Jump to content

Idaho Trail chainsaw opinions

Recommended Posts

This one works just fine for me, although at least for me very difficult to ride fast with a saw on board. This a version of Bill Dart's rack.

 

CopyofP7160013_zpsab4fb50f.jpgCopyofP7160011_zps725d3642.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally got my rack made. gonna give it a try tomorrow and see how it goes. still gotta add some thin rubber to the inside and id really like to power coat it, but got for now. 

 

B271B265-1B26-42FC-900B-A919CC29B12C_zps

 

used some rubber hose clamps on the bottom. even had a nut welded to it. added a spacer and it works great

 

F1D2D13F-99C0-4BA4-84A0-13F90143BFC2_zps

 

I've had oil spill in my last back pack so now i don't like caring oil in my pack so i made this pvc pipe bar oil holder. didn't add to much weight. thought id go for it you kind kinda see it in this picture 

 

9FAFAC8E-C80C-4CBA-9DFF-04A36371B855_zps

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had my MS170 for about 7 years now, and it has been just barely worth keeping. That POS 14" "picco" bar and chain has been the thorn in my side from day one. I swear the width of the cut is narrower than the bar. I've asked the worthless Stihl mechanics at the local dealer if there are any alternate bars and chains that would fit this saw, and they refused to help. I was just ready to buy a bigger bar and chain and MAKE it work, when I remembered I had scrapped a busted top-handle Echo a few years back and kept the old full-sized 16" bar and chain. I threw it on the 170 and it works like a charm. It's a hair underpowered, but at least the narrow chain headaches are gone. I'll have to modify my mount to accept the bigger bar, but I'm psyched to go clear some trail!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We went away from the Stihl due to issues and weight but had not been around the MS170. Both my riding buddy and I have Husky 351's, light weight and good power - just have to keep chain speed up. He put a 20" on - it works well but you better keep it sharp!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We went away from the Stihl due to issues and weight but had not been around the MS170. Both my riding buddy and I have Husky 351's, light weight and good power - just have to keep chain speed up. He put a 20" on - it works well but you better keep it sharp!

 

See if you can get a smaller drive sprocket for it, have a husky 50 geared down to pull an aggressive chain. Works good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My headaches with the MS170 continue. I'm having a problem with it randomly and intermittently having fuel starvation issues. It'll suddenly run as if the engine is bone-cold and needs choked. It feels as if there is a chunk of something floating around in the carb.

On top of that, the vibrations and impacts from this saw being attached to my bike have really taken a toll on its cheap build. I have 10+ zip ties holding the handle together in about 5 different places, and a mount recently broke loose in a location by the carb that affects the throttle position if I push down too hard during a cut.

It is a shame this saw is giving me such a bad impression of the Stihl brand, because I also own the pro MS260 and love it. But there's no way I'm taking a $600 saw out on the trail.

On a semi-unrelated note...

I was out cutting firewood last weekend, and I figured I'd get this on video to either see something cool, or document my death.

The tree on the right was leaning in the right direction, and the tree on the left was leaning in the way-wrong direction, but I wanted them both. I strapped them together, then I notched and cut the tree on the left until it just started to lean, and notched the tree on the right and started rolling film.

That's 2 of the 8+/- trees that were on my truck.

image_zps6d59xdvq.jpg

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think I have ever seen anyone load firewood like that. When I was burning wood, I split everything in the field to avoid the mess at home, plus it allowed me more room to load. I like your idea - I may be assuming too much, but you most of had help to load that.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think I have ever seen anyone load firewood like that. When I was burning wood, I split everything in the field to avoid the mess at home, plus it allowed me more room to load. I like your idea - I may be assuming too much, but you most of had help to load that.

Ha, nope, that's all me. I've developed a few techniques over the years to get in, get a bunch'o wood, and get out. Stacking like that definitely gets some odd looks, but it's really the only way to get that much wood on that truck. (After split and stacked,) that's 3+ cords in ~6 hours. Granted, it took me 3 1/2 more hours to get down off the mountain and back over the pass in that old beast... :D

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My headaches with the MS170 continue. I'm having a problem with it randomly and intermittently having fuel starvation issues. It'll suddenly run as if the engine is bone-cold and needs choked. It feels as if there is a chunk of something floating around in the carb.

 

There is a diaphram that has fuel on one side of it and a pressure pulse on the other side that acts as a fuel pump. The pulse comes from the crankcase through a tiny hole in the carb flange, a hole in the gasket, and a hole in the carb. make sure that all lines up right and isn't blocked by a tiny bit of sawdust or oil gunk, or the gasket shifted.  

