lines and alternate every lap and always look for the smoothest and fastest line. Use the whole race track to your advantage not a disadvantage. Might help you improve your game plan on race day. There are always advantages you have to look for them.

 

Tim Ferry that rode for Kawi. got the worst starts his whole career but always finished at the top from riding smart always passing where guys where they werent expecting to get  passed. He was one of the fastest guys out there his starts just sucked.

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I have a 2013 kx450f and am a 2nd year motocross racer. I would like to know what the best possible technique would be as far as starts goes. Gear, clutch, throttle, loading suspension, ect. I'm 155 pounds with gear If that makes any difference. Thanks in advance

 

Excellent question!  Most people overlook practicing starts and don't understand it's likely the only point in the race you have the chance to pass everybody all at once.

 

There is so much that goes into a good or great start.  Before I give you my take on it I will say some good advice has already been given.  Such as watching the 800, pay close attention to every detail.  Every part of his body position, from his feet to his hands.  Also you can check out Gary Semics DVD's, he has a good one on starts.

 

Here's my take on it:  Both feet down, in front of the pegs.  Squeeze the shrouds with your knees.  Depending on traction availability, most likely get your A$$ as close to the fuel cap as possible while still being able to touch the ground.  Chest and head forward over the front number plate.  Elbows in the high over grip position (attack).  Throttle at about the 1/2 open position and one finger on the front brake.  Just before the card goes sideways put it in 2nd gear.  When the card goes sideways load the drive train by easing out on the clutch just until you feel the bike trying to move forward.  Hold it with the front brake.  Focus on the smallest point on the gate you can.  I use the pin that holds it up.  When the gate starts to fall, in one motion, release the front brake, open the throttle WFO, and release the clutch lever.  When done properly it will sound more like an explosion than a slipping take off.  

 

This is much easier typed than done.  You need to practice it in 4 to 5 launches at a time.  You need to give the bike time to cool in between launch sessions.  Start off very slow.  Steadily pick up the pace as you learn the techniques.  You need to be able to go through all the movements with expert precision before you try to make it sound like an explosion rather than a slipping take off.   You can go through the sequence of the gate in your head before you start or have a friend give you hand motions and drop a rock or clump of dirt to simulate the gate drop if you don't have an actual gate.

 

Obviously there is a lot more to it, but that should get you started on your quest for pulling Holey's!

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Shorty got the holeshot at SD in the Main...starting in 3rd.  Not saying that will always work, but if you run short gearing, and are a smaller guy, and the depending on the track...starting in 3rd is a viable option.

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Shorty got the holeshot at SD in the Main...starting in 3rd.  Not saying that will always work, but if you run short gearing, and are a smaller guy, and the depending on the track...starting in 3rd is a viable option.

 

Do we know if his transmission is stock ratio?  Do we know if the final drive is close to stock ratio? 

 

I could deff. start one of these 450's in 3rd in stock trim but I do believe the first 10 feet would be slower than 2nd gear and the abuse the clutch is going to take would not be worth it to me.

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