Hey ThumperFaq guy - Rick Kienle

I was looking through the FAQ and didn't find a page about the following subjects:

1) Greasing/repacking the hub bearings (front & back). We have linkage and steering head assy but not much about the hubs themselves - do we need to grease them or just press them out and use new bearings after a while - if so how often? :usa:

2) I've seen posts about changing the brake fluids but nothing official in the FAQ - can someone in the know, put together a page/writeup with pictures etc. so that it can be added to the FAQ? :D

3) How about someone doing a writeup for changing the oil in the rear shock? My local suspension guy uses 2 or 2.5w(?) oil for the shock and 5w for the forks. I would like to see a writeup on how to break down a rear shock to change the oil and recharge it in the FAQ. Here is a nice link for rebuilding and installing the Racetech Gold Valves in the Kayaba forks that should be added to the FAQ.

4) A page about springs (standard vs. progressive) would be nice to have too - I would like to see the pros and cons on this subject on the FAQ since so many people swap out their springs to match their weights, it would be a nice addition so that we can be educated with our decisions. :)

Any other subjects missing that our TT knowledge base (i.e. the members) can put together and add to the FAQ to make it more complete? :usa::D :D

That's a lot of work keeping that site going Rick, I want to thank YOU again and all involved! :D :D :D

3) How about someone doing a writeup for changing the oil in the rear shock? My local suspension guy uses 2 or 2.5w(?) oil for the shock and 5w for the forks. I would like to see a writeup on how to break down a rear shock to change the oil and recharge it in the FAQ. Here is a nice link for rebuilding and installing the Racetech Gold Valves in the Kayaba forks that should be added to the FAQ.

Make sure to include information about how to get to and change the valving while you're in there, front and back. I dont know if you'd want to put different valve stacks up or not, the stock stacks might be good to have for each year and model. Then people could see for example the difference between the WR Stack and the YZ stack, and from there begin experimenting with their own stacks.

Just a thought

The main reason these subjects are not covered is I do not feel I can do them justice myself. Except for hub bearings. I can put something together on that. For the other subjects, I welcome anyone interested to submit a writeup and pictures if possible and I will post it. :)

One more thing you might want to add or do some more research on. Sticky/ grabby clutches. I know we have all been through all the tricks and mods and i have written several posts on the subject myself. I had replaced the stock basket with a Hinson a while back and it seemed to solve the problem.

Now you remember the large thin washer and spring that seats against the hub. Some people believed it caused problems with the clutch dragging or made it hard to find neutral so they removed them. I did this mod too, way before I put the Hinsen Basket in. Well last week I ran into a problem. I noticed a different noise at higher rpms when I first started to have clutch problems (before I replaced the basket), I had since wrote it off as valve train noise since i could never seem to be able to track it down. Well a few weeks back i had noticed it had gotten louder untill last weekend. After practicing some serious hard laps I could really hear something was wrong especially when I engaged the clutch.

After taking the bike home and tearing into the clutch I found the the first friction plate broken into about 7 pieces. This is the plate that sits against the hub, not the pressure plate. I know I abuse the clutch, so it is possible that it was just my abuse that killed the plate. But after thinking about the noise I was hearing and the similarity it had to what i thought was valve train noise, I now think it was the clutch all along. Just so you know, the noise i was hearing was not chatter, it was a resonating sound at high rpms right after I chop the throttle.

What i am thinking is that the washer/spring combo being removed, might have something to do with the noise and the broken friction plate.

I am hoping to have the new clutch back together this weekend. I'll be replacing the clutch springs and will also be putting the washer/spring back on the hub to see if this noise is still there. Other than the new plates, I will be swapping the other parts one at a time to see if I can locate the noise, that is if it's still there at all.

Have you heard anything else about this happening or if removing the washer and spring off the hub has caused any problems or failures?

If you want, I will keep you posted if I can come up with anything this weekend.

Yes, I know this happens. I had a 00' RM125 and it was terrible about breaking the innermost friction plate. This is because a lot of the pressure is put on this plate. The cushion spring in the clutch helps even out the pressure a bit so not one plate gets overloaded. I do not recommend removing the seat plate and cushion spring. Those broken clutch plate pieces could also contaminate the oil and cause harm to your engine.

Actually I have a whole page on clutches. I even have a blurb on removing the clutch spring and boss. I will certainly add these comments to that section so others are aware of the potential pitfalls of that mod. Thanks.

By the way av, you can just call me Rick. :D Or if you prefer Mr. ThumperFaq Guy. :)

Cheers

Make sure to include information about how to get to and change the valving while you're in there, front and back. I dont know if you'd want to put different valve stacks up or not, the stock stacks might be good to have for each year and model. Then people could see for example the difference between the WR Stack and the YZ stack, and from there begin experimenting with their own stacks.

This link that I referred to, has a pretty good write up about the Kayaba forks, valves/shim stack etc. What we need is how to do the rear shock :) Any taker on this subject? :D

Ask and you shall receive:

Wheel Bearings

Rear shocks are not that bad to take apart or service. If you are reasonably skilled and have the correct tools. However assembly is another matter. A couple years back, I had the opportunity to interview and spend some time with Rick "Ziggy" Zielfelder, the owner of factory connection. While watching Rick rebuild a shock I realized that it takes lots of experience and some special tools to reassemble a shock and truely get all the air out of the body. I am not trying to rain on your idea. It is just that sometimes experience and knowledge can lead one to understand some tasks are better left to those equipped to do the job correctly.

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