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My headaches with the MS170 continue. I'm having a problem with it randomly and intermittently having fuel starvation issues. It'll suddenly run as if the engine is bone-cold and needs choked. It feels as if there is a chunk of something floating around in the carb.

On top of that, the vibrations and impacts from this saw being attached to my bike have really taken a toll on its cheap build. I have 10+ zip ties holding the handle together in about 5 different places, and a mount recently broke loose in a location by the carb that affects the throttle position if I push down too hard during a cut.

It is a shame this saw is giving me such a bad impression of the Stihl brand, because I also own the pro MS260 and love it. But there's no way I'm taking a $600 saw out on the trail.

On a semi-unrelated note...

I was out cutting firewood last weekend, and I figured I'd get this on video to either see something cool, or document my death.

The tree on the right was leaning in the right direction, and the tree on the left was leaning in the way-wrong direction, but I wanted them both. I strapped them together, then I notched and cut the tree on the left until it just started to lean, and notched the tree on the right and started rolling film.

That's 2 of the 8+/- trees that were on my truck.

image_zps6d59xdvq.jpg

I love the Ford dually maxed out, pretty cool. Tethering the trees though? Not so much, my buddy did that on his property back in 2009 and well,  he's been dead since 2009. Be careful dude. :thumbsup:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tethering the trees though? Not so much, my buddy did that on his property back in 2009 and well,  he's been dead since 2009. Be careful dude. :thumbsup:

 

+1 That's a pretty sketchy maneuver.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the Ford dually maxed out, pretty cool. Tethering the trees though? Not so much, my buddy did that on his property back in 2009 and well, he's been dead since 2009. Be careful dude. :thumbsup:

+1 That's a pretty sketchy maneuver.

I appreciate the concern, and sorry to hear about your buddy, rolliew. That's tragic.

I think a violent end was a much higher risk during the 70 mile ride home down sketchy, off-camber logging roads and over 4th of July Pass on I-90 in a 52 year-old one-ton truck with five tons of weight on it than it was dropping those trees.

The slack in the line was deliberate to give me some time and to give tree #1 some momentum (so they weren't stuck there like Chinese handcuffs), and I ran out of the camera's sight to take cover behind a thickly bunched fortress of trees.

I understand my risk every time I set foot in the woods, be it getting firewood or riding, and I try to plan for the worst, as well as minimize my risk.

To keep this thread on topic, I was out riding and clearing trail over the weekend, and my chain stopped dead. Upon inspection, the chain looked funny at the roller at the tip of the bar. I pulled the chain off to see the bearing in the sprocket self destructed, and it split the tip of the bar wide open with little needle bearings jamming it open and being spread along the groove along the bottom of the bar.

Is this common? I've never seen that happen before.

Luckily, we were able to manhandle or otherwise get around the rest of the dead-fall to get out. Otherwise, we would have had a 45 mile backtrack on ST to get back to the trucks.

I swear that saw is cursed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To keep this thread on topic, I was out riding and clearing trail over the weekend, and my chain stopped dead. Upon inspection, the chain looked funny at the roller at the tip of the bar. I pulled the chain off to see the bearing in the sprocket self destructed, and it split the tip of the bar wide open with little needle bearings jamming it open and being spread along the groove along the bottom of the bar.

Is this common? I've never seen that happen before.

Luckily, we were able to manhandle or otherwise get around the rest of the dead-fall to get out. Otherwise, we would have had a 45 mile backtrack on ST to get back to the trucks.

I swear that saw is cursed.

 

That bearing was just probably worn out, how's the guide rails look like on the bar?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That bearing was just probably worn out, how's the guide rails look like on the bar?

Worn out. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For those of you running a Stihl MS170, I just picked up a nice, cheap alternative to the stock bar and chain. Oregon part #27857. It is a 16" bar and chain combo for $32.00 at the local farm store. It is a direct fit, despite there being no mention of Stihl compatibility on the package.

image_zps1bh1gnfi.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a craftsman bar and Oregon chain on my Stihl 019T

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love this thread ... and I too am sorry about the loss of your friend, Rollie.

 

But it's the help regarding saw carrying and maintenance.  That's been a fun part of riding for me and I love when I get a chance to clear a trail that "nature" has taken back over the winter, or several winters.  Be careful out there, but keep these tips and advice coming.  Volunteer trail clearing is a given ... we just need to do it safely and the courses offered take a day from riding and can't cover every situation.

Edited by dilyb
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×