Wheelies with stock sprocket(s)?

I'm new to this - and still getting warmed up to the bike.  At the same time, I'm starting to get comfortable enough... and have gotten so I can pop the front wheel off the ground with ease in first gear.  While I haven't spent much time trying it in second gear, what little I have played in second gear has me feeling that it may not even be doable to get the bike to lift to wheelie height in second gear, and even less so in third.  Is this about right?  Or is it a matter of more rpm's and a harder/faster release of the clutch?

 

Thoughts?

You'll want to regear to 13/42. Your clutch will thank you.

You'll want to regear to 13/42. Your clutch will thank you.

 

13/48 would be better ....  :thumbsup:

13/48 would be better ....  :thumbsup:

12/60  :jawdrop:

Wheelies are not about power. You can ride endless wheelies on a bicycle and they have no power at all. It's about balance. Plan to flip and crash a few times if you really want to learn to ride one. I try to keep the front wheel on the ground unless I have to lift it over something like a tree or rock and 1-2 feet is as high as I need the front wheel. A wheelie is 10% bike 90% rider.

I cant pop my front up with the 13/40  :thumbsdn:

I cant pop my front up with the 13/40 :thumbsdn:

Coast about 12-15 miles an hour. Have it in 2nd gear, pull in the clutch, rev it up, dump the clutch with rpms up. It will do a wheelie. I have 13-40.

Coast about 12-15 miles an hour. Have it in 2nd gear, pull in the clutch, rev it up, dump the clutch with rpms up. It will do a wheelie. I have 13-40.

Every time I dump the clutch my rear just spins.

Every time I dump the clutch my rear just spins.

Sorry, I was talking about on pavement. You were talking about dirt?

Every time I dump the clutch my rear just spins.

 

It is all about timing .... like was mentioned from a rolling start but also when you pull in the clutch tap the front brake hard while pushing down on the forks while standing to compress the forks then pop the clutch twist hard on the throttle and drop your butt hard on the seat back by the fender while yanking up on the bars ... this whole process should be one fluid motion that takes place almost simultaneously ....  :ride: ... it takes practice to get the timing down. 

I do wheelies all day for miles.. You don't even need the clutch.. The easiest way is to throw ur weight back hard and pull up on the handlebars while giving it throttle. Should come up no probs.. I do that on a 450sxf., 250 2smoke and even on my girls crf100f. Never used the clutch ever for wheelies.

Image is nothing just obey your thirst!!

Throw your back back and grab throttle at same time, it'll happen, I promise. "Bouncing" works too. Push down on front (compress forks), and on bounce back grab that throttle and pull back.

Thanks for all the replies!

Thanks for all the replies!

Edited by OfficialDirtSquad

The goof in this video just made it harder for anyone trying to learn how to do wheelies

Image is nothing just obey your thirst!!

The goof in this video just made it harder for anyone trying to learn how to do wheelies

Image is nothing just obey your thirst!!

 

I do not really think so ... I do agree it was goofy and maybe geared towards a complete beginner, but I think most of us learned this way by dragging our feet like that when we were kids ... and this is to learn balance wheelies that I really do not like to do as sooner or latter something will go wrong. I do them kinda in between a power and a balance wheelie. I pop it up at a slower speed lower RPM and then just try to keep it going all the while shifting to 3rd ... I do not ride them very far on this bike either tho ... my old RM250 would ride a pretty long 4th gear power wheelie .... 

 

Edited by gnath9

The first thing I was taught back in 1975 was cover the rear brake basically.  I would loosen it up.  A 9 year old kid can learn how on a 1974 XL100, it's not black magic. 

 

If you really want to get good remove the breakable items since odds are you will over shoot the balance point at some point.  Then it's all about storing energy and releasing it.  Time the compression, weight shifting body movements and throttle application with a seat bounce if needed.   Once you reach the balance point it's all about balance, throttle and brake control.   A good 1st gear wheelie is a blast if understand how.  You can slow down, speed up and turn.   

 

I can't balance like that anymore, fortunately I have long legs to save me.   :ride:

As you watch visualize his center of gravity. 

 

His brake control is incredible, just like his riding.  He is a great example.

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